(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Virginia Beach sun"

PnBVBHMiHBWMMMII 



n 



The Vi i ^i n ia Beadi Sun 




Dealing With Pressure, Stress 

When Cops Can't Hack It 






StCTlUN 



ByGrcfGcddfarb . 
SunEd^tor 
"Ymt i0ke a kid off the areet. He's Uved at home with 
his parmts; gotten out muI gone to college a little bit, 
Uved on his own. He's 21 years old. Do you think 12 
weeks in the Modemy dhd pinning a Itadge on him is 
going to make a cop out him? Or keep Mm from getting 
ju^hoiogicaUy messed up? Or Insure he's not already 
messed up?" - yirginia Beach PoUee Captain J. W. 
Bra^r, commander, personnel and training. 

Btaziet., an attorney, has 17 years with the Virginia 
Beach Police Department. His years of wiperience tell 
'him, among other things, that police administrators, 
and departmental policies and procedures aren't 
helping police officers deal with the stress and pressure 
accompanying police work. 

Most often, the pressure of coping with life and death 
situations at a moment's notice results in the police of- 
ficer becoming stoical in their work and at home. 

"How do you walk into a scene," Brazier said, "or 
something that has been devastating in someone's life: a 
homocide; or the death of a baby that's accidental. 
You're going to go in there and get emotional with 
them? You're th?re to handle the situation for the 
system. There's no getting emotional over it; and that's 
what happens. They start smothering their emotions." 

Brazier fears that if officers continue to habitually 
suppress their emotions, a practice reinforced by inter- 
action with peers who are also police officers, the 
resulting anxiety and tension may trigger objectionable 
human behavior. 



"In the last coufrie of years we've kilted some people 
in the streets, which we've never done before in this 
police dqiartment," Brazier said. "And we've had oc- 
casion to sho(H two or three people. It has a big 
psychological impact on the officer." Since 1974, 
Virginia Beach po\ux officers have killed five people; 
two of the m since 1980. 

^^*Psychological problems are kinda 
like your problems. That's how the 
system in the past looked at it. But 
that's all changing" - Virginia Beach 
Police Captain J. W. Brazier, comman- 
der, personnel and training 

It was the shooting which convinced Brazier more 
than ever that some sort of psychological testing was 
needed for Virginia Beach ptAwx officers. Brazier is 
consulting with professional psychological agencies to 
determine which one can best meet Virginia Beach's 
needs. 

He Had To Hack It 

There are almost a dozen widely used psychological 
tests available for the general public, but none expressly 
for police officers. 

"Just to say 'psychological evaluations,' is a gross 
Sec COPS. Page 6 



Indecent Exposure Up 

Incidents In Virginia Beach Up 241% Since '72; 
Authorities Differ Over What Should Be Done 



By Mike Gooding 

Sun Staff Writer 

"It's a serious threat to 

tWf community," said 

-j«M^M»«. Moore of 

^^rginia Beach Juve- 



|J10 

O 

^220 

1 
I 210 

|200 



nile and Domestic 
Relations Grcuit Qxirt. 

Paul A Sciortino, the 
city's commonwealth's 
attorney. ^Ued tfce 
offense "a crime com- 



mitted by disturbed 
individuals which con- 
tinues to plague the com- 
muoity." 

The judge and the pro- 
secuto", along with police 



1 180 
170 



^ 



-160 

a 

& 
S140 



s 



130 



1 120 

1 110 

e 
ilOO 

9 



4S 



90 




1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 
Souree: Sandy Blake, Statistician, Virginia Beach Police Department 



Cox Cable Rate Hike Entangled 



ByLeeCahiU 
Sun Cnindl R^xnter 
TTw Cox CMble rate 
increase became entan- 



gled with politics as the 
two anteiKlers for the 
Republican nominatioa to 
a Beacb State Senate seitt 



Candlelight Service For 
MIA/POW's At Oceana 



the C4H«PCH of the 
Uafted State* hat 
citablishcd Satnrday, 
April 9 as National POW/ 
MDAItecogidtloiiDay. 

Naval Air Statioa 
Oceaaa, la MppMrt of 
coi^ctri^ ae^, wW 
jehi Ike Natoni LeapM 
rf Fa^la rf AMifcaa 
Pilsoaen ai^ Wa^H !■ 
SMlh^ Aata tai ^oa- 
a POW/MIA caiK 



dldigkt i^vkc at I'M 
p.B. OB Satarday, Apdl 9 
la the Ckapd of the Geed 
SbeplKrd. 

The paMe Is 
iavlled to Jola 
nlaate iwkc 
all fornicr AaieHcaa 
POWi aai MIA'a. la al- 

.tMmi vw«Mi row's 

Mid the hmmm^aome 
VictMHMU's. 



made similar motions to 
erase the iiuTease. 

Even after a City Coun- 
cil numbers got t(%ether 
in an end-of-the-meeting 
executive session to come 
up with a suitabk motion. 
Councilman Harold Hei- 
schober stuck by ' his 
motiont a sut»titute to the 
ooe Qiade by Coundl- 
wcnan Meyera Obem- 
dorf. Both seek the 
Republican nomination 
for tte new Senate sett at 
tteSeKh. 

After Obemdorf msle 
ter tmjtioa with refine- 
ments deckM in the 
executive session. Mayor 
Louis R. Jooes asked 
SeeCsuP^eT 



officers and psycholo- 
gists, are addressing 
indecent exposure, a 
crime occuring with 
increas{l!^ regularly in '' 
Virginia Beach. 

In 1982, there were 227 
cases of indecent 
exposure in the city, 
according to pcrfice 
department statistics. 
That represents an 
increase of nearly 120 
percent over the previous 
year's 190 indecent 
exposure cases. Since 
1972, when there were 94 
cases on the bcxAs, Vir- 
ginia Beach indecent 
exposure cases have 
exploded by 241 percent. 

Law enforcement offi- 
cials are unable to explain 
the increase. They point, 
however, to Virginia 
Beach's booming popula- 
ticm, which has risen over 
the last decade from 
188,700 to more than 
292,000 residents, accord- 
ing to the city's Depart- 
ment of Economic Deve- 
lopment. 

According to the Code 
of Virginia, s«;tion 18.1- 
-387, those found guilty of 
indecent exposure shall 
be "every persai who 
intentionally makes an 
obscene display or 
exposure of his person, or 
the private parts thereof, 
in any public place, or in 
any place where others 
are present, or procures 
another to so expose him- 
self." The vidation, a 
Qass One misdemeanor, 
ou^ries a penalty of up to 
12 months in jail and up to 
$1,000 in fines. 

TTie (rffense becomes a 
felony when children are 
invdved. "Any person 18 
years erf age or over, who, 
with lasdvious intent shall 
knowingly and intention- 
ally expose his or her 
sexual or genital parts to 
any child under the age <rf 
14 years to whom such a 
person is not legally 
married" is guilty <rf Tim 
Code of \1rginia, section 
18.2-370 offense, "taking 
indecent liberties with 
diildren." The crime is a 
Class six felony, carrying 
a penahy of incarceratioo 
<rf from one to five years. 
Parents and guardians (rf 
diildren under 18 can be 
coovkrted erf taking in<te- 
<*nt liberties with child- 
ren, as well, according to 

See SOLUTION, ftiie 7 




or 



VM ^ 



i^i'i 



Vliglnla Beach Rider Debi Connor, on Main Frame, will compete in Benefit 
•■ TiOni^ Show >■ 

Ocean Fun Show A t Pendleton 



Benefit Horse Show For CF Set 



The 5th Annual 
Virginia Beach Ocean Fun 
Horse Show to benefit the 
Cystic Fibrosis Foun- 
dation will be held at 
Camp Pendleton Wed- 
nesday through Sunday, 
April 6 to 10, starting at' 
10 a.m. on Wednesday, 
April 6 until sundown, 
and starting at 8 a.m. until 
sundown on the following 
days. 

The Ocean Fun Horse 
Show is rated 'A' in all 
divisions, which is the 
highest possible rating. 

The Ocean Fun Horse 
Show had $60,000 last 
year in expenses, but 
raised $3,000 for CF. This 
year's goal is $4,000. 

Some of the best horses 
in the country, 600 entries 



are expected, will be in 
Virginia Beach for the five 
days of the show. The 
spectacular $1,000 Ocean 
Fun Jumper Stake at 1 
p.m. on Sunday, April 10 
traditionally attracts some 
of the finest high-jumping 
horses in the nation and 
has been a consistently 
thrilling crowd pleaser. 
These are the same horses 
and riders seen competing 
on sports television net- 
works and in th Olympics. 

Locally, Pam Baker's 
Hillcrest Farms, of 
Virginia Beach, always a 
strong contender for state 
and nationaj>%vards, will 
have many young riders in 
the junior and student 
divisions. 

Judges for the show are: 



Mr. Brian Flynn, Des 
Moines, Iowa; Mr. 
Donald Stewart, Jackson- 
ville, Florida; Mr. Herbert 
G. Lytle, Dickerson, 
Maryland; Mrs. JoAnn 
Schaudies, Seneca, Mary- 
land; and Mrs. Frances 
Rowe, Crozier, Virginia. 
The course designer, Mr. 
Robert Ridland, is a 
present member of the 
United States Olympic 
Team and is fresh from 
competition in Florida for 
World Cup Preliminaries. 

Ticket prices are $2 for 
adults and $1 for children. 
Tickets are available at the 
gale only. 

For more information 
call Mrs. Michael Mills, 
426-2661 or 486-2717; or 
Mrs. Donald Webb, 426- 
65% or 426-5105. 



Bill 220 

Uy Circg Cioldfarb 

Sun Idlloi 

House Bill 220. 
providifii^andatory jail 
or prison kntencing for 
those convicted of 
assaulting police of- 
ficers, has been signed 
into law by Governor 
Charles Robb. 

The new law will take 
effect on July I, 1983. 

After 
My 7, if 

convicted 
of hitting a 
cop, you 

go to jail. 



Under the new law, if 
a person is convicted of=™= 
maliciously injuring a 
police officer on duty, 
that person will serve a 
minimum of two and up 
to 20 years in prison. If a 
person seriously, but not 
maliciously injures a 
police officer, if convic- 
ted that person will 
spend a minimum of one 
and up to five years in 
prison. If you hit a police 
officer but don't break 
the skin, if convicted the 
charge carries a 
minimum of six months 
and up to a year in jail 

Since 1975, there have 
been 856 assaults on 
Virginia Beach police of- 
ficers. Over 300 of them, 
306, have been assaulted 
at least once. Fifty-two 
have been assaulted at 
least twice. Others have 
been assaulted up to 
three, four, five, seven 
and nine times. These 
figures only reflect 
reported assaults. 
Robb Support 
A spokesman for 
Robb, Timothy Sullivan, 
executive assistant for 
police, said Robb didn't 
sign the bill under 
pressure from any par- 
ticular locality. He did it 
because of the perilous 
nature of law enfor- 
cemfcnl. 

"It establishes a 
reasoned principle in . 
light of the risk law en- 
forcement officials take 
in what they do every 
day, just by being law 
enforcement officers," 
Sullivan said. 




Artist's conception of new Stihl plant. 



June 1 Is Target Date For Stihl Completion 



Stihl Incorporated, a 
major Virginia Beach- 
tased chain saw manufac- 
turer, is busy moving into 
iU new, 100,000 square 
focrf Manufacturing Plant 
II - a ivoduct of the latest 
that today's sute-of-the- 
art architectural design 
and construction 
teduMk^ can offer. 

T^ first phi^ of the 
&ihl move is sch«luM to 



be completed by the end 
of June. First occupants 
of the 5.3 million dollar 
expansion will include 
Stihl's tool-and-die shop, 
its apprentice shop, main- 
tenance department, pre- 
production machining, 
plastic production and 
manufacturing ad- 
ministration offices. 

Future expansion plans 
fw Stihl Incorporated in- 



clude the addition of a 
hot-chamber magnesium 
die casting operation to be 
located in a specially 
designed section of the 
new building. When fully 
equipped and operational, 
at the cost of an additional 
five million dollars, this 
section of Manufacturing 
Plant II will provide all 
magnesium components 
needed by Stihl chain saw 



models assembled at the 
company's Oceana In- 
dustrial Park location. i 

All secondary produc- 
tion processes and support 
activities needed to 
produce the magnesium 
castings will be concen- 
trated within the expanded 
fKility. These operations 
include trimming, 
and vibratory finishing. 



2 Virginia Beach Sun, April 6, 1983 



Sun Commentary 



Editorials 



OaEdge 



The degree of stress which a person 
feels is not necessarily predicated by the 
demands of the job, but by the conscien- 
tiousness of the person performing the 
•* duties. 

Given this premise, the hard working 
dog catcher, for example, can feel as 
much pressure as a lifeguard, who scours 
the beach and oce.ui to insure the safety 
of sun lovers. 

On a day-to-day basis, police officers 
work as if they were balancing at the edge 
of a steep, jagged cliff. As long as their 
feet are on hard ground, they are safe and 
secure. But they are also keenly aware 
that at any moment they could fall, or be 
pushed off the cliff. 

Imagine standing at the edge of a high 
dropoff for a day. Weeks. Months. 
Years. Imagine knowing that the next step 
or a wrong step could be your last. 
Naturally it would tear at your mind, but 
it's your job and you do it. 



Police experts say police officers should 
be tested by different psychological stan- 
dards than are administered to the general 
public. 

Psychological tests would, it is said, 
determine those candidates best fit for 
duty, and those most or least likely to be 
affected by job pressure. Today, most 
psychological tests are limited to those 
who are "grossly unfit for police ser- 
vice," according to an article in the spring 
issue of "Your Virginia State Trooper," 
magazine. Nor do current tests give a fair 
indication of the future job performance 
of the subject. 

Experts now plan to test "real" 
working police officers to obtain standar- 
ds of behavior. After the general profile 
of a typical police officer is determined, 
other officers may then be tested against 
the norm. This isn't a final answer to the 
question, but it is a step in the right direc- 
tion.— G.D.G. 



Indecent 



Experts differ on the dangers presented 
the community by the crime of indecent 
exposure. 

Police, prosecutors and judges say that 
those who engage in exhibitionism, par- 
ticuarly with children, present a threat to 
the community. They contend that in- 
decent exposure could lead to aggravated 
sexual assault. 

Psycholo^ssay that se-ca^dflashers > 
are not aggressive, and they pose little 
danger to anyone. Instead, say the exper- 
ts, exhibitionists are merely a nuisance. 

In either case, both sides agree that 
something must be done. 

In Virginia Beach, indecent exposure 
incidents have more than doubled in the 
last 10 years. Most of the time, the victims 
are young girls. Although the extent of 
long-range damage inflicted upon these 
children by the act is unknown, it is 
probably safe to conclude that nothing 



good can come of such episodes. 

Much concern has centered around the 
perpetrators of the act, who all agree are 
deeply troubled individuals. They are ob- 
viously in need of much professional 
assistance. 

There would be those who insist that 
such persons be tossed into jail. Likewise, 
there would be others who treat indeceflt 
lexposure as a jok«, and/Opt to do nothing, 
at all. Both solutions seem extTCcaek ,»•..;, , 

i 
r ■ I 

The wisest course seems to be thai 
chosen by the Circuit Court of Virginia 
Beach. Judges there have leaned toward 
counseling for first-time offenders, rather 
than jail. Exhibitionists are not criminals 
in the pure sense of the word; they are 
disturbed persons with acute 
psychological flaws. 

They need help, not jail. The city is 
right to see it this way— M.M.G. 



Peer Help 



Along about the age of 12, a metamor- 
phosis of sorts takes place within the 
biological make-up of the human body, 
producing many changes, both extenal 
and internal. This is known as adoles- 
cence. 

Accompanying the obvious outward 
development are also a host of emotional 
and psychological changes. Some teenagers 
are able to handle this volatile period; 
others are not. 

Virginia Beach's Independence Junior 
High School is doing something about the 
problem. A guidance counselor and a 
teacher there last fall join^ forces with a 
city agen&y, the Comprehensive Mental 
Health unit, and developed an ambitious 
and innovative program call^ "peer 
counseling." 

Troubled young people need someone 
in whom they Can confide; someone with 
whom to share their disillusionment, con- 



>».. 



fusion and pain. There is, however, 
among youngsters a lack of trust for 
many of these adults, therefore leaving 
nowhere for some of them to turn. This is 
where peer counseling comes in. 

Ten Independence students have spent 
the first three months of 1983 in intensive 
training, learning to be good listeners and 
more analytical in their thought 
processes. The program, ideally, should 
work like this: Since kids won't talk to 
adults, perhaps they wilf talk to other 
kids. The program is fashioned after a 
similar program in California. 

Growing up can often include un- 
pleasant experiences. Communication is 
an important device to help adolescents 
through the rough times. Independence 
Junior and the City of Virginia Beach 
have recognized these problems and are 
working to solve them.— M.M.G. 

A fealur* story on (he program will appear next 
week. 



Navaho Rugs 



Most people in Virginia Beach are fond 
of beach blankets. For those who are fond 
of Indian blankets, the Virginia Beach Ar- 
ts Center is presenting an exhibition 
during the month of April entitled "100 
Years Of Navaho Rugs." 

The exhibition comes to Virginia Beach 
from a collection at the University of New 
Mexico. The rugs represent Navaho 
weaving since the coming of the railroads 
to the southwest in the 1 880's. 



The display reflects diverse regional 
and stylistic designs created by the 
Navahos during the last century, said 
Marian E. Rodee, curator of the Maxwell 
Museum at UNM. 

Of course none of these Navaho 
blankets will ever set thread on Virginia 
Beach beaches, but they can and should 
be viewed just a few blocks from the san- 
dy oceanfront at the arts ceiMer, lOca^ at 
1711 Arctic Avenue. 



Virginia Beach's Historic History In The Liby^jes 



The Francis 
Land House, pop- 
ularly known as 
Rose Hall 




Library 
SUHIines 



LArariM Cwoin Fvwdl 




In 1978. Rebecca Mason, then hewi of the Reference 
EMvision of the Virginia Beach Depaitn^nt of Public 
Libraries, was approached by represenUtives of local 
garden clubs and civic leagues who hoped that the 
library department would develop a program oo historic 
homes in Virginia Beadi. 

While a number of such sites were well known, the 
identification of lesser known homes was a painstaking 
project. Newspaper clippings about specific historic 
homes yielded a lot of information and often included 
references to other sites. In additioi. the Princess Anne 
Histcx-ical Society provided invaluable help. Slowly a 
list of possible sites was compiled. Location of some 
homes was diffunih as it was necessary to determine if they 
were still standing and to pinpoint locations on modern 
maps. Further research on the selected sites was done 
largely through newspaper articles and Sadie Scott 
Kellam's '\<fMd Houses In Princess Anne Virginia" 
(Printcraft, 1931). 



Equally difficult was identifying present owners of 
the historic homes. After this process was canpleted, a 
written contract was developed which guaranteed that 
in exchange Iqk permission to photograph the site, the 
library wouW protect the owner's privacy by not 
divulging theexaa location of the site. 

The photc^raphs were taken during the summer df 
1978 by Frank Smith, scniw Iteference Librarian. He, 
along with Dorothy Williams, senicM- Fteference 
Librarian and researcher for the project, visited each 
site, often gaining additioial infcM-mation and occasion- 
ally tours by the owners. This additional information 
was verified and checked with the Princess Anne 
HstOTical Society and finally, a script was synchronized 
with the slides. "The Way We Were: Historic Sites of 
Virginia Beach" features 44 sites including homes, 
churches, the Norwegian Lady and the Cape Henry 
landing cross. 

Some highlights of the presentation are: 

Fraocis land Iloase~1732 

This house is fi^equently and incorrectly referred to as 
Rose Hall probably because it housed the Rose Hall 
Dress Shop for many years. The house has been 
registered with the Virginia Landmarks Commission 
and the National Register of Mstoric Places as '"Hie 
Francis land House", after the builder. The first 

See LIBRARIES Page 4 



3 

3 
« 

3 



I 

3- 



1 ^ 



Vietnam: War Not Declared, But One That Killed 



I By Del Vernon 

I kirgiaki Bmfekrtsfittai Del Vernon, retired 

iMarine combat correspondent, is now a public aj- 

^Jairs specialist with Naval Air Rework Facility, In 

\ Norfolk. He spent a tour in Korea and two in 

Vietnam, covering ground and aviation units 

there. He was wounded three times covering the 

conflict in Southeast Asia. 

To many, Vietnam probably should be forgotten 
- a sheer impossibility. Though we try to erase 
the sight, smell and memory of a part of history 
that we lived through, the reoccuring stigma is 
still there. 

(tow can you erase the picture of a copsman 
cradling an eight-year-dd with a leg torn off by an 
artillery sheU, or an dd wcman. oblivious to the 
war that had raged around her for 30 years, who 
has suddenly lost her family? Can you fa-get the 
pdgnant smell of burnt flesh,the 1000-vard stare 
of an 18-year old trooper fresh off the Kansas 
farm? 

Do you remember the night? How dark is dark? 
How quiet is the stillness, broken occasionally by 
the distant cry of a youngster, a rifle shot, the 
ear-shattering explosion of "incoming?" 

Can you forget names like AnHoa, Hoa Tran, 
Khe Sanh, TanSonNhut. HiU 55, Asha Valley, The 
Rock Pile, Go Nd Island, Saigon, DaNang, 
QuanTri, HoaVang, CamNe, HdAnn, QuiNoi, 
The Triangle, and others. Hardly! 

Some of us were swept up in patriotism, 
vdunteered once and even vdunteered a second 
or third time in what we felt was our duty. The 
rights or wrongs of the war didn't seem to weight 
heavy on the miilds (^ilnB»y...welMwc at war. A 
unique was...nd declared, but one that killed. 
One that maimed, fiightened, hurt, made heroes 
and awards of some, made men of a lot. It didn't 
make any differencx whether you were flying a^ 
slick, fast jet or maneuverable helicqjter, drove a 
tank, crossed rivers in an amphibious vehicle. 



built buildings, paid peqjlc, cooked beans, 
Hogged' through the rice paddies or made 
loag-range reconnaissanM patrds. But those are 
the pec^Ie who are heroes and were slaves to the 



"1 I 



I 
I 



war. 



While there were those who grew fat oa the 
spdis of war, dhers were flying to places like 
Yokosuka Naval Hospital, Kue Army Hospital, 
"Charlie Med", the USS REPOSE or to a hde 
carved in the ground, taila: made for oat who, 
willingly ot grudginly, gave his life lot an 
unpc^ular cause. 

In the age of the pre-push-button war, there 
were those who came back, scarred for life 
physically and those who will be mentally ' 
deprived iac the remainder of their years. And 
there are those who get a natural "high" when 
remembering. But they came back, in whatever 
state. And if you're one of the cmes who did ~ 
Thank God. How lucky you are! You're alive, 
maybe not tdally well, but alive. 

There are those who are a little of neither ~ 
alive or well. The still missing, the POWs are 
often swept under the rug. It's the age-dd 
syndrome. ..if there's something bad, let's turn 
our head, it'll go away. But THEY haven't, or 
shouldn't, and won't! They still exist in the minds 
of families they belong to ~ the families who 
write, phone, plead, and argue for more 
investigations. 

And they have a point. Patriotism is as great as 
mom and apple pie. The All- American boy 
still walks hand in hand with the All-American girl 
who serve this awntry and WE SHOJU^PT 
FORGET! 

y^ril 9 has been proclaimed as National 
POW/MIA Day. Let's not get into such a state 
this week that we forget that there are peqile who 
gave so much and asked so little. One things 's 
guaranteed, if they are aUve, if they can walk, 
taUcor even think... they think of us. 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know ! 

The Virginia Beach Sun welcome and encoura^ lett«s to the editor on any and all Virginia Beach 
issues, as well as any <^ba issues, questions or comxms affecting the well being of the Virginia Beach 
community. Letters should be typed, double spaced and include the writers name, address and telephone 
number. Mail letten to The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. R(»anont Ro^, Virginia Beach, Va. 234S2. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



13S SoHth RfMemoiit Roid, Viwgiah Brf h, Va. 23452 Pbone (804) 486-3430 
USPS-660-140; Pablishcd Wedncsdiys 



HaaciB^lsr 



GrttGoMfwk 
Editor 



RkhardW.Coani.Sr. 
Geocral Manager 



Within Tidewater Area 

One Year $9 

All Other Areas 

OneYear-$ll 

Two Years -$17 

Seoml Oass Postage is paid at Lynnhaven Station, 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

7%r I^AjMs &«cA Am !■ a aieiiiber of Tkc Vh|Mi Bnck ChMBbcr of ComMitc 



>l 



- i ■ > 

Viroinia Beach Happeninss This Week 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 6, 1983 '3 

Send your hippenings to The Virginia 
Beach Sun, 138 S. RusemonI Road, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



Wednesday 



</^ 



The Virginia Beach Dctachmcftt of the Marine 
Corps League, wifi hold its monthly meeting 
Wednesday April 6 at 8 p.m. at the Ramada Inn- 
North, 57th and Atlantic Avenue. 

All Marines, active or retired, or have served in 
the Marine Corps, are welcomed to attend. The 
Marine Corps League is a non-profit, veterans 
organization. 

The Auxiliary Unit will meet the same night at 
7:30, at 3848 S. Plaza Trail. 



PrM DialMtM ••riM Sst 

Virginia Beach General Hospital is sponsoring a 
three-part series on diabetes beginning at 7:30 
p.m., on Wednesday, April 6. The series will con- 
tinue on the following Wednesday nights (April 13 
and 20), also at 7:30 p.m. 

Topics of discussion include general care and an 
overview of the disease, medications currently in 
use, and dietary hints for controlling the disease. 
The program is open to diabetics, families of 
diabetics, and others interested in the condition. A 
physician's referral is not needed to attend the free 
series at the hospital. 

Call 481-8183 for reservations. 



"Heartworm Disease," a free pet care lecture at 
the Virginia Beach Campus of Tidewater Com- 
munity Collie, will be presented from 7:30 to 
8:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 6. 

For more information, contact 428-6201 . 



Thursday 



Pr«c«ptor Chapter m—H 

Preceptor Alpha Xi Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi 
will meet at the home of Nancy Fasteson, 5516 
Carolanne Terrace, on Thursday, April 7, at 7:30 
p.m. Final plans will be made for the birthday 
party for the children at Hope Haven on April 19. 

Representatives for the Tidewater City Council 
of Beta Sigma Phi meeting on April 14 will be 
Diana Pettit and Gwen Stace. After the business 
meeting, the cultural program on Investments will 
be presented. , , 

For more information call 4S6-1764 or 499- 
3367. 



Friday 



•lv« Mooil At Oc«aiMi 

The American Red Cross Bloodmobile will 
collect blood on Friday, April 8 at NAS Oceana, 
base theater, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 



Saturday 



wow Pl«a Market 

The Fourteenth Annual Women of Wesleyan 
Flea Market is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on 
Saturday, April 9, in the gymnasium at Virginia 
Wesleyan College. 

Space reservations cost $20 each. There are only 
60 spaces still available. Only the money paid for 
the space reservations goes to the Women of 
Wesleyan. Individual sellers keep all the proceeds 
from their sales. 

The Women of Wesleyan is a 15 year-old 
organization of Tidewater area women who have 
been assisting the college since its first year of 
operation. Primarily through their fiea markets 
they have raised over $35,000 which has been used 
to purchase library books, picnic tables and ben- 
ches, new furniture for the lounges and the 
student center, a Wurlitzer piano for the music 
department, and a greenhouse for the college's 
botany program. 

For space reservations or for further infor- 
mation about the WOW Flea Market call Virginia 
Wesleyan College at 461-3232, ext. 287. 




CARRIER, 
HELP! 

2 Reasons 



To Buy Carrier 
Cooling NOW! 



Adult Clots Ruvtow 

The Virginia Beach Department of Parks and 
Recreation will present the Winter Adult Class 
Review on Saturday, April 9, at 8 p.m. in the 
Kempsville Playhouse. The Kempsville Playhouse 
is located in the Virginia Beach Recreation Cen- 
ter/Kempsville. 

The Review will feature performances by the 
students of the adult winter classes. The students 
will entertain and show the scope of classes 
available. Exotic belly dancers, Polynesian dan- 
cers, square dancers, aerobic dancers and more 
will demonstrate what they have learned over eight 
weeks. 

The Review is free and open to the public; 
reservations are not necessary. A reception will 
follow. Foi" more'infdnnaftbiii calf AtJUlt Serviced 
at 495-1892. '' ', 

Public 
Hearing 

The Virginia Beach 
City Council will hold a 
public hearing on the 
1983/84 Operating 
Budget on Wednesday, 
April 27 at 7 p.m. in the 
Pavilion Theater, 1000 
19th Street. 

Copies of the budget 
may be reviewed at any 
branch of the City's 
Public Library system, 
the City Clerk's Office 
(Municipal Center), and 
the Ofnce of Public In- 
formation (Municipal 
Center). 




^.^ 



1. Savings 

Get the year's best prices 
plus high efficiency to cut your 
cooling costs.. 

2. FREE 

With the purchase of a Carrier 
Air Conditioning or Heat 
Pump. We hand you a line with 
no strings attached — a Uniden 
Model EX3000 Cordless 
Telephone Free! 

Builders, developers not 
eligible. 

One per ciistomer. 

Financing Now A vailable 




"Mornings At Seven," by Paul Osborn, will 
play through April 16, at The Little Theatre of 
yirginla Beach. Performances will be on weeken- 
ds, with an 8:30 p.m. curtain on Friday and 
Saturday nights and a 3 p.m. matinee on Sunday, 
April 10. 



NBC Mak«-«p Artist CoMlng 

Lee Baygan, make-up chief at N.B.C. studio, 
will present a detailed lecture and slide presen- 
tation on every aspect of theatrical make-up on 
Saturday, April 9 at 3 p.m. at the Kempsville 
Playhouse. Kempsville Playhouse is located in the 
Virginia Beach Recreation Center/Kempsville, 
8(X) Monmouth Lane. 

The Performing Arts Unit of the Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks & Recreation will present 
Baygan in this lecture. Baygan is the author of two 
successful books: Techniques of Three Dimen- 
sional Make-up and Make-up for Theatre, Film & 
Television. He has been Director of Make-up at 
N.B.C. since 1966 and has twice been nominated 
for Emmy Awards. His credits include make-up 
for John Forsythe, Melvyn Douglas, Julie Harris, 
Peter Ustinov, Claire Bloom, Genevieve Bujold, 
Roddy McDowell, E.G. Marshall, Maureen 
O'Hara and Dustin Hoffman. 

Admission to the slide presentation/lecture will 
be $1. Reservations are suggested and may be 
made by calling 495-1892. 

Ptychic Pair At J«witli Mother 

The Jewish Mother restaurant will present a 
psychlt fair on Saturday, April 9 for the benefit of 
the Virginia Beach SPCA. There will be astrology, 
numerology, and tarot readings available. 

Get a reading at the Jewish Mother from noon 
till 7 p.m. - Laskin and Pacific at the oceanfront. 
For further information contact Nancy Fantone, 
422-5430, or Martha Rapoport, 425-0964. 



Sunday 



•twdmita Honored By DAB 

The Lynnhaven Parish Chapter, National 
Society Daughters of the American Revolution 
will honor members who have joined the Chapter 
during the 1980-1983 administration at a tea on 
Sunday, April 10, at 2 p.m. at the home of Mrs. 



John B. Bates, 4316 Ewell Road. 

Special guests will be the recipients of awaids 
presented by the Chapter during the 1982-1983 
year. Co-hostess and chairman of arrangements is 
Mrs. William Schullion, Jr. 

Award recipients are: Outstanding American 
History student Janice Pascua of Green Run High 
School and Craig Hudson of Kempsville High 
School; Good Citizen Awards are: Kathy Murden 
of Tabernacle Baptist School, Miss Tary Ehlfe of 
Kempsville High School and' Jennifer Ray Pascua 
of Green Run High School. Mr. William W. Eley 
who was presented the National DAR History 
Award Medal and was the chapter's nominee for 
the Outstanding American History Teacher con- 
test, will also be honored. 

Mrs. William H. Austin, Jr. a member of the 
Adam Thproughgood Chapter and the (immedime 
past) Virginia DAR Recording Secretary will 
speak on "Know The DAR." 



Monday 



CoRtribwts To SvmliiiM B«vu« 

The Virginia Beach Jaycees has announced that 
the Jaycees are once again supporting the Sun- 
shine Revue and Talent Show, for the benefit of 
the children at the center for effective learning. 
Any business organization that would like to con- 
tribute goods to this effort may call John K. Had- 
jikakos at 428-5 124. 



Tuesday 



list viMM mn vM Moot 

The USS Cari Vinson Enlisted Wives Club will 
hold its monthly meeting on the second Tuesday 
of every month at 7 p.m. at the NOB Ship and 
Shore Building. Babysitting is available. 

Call 486-8635 for more information. 



Blading CovmII Workshop 

The Virginia Beach Reading Council will 
present a "Make 'n Take" workshop on Tuesday, 
April 12 from 4:40 to 8:30 p.m; at the Indepen- 
dence Jtmior ^ligh. School Cafetorium. 

Activities will include basic skills in vocabulary, 
deciding, and comprehension. Dinner can be pur- 
chased. Bring scissors, pencils, rulers, water-based 
markers, pictures and a vocabulary list. 

Call Martha Cisney, 481-4045 for more infor- 
mation. 



UpcOTung 



IF YOU ARE A MA TURE 
DEPENDABLE HOUSEWIFE, ABLE 
TO WORK WITHOUT SUPERVISION 
WE DO HAVE A JOB FOR YOU! 

Guaranteed '3.35 per hour working from the com- 
fort of your home. Good worker may earn as 
mugh as '5.00 per hour. All you have to do is call 
local housewives for used tax deductable 
household discards, to support local D.A. V. 

NO SELLING 461-1473 



SALES* SERVICE •REPAIRS 
SPECIALIZING IN HEAT PUMPS 
SHEET METAL WORK 
SERVICE CONTRACTS 



CALL TODAY FOR A FREE EVALUATION 

OF YOUR HOME 

Find out how much a Carrier heat pump can save you. 



547-4444 

AMPMOR ELECTRIC CORP. 

' "'■'123 Wayne Ave. • Great Bridge • Chesapeake 





SUPERIOR 
BUILDERS 



Specializing in Porch 

Enclosures & Florida Rooms 

also 

•Cvstooi Room AddiUons 

•Room Addition SMb 

•Bathroom RemoMing •Garages 

•Vinyl & Aluminom Siding 

•MuoB^ Fireplan •Solar A Glass Rooms 

•All Types Concrete Worit •Termite Damage 

•Moisture Control 

O VER 20 YRS. EXPERIENCE A STA TE REG. 



FREE ESTIMATES 422-0500 



Beacher Keim 
Is Selected 

David Brent Keim, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Simon 
Keim of Rudyard Lane in 
Virginia Beach, Va., has 
recently been selected as 
one of nine Presidential 
Scholars at Gardner- 
Webb College in Boiling 
Springs, N.C. 

The scholarships are 
awarded on the basis of 
outstanding academic 
achievement, demon- 
strated leadership and 
commitment to service. 



The Ladies Auxiliary, Fleet Reserve 
Association, Kempsville Unit 99 will hold its mon- 
thly meeting on Wednesday, April 13 at 8 p.m., at 
the Eagles Lodge, 1061 Newtown Road, Virginia 
Beach. 

The Fleet Reserve Association, Kempsville 
Branch 99, will hold its monthly meeting on Wed- 
nesday, April 13, at 8 p.m. at the Eagles Lodge, 
1061 Newtown Road, Virginia Beach. 



•oM TMTMiMMt ••# Por May 

The First Annual Virginia Beach Crime Solvers 
golf tournament will be held on Friday, May 6 a' 
the Hell's Point Golf Course. It begins at 12:30 
p.m., followed by cocktails and buffet. 

Donation per player is SI 00. Funds will be used 
to help support Crime Solvers, which gives money 
awards for information on crimes. 

Call 427-9205 for more information. 



Ad«llBM At LyiinlHiv«ii Mall 

The Sweet Adelines, Inc., will hold a mass smg 
on Friday, April 15 at Lynnhaven Mall at 4 p.m. 
For more information call 497-7000. 



Colonial School Of Coblers And 
Shoe Restoration, LTD. 

6220 Indian River Road 
Virginia Beacli, Va., 23464 

Phone 420-9206 




1^3.00 OFF 1 


'1.00 OFF 


" WHOLE OR 1 
HAU- SOLES 1 
ANDHKEI.S 1 


LADIES' 

1 HEELUt'l^ 

1 (LMUPyri) 
WI*Cm»m 


WMCMpM 


1 b«ta>A»i.M.mi 



"It is always with the 
best intenticms that the 
worst work is done." 

Oscar Wilde 




MICHAEL F. 

FASANARO, JR. 

Attorney 
At Law 

461-6121 

5 Koger Exe* utive Center 

SUITE 220 
Norfolli, Va. 23502 



■■ 



4 Virginia B^ch Sun, A|^l 6, 1^3 

Libraries Of History 

Fraoctt Land came to Virginia Beadi ptkr to 1643. 

Evidently he protpered, for in 1634 he bad taud 
holdings totalling over 1,000 acres. It unu Francs Lnd 
lU who inherited the piopeny aad b it believed tlutt ^ 
built the hoi»e in 1732. Frands ID was a O^tuan m tbe 
Ctenty Militia, a Vestryman, Church Warden, and a 
Gentknian imtisx ot the Court. M hk (te«tb in 173S, 
the UukI passed to his descendaau. SometiiBe aroud 
the late ISOO's the boiBe passed oitt of the Land £uni]y. 
Then in 1954, Mr. Colin Studds bought the boitte and 
tinned it into a dress shop. He (Wanted a formal r«e 
garden in front of tte house. He did a lot of restoration, 
keeping the front of the iKXise, the hall aixl downstairs 
roonu tte way they may have been 250 years ago. 

Eventually he gave the house to his daughter niio 
lost it to the Industrial Security CorporatioQ. Before Mr. 
StiKids' daughter gave up tbe house, an auctioa wu 
held and the house was stripped to the bore wa&. The 
shrubs and tt^ rose bushes were also sold. In 1975, the 
C3ty of Virginia Beach bought the house with its 
remaining 35 acres. The plan rf the house is tyiMcaUy 
Georgian, with a widtf hail from front to back and 2 
rooms on either sick. The walls are 18 iiKtes thick and 
laid in Flemish bond. The mortar which has stood so 
well was made of ground oyster shells mixed with pig 
hair. The gambrel roof is typical ol the early 18th 
century. 

WcMialliMae-ca.1691 

The Weblin house has been Usted on tte Natiaoal 
Register of Historic Places. It is a good example of 
what became biown as the Virginia styk of die 17th 
and 18th century farmhouse. Architecturally it beka^ 
to a small group of pre-Georgian form houses wUcfa 
have similar characterutia in chimney, hall and parlor 
plans. This arrangemem evolved from late medieval 
farm houses of the western and upland regions of 
England, and was used by many Virginia settlers who 
came fron that area. The usual 1 -story form was fouwi 
so suitable to the Virginia climate and life style that it 
became known as the Virginia style. 

The house is named for John Weblin, ton-b-law of 
Captain Thomas Lambert, who in 1633 obtained a grant 
for what is probably the Lambert's Point section of 
Norfolk today. The house is said to be built before 1671, 
and one estimate has placed the date at 1653 or tightly 
earlier. 

The Weblin House was once, like the Thoroughgood 
and Lynnhaven houses, a story and a half A-roofed 
dwelling, a device cdonists used to gain an extra room 
upsuirs while avoiding the added tax on a full 2-itory 
house. The roof was changed at some point to a more 
roomy gambrel, but the original A is still visible on the 
north side of the house. The brick of the rear and one 
end are laid in English bond which later gave way to the 
IMttem of Flemish bond introduced in England in 1666. 
The Flemish bond appears in the chimney's sides and 
are covered in some type of glaze. At night wlwn car 
lights shine on it, the bricks glow in the dark. The walls 
^the house are 16 inches think. The bricks are rough 
and irregular, indicating a date when the coionists had 
not yet developed skilled brickmakers. 

Old DonatkNi Chardi - 1639 

Old Donation was known as the Mother Church of 
Lynnhaven I^rish ai^ its histon be|jitu in. 1639. like 
att Episcopal Churches during the Revotutioaary War. 
it suffered because it was the Qiurch (^England, While 
clergymen were Rt^alisu, congregations were split in 
loyalty. 

h was first located in 1939 at Church Point, the 
present site of Bayville Farms on Shore Drive. Dim to 
the flooding of this location, the church eroded and the 
cemetery collapsed into the river. A new site was then 
found and a church was built in 1692. In 1736 a larger 
building was erected but tragedy again struck (M 
Donation in 1866 when a fire destroyed the buifaUng 
leaving only the walls standing. Thanks to the initiative 
of Thurmer (foggard and his descendants, who 
observed a yearly service in its ruins, the church was 
saved. 

According to Reverend Tucker, present rector of the 
church, it was necessary to hold a service a^e a year so 
that the church would continue to maintain title to the 
property. In 1916 the CXd Church was restored just as it 
had been originally. The Reverend Allfriend, who was 
responsible for the restoration, is buried in the aisle ot 
the church. The name of Old Donatioq probably 
originated from the gift of the Rector, Reverend Robert 
Dixon, hi his will of 1776 he gave to the Parish his land 
known as Donation Farm, for the endowment ct a free 
school for orphan boys. 

The historic homes slide show is an ongoing project. 
An update, begun in 1982, is still in {vogress and 
identification of. and information about, sites for 
possible inclusion is encouraged. Reservations for 




Virginia Beach Maritime Historical Mtdseum 

Rumble Plans Living History Book 



The Breeches Buoy, on- 
ce used to transport Ship- 
men to the Virginia Beach 
shore, is sought by Rumble 



By Greg Goldfarb 

Sun E4itor 

Richard E. Rumble, 
tucked away in hk third 
story nortlKast <rfik:e at 
the Virginia Beach Mari- 
time Historic^ Museum, 
sits behind the desk 
imagining and planning to 
present Virginia Beach's 
maritime history. 

From his (rflice, the 
museum direaor aiKl re- 
tired naval oKcet may 
look through his window 
overlooking the Atlantic, 
and envision kmg ago 
shipwrecks, lifesaving 
eflbrts, aiKi how life sav- 
ing stations from Cape 
Henry to False Cape com- 
bined efforu to assist 
ships and men in distress. 

Rumble wants to give 
his memories life. He 
wants to take a geiKral- 
themed maritime museum 
and moid it into a reahstic 
diary of Virginia Beach's 
nautical and maritime his- 
tory. TIk museum now 
has about S25O,000 in 
inventory, comprised of 
about 500 different mari- 
time artifacts. 

Rumble irfans, with tte 
ImIp of a recently hired 
design expert, to elimi- 
nate duplication of some 
items, and present the 
remaining relics, such as 
old compasses and tele- 
scopes in exhibits demon- 
strating how they were 
used. 

Two items in which 
Rumble is particularly 
eager to obtain for his 
visual history book arc the 
Breeches-Bu(^, used to 
transport shipmen from 
disabled ships to the 
shore, and a beach appa- 
ratus cart, used to haul in 
the line over which the 
Breeches Buoy was used. 

Currently, there are six 
life saving stations along 
Virginia Beach's shore- 
line, some operational, 
some not. They are: Cape 
Henry. Seataclc, Dam 



Neck MiOs. Littk bland. 
Fake C^pe and Wiah 
Woocb. Years ago they all 
cooperattd and coama^- 
cated, by telephone and 
telegraph, in assisting 
disabled or beached 
shi|». But this aspect of 
the beach is but one 
among many which Rum- 
ble hopes to incorparate in 
to the museum, if the 
artif^xs can be fouiKl and 
acquired. 

Ideally the mmeum, 
after it is renKxkled, will 
include the fdlowing 
features: overview of the 



history (rf Virginia Beach; 
history <rf the Seatack 
Station, which is also the 
museum; hista7 of the 
five other stations; causes 
of shipwrecks; rescue 
techniques arui crafts; the 
war years; proteaion of 
commerce; Virginia sea 
pilots; and the origin ot 
Ufe saving efforts. 

Tbe museum is a pri- 
vately funded, non-profit 
foundation. U receives 
about one-third of its 
budget from the city, and 
the rest comes from cor- 
porate givings, museum 



memberships, museomi 
admission charges and 
gift shop sales. Thif 
year's budget is about 
$100,000. Next year's is 
projected at $117,000, Tbe 
museum has a 27-niember 
board of directors; jwesi- 
dent is Richard Balak. 
Honorary board members 
are U.S. Caigressman G. 
William Whitehurst; 
former mayor and present 
city councilman Henry 
McCoy; former city 
manager and current 
Portsmouth city manager, 
George ^anbury; and 
local writer Jim Stiff. 




Maritime Historical Musenm Dhtctor Richard E. RumUc 



-^ 



presentation of "The Way We Were..." for dates 
following June 15th can be made by calling Dorothy 
Williams or the Reference Division at 464-9485. 

If you are interested in reading more on the subject, 
you might try the following books: "America: Homes 
for Englishmen in the State of Virginia;" "Charity, lu 
Past and lu People;" "dd Houses in Princess Anne 
Virginia;" "The Pictorial History <rf Virginia Beach;" 
or "The Beach: A History of VTirginia Beach, 
Virginia." 



P«fli Arto PMthral ApfrfkatlMi 

The Virginia Beach Department of Parks and 
Recrration is currently taking application requests 
for the ninth annual Virginia Beach Folk Arts 
Festival. 

The festival is a celebration of our rural and 
cultural heritage; therefore, traditional crafts are 
preferred. The 1983 Folk Arts Festival will be held 
August 6 and 7 at Princess Anne Park. The 
festival will be held from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. 
Application deadliiM is May IS. 1983. 

If interested in exhibiting in the festival, contact 
the Virginia Beach Department of Parks and 
Recreation 467-4884. 



Cape Henry 
Women Meet 

Ihe G.F.W.C. Cape 
Henry Wanan's Club of 
Virginia Beach will hdd 
its luncheon meeting on 
Thursday, April 14 at 11 
a.m. in Tandom's Pine 
Tree Inn on Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. 

According to Mrs. 
Qifton Doxey, Jr. pro- 
gram chairman, a play 
called "Mospy's Birthday 
Party" will be presented 
by club members in (xle- 
bration of the club's 29th 
anniversary. 

The Cape Henry 
Woman's Club wa.s organ- 
ized and federated in the 
spring of 1954 with 99 
active members and two 
associate members. 

Hostesses for April will 
be Mrs. Elbert B. Cox and 
Mrs, T, Cully Lanchantin. 
Table decwalions will be 
provided by Mrs. James 
G. Kellam and Mrs. Fred 
J. Young. 

Reservations must be 
made by April 12 by 
caitattmg Mrs. Gecrge S. 
Do/ier, telephone 
140-3192. 

There will be a "Special 

Sill [If I (■ ' iill'- 



What's Cooking At 
The Circle? 



2" NEW YORK 
SIRLOIN STEAK 

$149S 

The best quality 
steak in Tidewater 



LIVE MAINE 
LOBSTER 

$1095 

l'/2 lb. stuffed with 
jumbo crab meat 



EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 



One Urge Crab Cake '5'* 
Fried Scallops *6'' 

LUNCHEON 

BUFFET 



$120 



• Santeed Chicken Livers 

• Fried or Broiled Trout 

Tacsday • 
^lantey 



tA$9 



•6 



2S 



Full Mcirfs Served • 8:30 a.m. • 2 p.m. 
Tuesday thru Saturday • Closed Monday 

NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT 

Ray Brown At The Piano 



IN CHESAPEAKE 

THERE IS ONE RESTAURANT 
THAT PROVIDES.... 

•ATMOSPHERE 

YOU WILL TRULY LOVE 

►SERVICE 

THAT'S TRADITIONALLY 
"SOUTHERN" 

•A CHEF 

CREATIVE & PROFESSIONAL 

•FOOD 

THAT TANTALIZES 

CEDAR COVE INN 

100 Fernwood Farm Road 

547-3022 *.^"<^, nam 

^y\ TO 

Baiiltfitid Bhd. J | | 



Banquet Room 
For Fifty 



1 o Orni BnUgc/ 



pm 





•f APOOO MMTAUflANT 



3010 High Slr^t 
Portsmotolh 



397-81«k> 




Pkaw CaM for Rcwrvadoas 
On Fri., Sal., A Sunday 

547-3022 



^-3*^ 



//fl/ 



rvw w www W 999 t m 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 6, 1983 5 



Vir3inia Beach City Council By L**cahiii 

Beach Council Actions 




JolMA.Baui 
Bfawkwalcr 



NsK} A. Creech 
At-Lartc 



Barbara M.Hcnky Harold Hetochober H.Jack Jennings 

PuBgo Al-Ur«e Lynnhaven 



Louis R. JoMs 
Bayii^ 






Robert G.JoM* 
Ai-Lart* 



W. H. KilcMn, lit 
Virginia Beach 



RebaS. McClanan 
Princen Anne 



J. Henry McCoy, Jr. 
Kcmpsvlllc 



Meyera Oberndorf 
Al-Largc 



Meetine Date: Monday, April 4, 1983 
Budget Workshop 10 a.m. Kitchin, McCoy absent 

School Board 

School Board representatives meet with Council to discuss 
school operating budget for 1983-84. ^ ^ 

AntUipaffod Rovomiot 

Heischober questions the receipts from the abandoned 
vehicle franchise. The city anticipates collections of $1 ,690 for 
1983-84 which at approximately $100 a vehicle represents 16 or 
!7 cars a year where, Heischober said, neighboring cities collect 
$25,000 to $50,000 a year. 

Jennings asks whether the $3, 150 anticipated in bicycle licen- 
se fees justifies administrating the program which must cost 
three or four times as much. 

* Informal Session, 

McCoy absent 

Annlvorsary Colobrof ion 

Henley reports on plans for the anniversary celebration 
which will Uke place the week of April 24. 

■oach OrdinaiMOS 

Jennings asks for ordinances pertaining to restrictions on the 
public beach on Chesapeake Bay in the Westminster-Canter- 
bury Homcarw be placedon next Monday's agcnri a . . 

iMtorln PliMMkil ttatoMont 

Assistant to the City Manager Giles Dodd reports revenues 
so far this year are ahead of expectations except for automobile 



licenses, cigarette taxes and the hotel and meal tax which are 
not behind to a great degree. 

Auditor 

City Manager Thomas H. Muehlenbeck and Dodd, finance 
director, discuss procedure for selecting cliy auditor for the 
_next three years. 

Navy's Porpotod Landing 

Craft Air Cushion (LC AC) 

Baso And Training Boaclios 

Jennings announces a change of mind and speaks against 
having the operation in Virginia Beach. 

Transit Roport 

Creech presents a report on a visit to San Diego, Calif, as a 
guest of the Tidewater Transit Districi Commission with Mc- 
Coy, a member of the TTDC, and a group from this area lo 
study the light rail system and other facets of the city's 
economic development. 

Marina Logislation 

Creech recommends that Council support Senate Bill 38 
which concerns Workmen's Compensation payment for 
marina employees. 



iK Executive Session 



1:30 p.m. McCoy Absent 
Discussion of personnel, legal, financial and real 
estate matters. 



RE-INTRODUCING THE NEWLY REMODLED 



ANTASTIC 




ENWICK'S 



Virginia Beach 



RESTAURANT AND TAVERN 



IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR SOMEWHERE DIFFERENT TO GO FOR 
1 1 iNrH on DINNER « FENWICK'S 



FUN'FANTASTIC FOOD'FAST SERVICE 



APRIL 



X-RAVES 4th & 5th • STREET TALK 11th & 12th 25th & 26th 
STATES 18th • BLUE SPARKS 19th 



Plus Live Acoastic Entertainment • 7 Days A Week 



Come see our newly remodeled dining room ! ! ! 

iVe're not just talking through our toothpicks. You 'II need two hands 
and II napkins to finish off just one ofFenwick 's ^w^^f^/f "ff""™, „^ 
sensations. TRY OUR SATURDA Y AND SUNDAY BRUNCH 11 AM-3 PM 

-SUNDAY IS FAMILY DAY AT FENWICK'S! 

Featuring: 
QUEEN CUT PRIME RIB WITH SALAD/POTATO M.95 
AND, FOR THE KIDS, A HOTDIGGITY DOG OR HAMBURGER 
WITH FRENCH FRIES & A COKE ONLY ,990 



DON'T FORGET! 

OUR 
ALL-U-CAN 

EAT 
SALAD BAR 



j Buy any Entree at Regular Price And 



It 



4621 N. WItchduck Rd. 
Virgiiiia Beach 

490-0581 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Get The Second Of Equal Value 
Or Less Absolutely 

FREli* With this Coupon. 

Expires May 1,1983 

Catering and Banquet Facilities 



i^ Formal Session 

2:15 p.m. McCoy absent 



Resolution recognizing "Tour (Bicycle) of America Day" • 

Friday, Aprils. 

Resolution recognizing services of Frederick Napolitano, 
past president of the National Home Builders Association. 



if Resolution 



Resolution authorizing the City Manager to enter into a con- 
traci for an independent audit of the City of Virginia Beach for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1983. (This matter was deferred 
for one week on March 28. 1983) Deferred for one week 9-0. 
Creech, McCoy absent. 

if Consent Agenda 

• Resolution in Recognition of "Tour of America Day" - 
Friday, April 8, 1983. Approved 10-0. 

•Resolution in Recognition of Fred Napolitano recently 
retired President of National Association of Home Builders. 
Approved 10-0. 

•Resolution in Recognition of Cleia Liverman who served 
as General Registrar from January 1, 1976 until January 31, 
1983. Approved 10^. 

• Resolution accepting Long-Term Care Plan for FY-84 and 
directing the Chairman of the Long-1 erm Care Coordination 
Committee to submit it to the Stale. Approved 10-0. 

• Resolution authorizing the charging off of uncollectible ac- 
counts totaling $70,682.90. Approved 8-2. McClanan. Ober- 
ndorf dissenting. 

•Ordinance to Amend and Reordain Section 18-75 (b) of the 
Code of the City of Virginia Beach. Virginia, pertaining to con- 
tractors and persons constructing houses for subsequent sale or 
rental. Approved 10-0. ,,, 

•Ordinance, on second reading, to authorize one new full- 
time position in the Community Development Housing 
Rehabilitation Section. Approved 10^. 

•Ordinance to authorize a temporary encroachment into a 
portion of the right of way known as Ocean Avenue (the 
Boardwalk area) to Mr. John C. Rogers of Sand Dollar 
Associates. Approved 10-0. 

•Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity: Dr. 
David W. Best - Virginia Beach Dialysis Center. Approved 10- 
0. 

•Raffle Permits: Kellam High School Band Parents' 
Association, NAS Oceana Youth Development Program. Ap- 
proved 10-0. 

• Request of the City Treasurer for Tax Refunds in the 
amount of $1892.57. Approved 10-0. 

if Planning Items 

•Application of John C. Aspinwall for a conditional use 
permit for mini-warehouses on a 4.4 acre parcel located along 
the south side of Shore Drive, west of Independence Boulevard 
(Bayside Borough). (This matter was deferred for one week on 
March 28, 1983). Letter from the City Manager transmits the 
recommendation of the Planning commission for approval. 
Approved 6-4. Henley. Kitchin, McClanan and Oberndorf 
dissenting. 

•Application of Runnington Investment Corporation for a 
change of zoning from l-l Light Industrial District to B-4 
Resort Commercial District on a 6,381 -square foot parcel 
located along the south side of Pinewood Drive, west of 
Mediterranean Avenue (Virginia Beach Borough). (This matter 
was deferred for one week on March 28. 1983). Utter from the 
City Manager transmits the recommendation of the Planning 
Can'missionifDi approval. Deferred to April 18., 1(^0, v, , , 

•Ordinance closing, vacating and discontinuing a 24-foot 
unnamed right-of-way in the petition of Richard H. Kline 



BUSINESS MAN'S SPECIAL 



PRINTING 



ONE MONTH ONLY! 



59. 



95 

•TOTAL PRICE 



1,000 Letterhead 

On 20 lb. Bond, White 

1,000 Envelopes 

>riO Business, While 

Black Ink 



NO CHARGE FOR 



• Negatives 
•Plal» 



• Typsetting 
• CompostiUon 



CALL BRAD 486-8700 




RESORTS ICAILINO. LTD 



2439 OcoMC Ave. 
Virginii BcKh 



(Lynnhaven Borough). (This matter was deferred for one week 
on March 28, 1983). Letter from the City Manager iransmiis 
the recommendation of the Planning Commission, and the 
Viewers concur, for approval. Appro%ed 10-0 

•Ordinance closing, vacating and discontinuing a ptniiun oi 
Lynn Shores Drive in the petition of Thoma)> O. and Irma C. 
Harty and Thomas M. and Rita K. Vojtek (Bayside Borough) 
(This matter was deferred indefinitely on March 21 , 1983), 1 ei- 
ter from the City Manager transmits the recommendation df 
the Planning Commission, and the Viewers concur, for ap- 
proval. Approved 10-0. 

■Ordinance closing, vacating and Uisconiinumf a poriiuii dl 
a 30-foot right of way on the west side of Indian A\cnue. south 
of Maryland Avenue (Lynnhaven Borough) in the peiiiion ol 
Lands End Associates, a Virginia Limited Partnership. 1 eiicr 
from the City Manager transmits the recommendation for final 
approval as on November 1, 1983. Council approsed this 
closure. Approved 10-0. 

if Appointments 

•Personnel Board reappointed Albert Bonnc). Ruby 
Christian and Charles W. Gary 10-0. 

if Unfinished business 

Cox Cabl« 

DiKUSsion on Cox Cable rate increase procedure continued 
from March 28 meeting. Continued until after executive 
session. 

LaadiiHP Cra** ■•tolutien 

Resolution opposing location of Navy Landing Craft Air 
Cushion base and operations in Virginia Beach scheduled for 
next Monday's Council meeting. 10-0. 

ImtMW Va. Modical School 

Virginia Society for Human Life supports City Manager 
Thomas H. Muehlenbeck's deletion of $250,000 for ihc 
Eastern Virginia Medical School from the 1983-84 budget. The 
Society's support is based on opposition to the in vitro facility 
had supporting genetics lab. 

Boaotif Icatlon Profoct 

Kitchin asks for staff recommendation and briefing on 
Atlantic Avenue Beautification project . 

if Executive Session 

4 p.m. 

•Discussion of Cox Cable price increase, and other legal, 
nnancial real estate and personnel matters. 

if Formal Session (Continues) 

Motion to direct city attorney to seek such legal action to en 
join past and future billings for the recently imposed 81 -cent 
rate increase and royalty fee by Cox Cable which was not san- 
ctioned or approved "by the Virginia Beach City Council. Ap- 
proved 10-0. 

if Adjournment 

Meeting adjourned at 5:40p.m. 



Debating Beacher 



James Madison Univer- 
sity seniw, Dane Buts- 
«ihkas of Virginia Beach, 
will'cdrti^fe at the Nat- 




ional Debate TcHirnament, 
being held from March 30 
to April 2 in Colorado 
Springs, Colo. 

Sixty-two teams will 
participate in the tourna- 
ment, including teams 
from Harvard, Dart- 
mouth, the University of 
Southern California, 
Northwestern University 
and the University of 
North Carolina. 



Gas Up • Fill up with Kerosene 
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 



LYNNHAVEN 



Sixty - Six 
801 S. Lynnhaven Rd. 





We Don't 

Want The 

Shirt Off 

Your Back 

(Or, Your Pants) 



340-S4tNI 



Just 
Good Service 

At 
Great Prices 

Jerry Parker 
Owner 



Transmission • Brakes • Tune up 
• General Repairs • 






I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 






...— i-«*Save *2.00 With This Coupon" 

PLUS FREE SALAD BAR 

With Any "AH You Can Eat" Sit Down Buffet 



Fillet of Trout Golden Fried *4.M 

Fried Chicken Crispy *4.95 

Fried Fillet of Flounder 

Hometown Favorite ^-^ 

Fried Clam Strips Tender *7.95 

Fried Deviled Cnb In Natural SheU •8.95 
Fresh Fried Oysters In Season Select . •9.95 
Fried Shrimp GoWwi '9.95 



■» Lwi«. nto li m Tk«* teirtw ielirioM rtta are eoated 
Try •«■ aiKt aa4 yoa'M be 



«•••■••< 



MQBakyBKkittt* 

Crsb Cakes Our Own Homemade 

Maryland &yte 

S^C^ Shrimp P«l '«n yourself. 

Hot w coW 

Deep Sea Scallops if ym Uke fried 

Scallops, this is it 



'10.95 

•10.95 
»11.95 

•12.95 



^JlS^^y tor a«to-«. PMM lli* •rt,»««» «»^ ■ T^ y^"- 

«49Va Beach Blvd. 2406 E. Ultle Creek Ro«l, Norfolk • 583-3793 39W Turnpike Rd. 

op«ii*Ni.Tta»t^*»-*»^*- •*** rrt.*s.i.iM 



L— -iU^— --"Save •2.00 With Thb Ceiqmi. 



Portsmouth 
399-5838 



$ 



6 Virginia Beach Sun. April 6, 1983 

Cops 

Under 

Pressure 

Ccntinued from Pa«e I 
exaggeration of generality," Brazier said. "There's very 
much involved, and a lot of psychaitrists and 
psychologists are not police oriented. A matter of fact, 
one of the firms we're look "at proposed coming out and 
riding in the cars, and actually experience it to set exac- 
tly what's going on." 



m 



"In the last couple of years we've 
killed some people in the streets, 
. . . and we've had occasion to shoot 
two or three people. It has a big 
psychological impact on the officer" - 
Brazier 

In addition, police Chaplain coordinator, the 
Reverend D. R. Staton, is also conducting a study on 
police stress management. When he's concluded he'll 
offer his findings, in lecture fashion, to police officers. 

By the end of this summer, however. Brazier hopes to 
have a psychological program in place in which officers 
as well as thier families may participate. 

"A program whereby, we not only screen potential 
employees and applicants, but in-house people can also 
get benefit from it," he said, "such as counseling or 
things we consider to be work related problems that's 
the direct resuk of the stress that's created by this job." 

Until recently, there was no particular emphasis 
placed on the mental health of police officers in terms of 
occupational stress. 

"It was up to the man," Brazier said. "If he couldn't 
hack it . . ," 

If a police officer feels like he is "in trouble." or if he 
or she has a drinking, emotional or domestic problem, 
they may seek ouuide counseling. But the police depar- 
tment doesn't provide it. Neither did they encourage 
it. 

"I don't think they even thought about it," Brazier 
said. "It (Udn't occiu- to them. Psychological problems 
are kinda your problems. That's how the system in the 
past has looked at it. But that's all changing." 

Attitudes toward psychological testing are changing 
in part because the demands of police work are constan- 
tly increasing. The nature of the job creates a veil of 
restraint which shrouds and protects the officers from 
the public, and sometimes from themselves and their 
family. ,_;.._ ,. ,. , _, ... 

"It's the kind of jpb that sneaks up on you," Brazier 
said. "It's a gradual thing. It happens over a certain 
amount of time; that all of a sudden you don't have any 
friends except policemen. You can't live in the environ- 
ment we live in and not be affected. It's almost im- 
possible." 



"This uniform makes you the center 
of attention whether you like it or not. I 
understand how a black feels. No mat- 
ter who that individual is inside there, 
he's looking out through black skin 
which automatically draws attention to 
him. No matter who you are inside the 
uniform, the uniform's going to draw 
attention. And society expects certain 
things from that uniform" - Brazier 

In an already troubled world, police officers find 
themselves (interstage, cloaked in an uniform that is 
both loved and hated. 

"This uniform makes you the center of attention 
whether you like it or not," Brazier said. "I understand 
how a black feels. No matter who that individual is in- 
side there, he's looking out through black skin which 
automatically draws attention to him. No matter Vho 
you are inside the uniform, the uniform's going to draw 
the attention. And society expects certain things from 
that uniform. Never mind the individual that's in it." 

It is difficult to determine if a police officer has an 
emotional problem caused by stress, or an attitude 
problem causal by the work. The two are one in the 
same, some observers say. But either way, when an of- 
ficer's work is affect«i by his emotional demeanor, the 
results are usually negative. 

"You can't walk around and be wound up and up- 
tight," Brazia said. "It's either going to come out in 
the work somewhere or you're going to start treating 
people badly. Or you're g<Mng to start drinking real hard; 
or you're going to start burning that candle at both en- 
ds, lose your family, you're out on the street working 
eight to 10 hours a day and then when you're off, par- 
tying another eight or 10." 

Some critics might argue that police work won't turn 
a good person bad, or make a bad person worse. One 
may look at the police officer who has been assaulted 10 
times during the last year, but fail to notice his or her 
arrest rate or tl^ area in which the person works. 

"What's to say that the element hasn't made him 
brutal b«:ause he's existing in an element that requires 
it?" Brazier noted. 

Virginia B«ch Police Chief Charles Wall said the 
(kpartment tries to uproot any bad weeds before they 
ever become police officers. He also sakl that the depar- 
tment is "aggressively looking" at some sort of 
psychological assistance program. 



Gfc 



Cross-Lltes says: 

"To grow in the Lord: Feed 
on the word, rest in the 
Lord, exerci^ yourself info 
Godiiness" 




^ SLIM TIMEr 




(of Hair OcrigM) arc «K«ittfa« 
ttc peal McccM of Eacriy 
TlBcASIiaiTiaw. 



M IS NOW 

HELPS CURB APPETITE AND BURNS FAT. 
/ILL NATURAL! HELPS KEEP YOU HEALTHY. 

ENERGY TIME TM 

IS BEE POLLEN AND SPIRULINA TOGETHER 
DESIGNED TO GIVE YOU NATURAL ENERGY 
WHILE GETTING THE HEALTHFUL BENEFITS 
OF THESE TWO POWER PACK NATURAL 
FOODS. "BETTER LIFE" MEANS QUALITY 
LIVING. 



BtTTER LIFE 
QUALITY LIVING! 



MEANS 



463-3303 



For ihe nearesi locaiioiB 

in your area. Sold only in 

Tine hair salons. 



Brush 
Help 



Ed Obermeyer, art teacher at KemiM UndlBg 
Intermediate School, recently gave ailvh* to his 
student, Kevin Hamlet, [aow a stadent at KenpsvUle 
Juaior Iflgh] during Hamlet's denoBttratioa of air 
brush techniques at last year's show. 



Beach Garden Clubbers Are Busy 



By Virginia Gale 

Special To The Sun 

The activities of 
Virginia Beach garden 
clubbers are as varied as 
the flowers they grow. 
Aragona Garden Clubbers 
ar^ no exceptions. 
^/ Among them is one who 
counsels hospital patients 
in the theories of post- 
mastectomy trauma. She 
knows thereof she speaks, 
having been through such 
trauma herself. 

Irene Brown, the club's 
president, is a nationally 
accredited flower show 
judge. She also instructs in 
the growing of herbs, 
dramatizing with herb 
cookery on the spot. 

An artist, her range in- 
cludes work in oil, water- 
colors and acrylic. Some 
of her finest work is of 
flowers, meticulously ren- 
dered on fine china or 
Japanses porcelain. 

Ann Scharenberg, who 
volunteers time to the 
Aragona Coniinuniis 
Recreation Center, has 
been a traffic guard at 
Pembroke Elementary 
School for 17 years. She's 
a "fixture" at her Jerico 
Road "station," having 
remained to see "her 
children" come back with 
babies of their own. 

Evelyn Schmidt and 
Mary Ann Hitchings 
wheel patieilts to and from 
non-denominati(Mial chur- 
ch services every Thursday 
at Lake Taylor Hospital. 
Schmidt also delivers for 
Meals-on-Wheels. 

The list goes on. 

Robin Grillo recently 



became a member of the 
Davis Corner Station 02 
Rescue and Fire-fighting 
team. She qualified for 
rescue duty after eight 
hours of CPR (cardio 
pulmonary resuscitation) 
classes, and three months 
of classes (two times 
weekly; three hours each) 
in advanced first aid. 

"That was pure 
dedication," said Giillo, 
of the first aid. "1 had to 
drive all the way to San- 
dbridge for those classes." 

She volunteered for a 
night of duty recently, 6 
p.m. to 7:30 a.m. to get 
the feel of things; and has 
volunteered for six days in 
April. 



The station requires 
four hours of training a 
month "so you're always 
learning something. There 
are all kinds of classes you 
can take to advance your- 
self; EMT (Emergency 
Medical Training), cardiac 
technician, paramedics. 
They take time," said 
Grillo, "But I'm going to 
enroll in an EMT class 
when one comes up. 

"You know, it makes 
you feel really good about 
yourself. You're helping 
your community and your 
neighbors. And, who 
knows? It could be 
somebody close." 




Chess Tourney Winners 



The Virginia Beach 
Department of Parks and 
Recreation has announced 
the winners of the winter 
chess tournament held 
recently at the VirgNlia 
Beach Recreation Cerftefl' 
Kempsville: ' 

Twenty-one novide 
chess players of ill ages 
competed in this eight- 
hour Swiss Style tourna- 
ment. Each contestant 
played five games 
averaging one to one and e 
half hours of intense play. 

William Nichols and 
Vernon Harvey tied for 



first place. Each won four 
games and played one 
game ending in a stale- 
mate. Time clocks were 
then put in effect for a 10 
minute spee4i chess play- 
off William#liMN« tP<i|r^ 
first plao^laifd Veitami 
Harvey placed second. 



DISABLED 

AMERICAN VETERANS 

NEED YOUR HELP! 




FAST 




WE NEED: CLOTHING, 

Mens, Women's and Children's. 

Also, Books • Toys • Linens • Bedding 

• Housewares and Ciiina. 



CALL 461-4938 



And Dependabte, 
Pick Up Servki 



WE CAN USE PICTURES, TABLES, CHAIRS, 
LAMPS AND MUCH MORE. 



TAX DEDUCTIBLE 

Please Call 461-4938 
Today... Thank You. 





TICKETS 



The Great 

R}rd 

Mower 

Ciueawiay! 




FREE 42'INai ROTARY MOWER 

with puftlidbe »♦ dny Ford Lawn and Garden Tractor! 

f/eE 34-inch rotary MOWER 

fitti purchase of any Ford Lawn Tractor! 

FREE GRASS CATCHER 

with purchase of any Fwd Rider Mower Tractor! 

HURRY! OFFER EXPIRES 
JUNE 30, 1983 



Stevenson Ford Tractor, Inc. 

1792 South Military Highway 
Ckesapeake, Virginia, 23SXi 

420-4220 




SLOW FAST 
POKE. POCE 




If you're sWH using a rotesy cSrt, you're out of 
style. WhcfTs nrxsre. you're out of toucti. 

Vbu see, witti Touch CaHir^ you'll also 
hove occKs to many exdtir^ etecfronte 
services of ttie ftjture, 

Bririg your lifestyle ^d to speed. CaH 

ContirSwttal oTd oidw^foich ColliriQ service 
t0(±3y ^tou'H take to it very foet. 



€ 






L 



taJCft C«*I3 wiwce moy noi c» osolabl. m ol 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 6, 1983 



Cox Rate Hike 



continued from page I 

Hteischober whether he 
wanted to withdraw his 
Substitute motkm. 
i "No, sir," replied 
lfeischd>er. 

I Coun(;ilinan Jdm A. 
Baum, who has consis- 
liently decrud the use of 
i^ncii as a political 
forum suggested "that 
^either senatorial candi- 
date make a motion." 
; Heischt^r maintained 
hat his moticHi included 
etroaction. 

Oberndorf said that in 
:he interest of the city, 
she had no prdbltm with 
the issue and to "please 
let Baum make the 
potion." She then with- 
fdrew her motion. .The 
same motion she made 
s then offered by Baum 
a substitute motion to 



Hbischober's which had 
becone the primary 
motion. 

The motion approved 
unanimously by the ten 
members present was 
this: 

The city attorney is 
directed to seek such legal 
acticm to enjoin past and 
future bullings for the 
recehtly imposed 81 -cent 
rate, increase and/or 
rtqralty fee by Cox QiWe 
which was not sancticmed 
or approved by the Vir- 
ginia Beach Gty Council. 

Oberndorf said later the 
motion was prepared by 
Qty Attorney Dale Bim- 
son, herself and Gty 
Oerk Ruth Smith. 

The executive sesssion 
was called when Bims«i 
said he had problems with 
the motion made by Hei- 



schober. Heischober 
wanted to instruct the dty 
attorney to take wh^t legal 
procedures were neces- 
sary to enjan any further 
steps necessary for billing 
of superstatiuns and con- 
tradicted by the contract 
(Cox has with the city) and 
not payable by the sub- 
scribers. 

Both Oberndorf and 
Heischober wanted the 
same thing— to keep Cox 
frnn making additional 
charges to cover increased 
royalty fees for supersta- 
tions without first 
reguesting Qty Camcil 
through the regular rate 
procedure. 

(X)erndorf said that he 
hoped that Bimson would 
start immediately to take 
action to keep pe(vlc fro™ 
having to make the addi- 



tional payments received, 
in their April 1 bills . She 
said that peopte were 
receiving additional 
diargesofSl cents, $1.12 
and $2.24. 

No one from Cox Cable 
Tidewater showed up to 
speak befwe CcHincil on 
the item which was placed 
on the unfinished busi- 
ness portion of the 
agenda. 

Mayor Louis R. Joiks 
said that he received a 
message from Cox 
requesting an appearance 
at a later date. 

A Cox subscriber, Roy 
Bartholomew, complained 
about the one dollar 
monthly charge for the 
Cox TV schedule maga- 
zine, which had previous- 
ly been issued f^ee. 

He said that a S2 price 



for the magaane is noted 
in the magazine which 
nnns that the price will 
go up to S2 although 
advertising probably pays 
for more than the cost. 

He complained about 
the 81 -cent rcqralty fee 
mcrease for receivers of 
basic service. "I don't 
ftfaik that buic subscri- 
bers should subsidize 
those who get other pro- 
grams. He said he was 
billed SI. 12 becau.te he 
has two TV sets. 

The increase, according 
to Cox, will pay for the 
oost of increased federal 
copyright fees which are 
used to reimburse the 
producers of syndicated 
programming. This pro- 
gramming is carried on 
five superstations that are 
part of Cox's local system. 



Three of the supersu- 
tions -WTTGandWDCA 
of Washington and WTBS 
of Atlanu - we part of 
Cox's basic service. Two 
others - WOR of New 
York and WON of Chicago 
- are part of a pay 
pg^sk^t introduced last 
October. 

Cox, which serves 
about 100,000 customen 
in Virginia Beach. Norfiolk 
and Portsmouth, tried to 
drop WTTO and WO*! on 
Jan. 1 until Portsmouth 
threatened legal action. 
Cox wants Council to 
make the decision on 
whether to drqp the two 
channels or to increase 
the fee. The Beach Coun- 
cil maintains that Cox is 
required by its firanchise 
to bring all increased fee 
requests before City 



Owncil for approval. The 
company so far has shown 
no inclination to do this. 

The charges, according 
to Federal law, have to be 
made across the board for 
all subscribers, so that 
even the basic subscri- 
bers, who do not receive 
the two additional chan- 
nels, have to pay the 
charges. Only those sta- 
tions which carry mere 
than three superstations 
have the higher royalty 
lees to pav. 

Mayor Jones said that 
although the Cox people 
were not at Monday's 
Council meeting, he ques- 
ticmed whether it were 
wise to wait before decid- 
ing what direction to take. 
"The more we wail, the 
more Cox is going to be 
getting into the billing 



process and the more 
complex it's going to be- 
come." "I'm inclined to 
instruct the city manager 
to get an injunction to 
prevent further billing 
until Cox goes through the 
rate increase procedure. 

Oberndorf made a 
motion to this affect, 
seconded by Council- 
woman Reba McQanan. 

Councihnan Jack Jen- 
nings Jr. said that he 
would like to hear more 
alternatives, like the one 
rolling back the recent 
rate increase (to $8.95 a^ 
month for basic service) 
until the royalty charge is 
removed from the bill. 

Oberndorf said there 
are many alternatives but 
that the problem had to be 
dealt with "this instant." 

See Cox Page 14 



lolution To Indecent Exposure Eludes Police, Prosecutors, Psychologists 



Ccmtinued from Page 1 
section 18.2-370.1 of the 
^c, also a Class six 
fel(Kiy. 

Clayton C. Maguire, a 
psychologist for the city's 
Comprehensive Mental 
H^th Services unit, says 
ifce laws regarding inde- 
cent exposure should be 
4-written to include a 
separate sectioi for those 
merely engaging in 
prdnks. 

"You've got to remem- 
ber, sane of the cases 
which go to court are not 
pisychiatric at all," 
Maguire said. "Incidents 
such as mooning, streak- 
ing and urinaticm in public 
are generally the acts of 
intoxicated cdlege stu- 
dents more than they are 
the acts of someone who 
need professional help. 

"This office is con- 
cerned with the person 



who truly is in need of 
sane psychiatric assist- 
ance," Maguire con- 
tinued. "We deal with 
exhibitionists." 

Maguire explained the 
difference. "For these 
types of people, the 
emphasis is on what for 
them brings about sexual 
arousal. For them, the 
chief way of becwning 
aroused is through the 
displaying of their geni- 
tals, often acccxnpanied 
by masturbation." 

Typically, Maguire. 
said, men between 20 and 
40 years old are the 
perpetrators of the 
offense. The victims, he 
said, are usually young 
girls. In many cases, 
though, older girls and 
young to middle-aged 
women also fall prey to 
indecent exposures. 

Part of Maguire 's job. 



Great Gift For Any Occasion 



Brass Vases 

Made of polished brass, 
stand 4'/2" high. Set of 
jich differenr. Group 

ym^^tud vases 

S^ate a 
'graceful table arrange- 
ment or separately to 
add a touch to individual 
setting. Satisfaction 
Guaranteed, Only 
$11.30. Va. Res. add 4% sales tax. Sorry noC.O.D. Send 
Check ormoney order to JACQUELYN'S GIFTS. P.O. 
Box 2369, Portsmouth, Va. 23702 





along with those of other 
psychcdogists in the Com- 
prehensive Mental Health 
Services unit, is to treat 
people referred to them 
by the city's courts. Last 
year. Maguire said, he 
dealt with "about seven 
or eight" indecent 
exposure cases. 

"Most of these people, 
when they come in here, 
don't envision themselves 
as having an illness that 
needs treatment," said 
Maguire. "My goal, once 
1 start seeing them, is to 
get them to accept that 
they have this difficulty 
and to show them that 
there is hope. I try to 
guide them to more 
acceptable ways of con- 
ducting sexual interac- 
tions." 

Exhibitionists are not a 
threat to the community, 
Maguire said. "They are 
a nuisance." 

Why, then, do indecent 
expcKure cases produce 
both fear among victims 
and headlines in the 
press? 



"Our culture does 
define nudity as taboo," 
he said. "Plus, the victim 
is not consenting to the 
act. She has no say-so; it 
just happens to her. 

"There is an outran 
when this act is done to 
kids," Maguire con- 
tinued. "We-^arc very 
fearful of the long-range 
implicaticHis an episode 
like this might have on a 
young child." 

However, Maguire 
said, "there is really very 
little danger to victims of 
indecent exposure. Most 
of these guys that commit 
the act maintain a dis- 
tance of six feet. They 
don't want to get any 
closer. At the first sign of 
danger, they run. The 
average older victim is 
very minimally afferted 
by exposure, and children 
are not hurt that badly, 
either." 

Law EaforcenMDt 

Headache 

In order for Maguire 

and his cdleagues to 

begin treatment, exhibi- 



Name_ 



Address. 



City/State/Zip 



o&)ieiiuif& 

kNURSERY®, 

4934 High St. West 

Rt. 17, Churchland 

Portsmouth, Va 23703 

434-3426 

Any Growing 10" Hanging 
Basket 1/2 Price with this coupon 

Reg 995—13.95 Limit One Per Customer 
Only Good thru /^ril 13th. 




tioiists must first be 
apprehended. That. 
aax)rding to Sgt. E.L 
Jacbon, a detective in the 
Virginia *^ *■ "'^"ce 
department's juvenile 
bureau, is oitcn difficult. 
"Wh«» this sort <rf 
thing happens, the vic- 
tim's first response is to 
get upset," said Jackson, 
"instead of taking a good 
look at the person so they 
can get a good descrip- 
tion, the victims panic. By 
the time investigators 
arrive, the guy who did it 
is gone, and we have no 
description on him." 

This presents a severe 
problem for the common- 
wealth's attorney's office, 
which is vested with the 
responsibility of prosecut- 
ing these cases. 

"With children, especi- 
ally those under the age of 
seven, it is difficult to 
prove that they know the 
difference between right 
and wrong," said Assis- 
tant Commonwealth's 
Attorney Les lillie, who 
specializes in handling 
juvenile cases. "There are 
those in society who 
believe children fantasize 
about tb ngs and they try 
to prov< it in court. I've 
worked with these kids, 
though, and I know they 
aren't making it all up." 
Corroboration is 
another problem for the 




WeThe Board of Directors of Smith and Williams Hpmes want to assure you its staff is always avaitable to 
personally serve you in your time of bereavement and need. It is our poUcy at Smith and Wilhams to serve 
the fwSlv with dignity, give advice when desired and to comply with aU personal wishes. We invite you to 
i^Jr discuss any questions you may have regarding all aspects of Pre-arrangement pUuming with no 
ob liytion. 




Kempsvillc Ciiapdl 






Kemi^ville Chi^ 

4889 Princess Anm Rd. 

V«.ll»ch.VA 23456 



Smith & Williams 

fUNBAlHOMi 

490-2727 




prosecutor. "A lot of 
times these children have 
no witnesses, and the case 
ends up being the kid's 
word versus that of an 
adult," LUlie said. "In the 
OMirt it is very difficult to 
overcome this te^or. 

"It's a complex legal 
situation," continued 
UUie. "When we are 
dealing with simple 
exposure between adults, 
it is fairly easy to prose- 
cute. When the act 
involves children, how- 
ever, it becomes a com- 
plex animal. When the act 
reaches felonious leveb, 
we treat it mwe seriously. 
All the factors congregate 
together, giving us a por- 
trait of a man we don't 
want in the community. 
Proving it, though, is 
another thing." 

UUie said children he 
has dealt with who have 
been victims of indecent 
exposure were "scared to 
death." Said Lillie: 
"There is a great deal of 
fear and shame that sticks 
with children. It can be 
very traumatic. Often they 
can't sleep because they 
think the man is coming 
back to get them." 

Sometimes, a suspect 
victimizes several houses 
or individuals in a neigh- 
borhood within minutes. 
If enough sketchy inform- 
atitm can be linked to- 



COL. JOSEPH (JOE) EXUM - AUCTIONEER 

**" JOE EXUM AUCTION CO. 

550 FIRST COLONIAL RD. 
VA BEACH, VA 23451 




Phone 422-6684 
422-4949 



AUCTIONS - APPRAISALS 
SALES -PROMOTIONS 



gether, a composite can 
be fed into pcrfice depart- 
ment computers, which in 
turn spit out a list of 
potential suspects. Inves- 
tigators can then narrow 
the list down and some- 
tinM go for an arrest. 

"When we pick them 
up, they usually have a 
standard respohse: 'I 
don't know why I done 
it,'" said Jackson. "The 
repeaters don't even have 
that much to say. They 
sort of hang their heads 
and ask for help." 

In his 17 years on the 
Virginia Beach force, 
Jackson says he has dealt 
with many indecent 
exposure cases. From that 
experience, he concludes: 
"My own point of view is 
that these people definit- 
ely need help, for them, 
going around flashing 
people is the same sort of 
sympton as that express- 
ed by an alcoholic or a 
drug addict, bi all three 
cases, the pec^le need 
professional help to over- 
come their problems." 

Unlike Maguire, Jack- 
son contends that the 
exhibitionist is detri- 
mental to victims. "I 
believe indecent exposure 
can have a terrific effect on 
teenage girls," he said. 
"I've seen what it can do. 
For some girls, fw the 
next two or three days, 
they don't even want to go 
out of their houses. In two 
or three cases I've had, 
the girls couldn't sleep at 
night. A child can be 
scared to death by some- 
thing like this. 

"If it happened to my 



daughter, I'd be real 
upset," Jackson con- 
tinued. "I think.though, 
that I would remain cafm 
enough to not wish any 
harm on the person. 
Instead, I'd concentrate 
on trying to help appre- 
hend the person.^^ 

Jackson said that exhi- 
bitionists, for the most 
part, are harmless. "They 
don't want any trouble," 
he said. "They just want 
to get their kicks." The 
court, Jackson added, 
rowns upon indecent* 
exposure when children 
are the victims. "The 
judges are very stiff in 
handing out sentences 
when minors are involved. 
Judge Moore agreed. 
"We consider it a very 
serious charge," he said. 
"Indecent exposure 

seems to have the poten- 
tial to have a lasting effect 
on small children. Defen- 
dants in these types of 
cases need to know that if 
they're found guilty, the 
court is going to deal with 
them very seriously 
because we want to make . 
sure it doesn't happen 
again. 

"The aci of indecent 
exiKKure is symptomatic 
of deviant bchaviur," 
Moore explained. "Cer- 
tainly we are concerned 
with the victim, but we 
are more concerned that 
this sal of act could lead 
to deviant behavior of 
another sort. We are con- 
cerned that the person 
might get the idea to take 
the act one step further to 
sexual assault. The possi- 
bility is there." 



Correction 

Last week's student creative writing was contributed 
from studenu at Pembroke Meadows Elementary 
School, I^ummond Ball, principal. The works were in- 
correctly JitUibuted to Pembroke Elementary School. 

"The afternoon knows what the morning never 



Exercise & Aei1>bics 

V/lctSora Of Dance As Seen On 
^ 9:30 AM 



suspected." 

HMtMMOMaMMMeoaM 



Swedish proverb 

M8M0M 



RooaAddMitu 

norMaR04MM 

WtchcM 





Who is the right contractor 

for your job? 
I Referral Service For Homeowners 



AIUcCmm 
Porck EmcIomhc* 
Si4li«*l>Miu 
SlonaDoen 



alMMIioMWwn 



Whidowi 
FIrcptacc* 
SwimMtRg Pool 
HomcRe^ri 



ttmmn 



REVEREND SISTER BISHOP 



Spiritual HMl«r^ 
And AdvU 

REVEREND 
SISTER BISHOP 



K—6f 




is a R«(igtous and Holy Woman, who will 
thow you w\\t\ your own ayes how she 
will ramova sorrow, sicknass. pain, and 
all twd lucN What your eyas see your 
heart must believe, and then your heart 
¥vlll t>e convinced that this is the 
religious H(^ Wwnan you have been 
tooking for Reverend Sister Bishop has 
the GoH^en Power to Heal by Prayer Everyone w^elcome at 
the Reverend Sister Bahope' home. Are you sutfenng? Are 
you wck? Do you need help? Do you have bad luck? Bring your 
prabienw today and be rid of them tomorrow The Reverend 
SiSttr Bwiop is here lor the first time She guarantees to help 
whera all others nave failed She guarantees to reunite the 
aaparated. She will remove all evil spells, and guarantees her 
work The Reverend Wier Bishop has devoted a lifetime to 
If^ reMgwus worti. Why go on suttering when just one visit to 
Wm wORMn yM triw M ttckf^ and pain away from you? 
TTie nmmmtd ^Mr BMiop has he^wd thousands a<xl 
giaraMMS to help you 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: 
a04-53i#S94 

In SuffMi, \ni^^irtt 



■^■^.^•^ 



■Hi 



8 Virginia B^ch Sun. April 6, 1983 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 




Finch To Washington 
Associates Staff 



Jim and Bob 
Washington, principals, 
Washinton Associates, 
announced recently that 
Paul G. Finch has been 

added to the staff of this 
Norfolk-based architec- 
tural firm. Finch, who 
received his Bachelor of 
Arphitecture degree in 



1975 from Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute and 
State University, is a 
registered architect in 
Virginia. He previously 
was employed as an ar- 
chitect at Warner, Barnes 
and Associates, Virginia 
Beach. 

Finch is a Cheapeake 
native. 



Volvo Honors Virginia 
Beach Service Manager 



Robert L. Gillman has 
received the Volvo Service 
Managers Award for 
Achievement for high 
professional standards 
and dedicated service to 
Volvo customers. Mr. 
Gillman is service 
manager at Continoital 
Imports, 4980 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia 



Barker C^mbell & FarlQ^ 
Win Awards 



BC&F Appointed- 



The first awards for ex- 
cellence in agricultural ad- 
vertising have been won 
by Barker Campbell & 
Farley for their work for 
Stauffer Chemical Com- 
pany. The awards were a 
first place award for a 
multi-media campaign 
(radio, magazine and 
newspaper) for Vapam 



soil fumigant. 

A full color spread on 
Devrinol herbicide won a 
Merit Award. 

Barker Campbell & 
Farley is a three year old 
agency headquartered in 
Virginia Beach. The agen- 
cy's ag/hort division is 
headedbyJ.R. (Bob)Stif- 
ner. 



B^ker Campbell & 
Farley, a three year old 
Virginia Beach advertising 
agency, has been appoin- 
ted to handle the 
promotion and advertising 
for Chase Arbor, a 
Virginia Beach apartment 
complex being built by 
Crow Terwilliger & 
Michaux of Alexandria, 
VA. Chase Arbor is Vir- 
cotian style apartments 
lavishly landscaped with 



trees and shrubs, located 
near the intersection of 
South Independence Road 
and Holland Road. 
Vaulted ceilings and 
fireplaces are indoor 
features. Barker Campbell 

and Farley has been called 
Virginia's fastest growing 
advertising agency and is 
now billing $6 million an- 
nually. It is Virginia 
Beach's largest agency. 



Beac^^, Va. 

The award was announ- 
ced by John C. Theis, vice 
president for Volvo's Nor- 
th American Car 
Operations. Mr. Theis 
said the Service Managers 
Award for Achievement 
was initiated in 1976 to 
recognize dealer service 
managers who excel in 
providing customers the 
type of quality service they 
expect and deserve and 
whose professionalism, 
pride and involvement set 
an example for others. 
There are three categories: 
Grand Prize, First Prize 
and Honorable Mention. 
Mr. Gillman received First 
Prize. 

Mr. Gillman, who has a 
service staff of nine 
technicians, has been 
associated with Continen- 
tal Imports since 1970. 



Consolidate Your Bills 

24 HOUR APPROVAL 

Home Owner Loans 



•Complete Appication 
overphone 



•Deal Directly 
with Lender 




9-€pmM-F 
9-1 pm Sat. 



LANDBANK EQUITY CORP. 

CaU 1080 LaskiQ &4v\Va. Bcacl^ Va. 2343 1 



SINCE 1886, WE'\ F 
MET TIDEWATER'S 
FINANCIAL NEEDS. 

WE'RE STILl 
GROWING TO MEET 
VOIRS. 



See US for rewarding savings plans and 
^ specialized loans. 

Heine Fedeml 

^ and ban Association 




iif Norfolk Orgmized IMS 

Mam Office 700 Bousli Sueel Norfolk VA ' 627-6431 

ftanch Off iCes Tlwmas Comet BortsirnMh. 

N«n)Ort News Hampton ' Suffo* ' HiWop 

Dcnbcgh Great ftidge GraRon 



YOU'VE STILL GOT A 

CHANCE TO WIN 

ATOUR NEW 

COLUMBUS CENTER BRANCH 

IN THE 
F6^^ FINANCIAL CENTER. 



Fill in the sweepstakes entry fotm 
below, bring it to our new Colum- 
bus Center office by April 8th, and 
you could go home with a 25" 
RCA* Color Console TV with re- 
mote control: an Atari* "800" 
_ Home Computer with bask: soft- 
ware and expanddbte memory to 48K; an F&M 
IRA deposit of $500. or a free regular size safe 
deposit box for a year.' 

Drawing. 2 P.M. Friday. April «h. You must 




be 18 or older to enter. Yru don't have to be pre- 
sent or a customer to v. ir.. Limit one prize per 
family. Sorry, mail-in entne^ ncf eligible. 

GIFTS FOR ACOOUNT DEPOSITS. 

open a new persona! -becking, interest/ 
checking, savings or IRA account with $300 or 
more, or put that amount w\o an exi.-ting savlng5^ 
account, aixl take home a coupon for some really 
great gifts. Plus cwryone gets a free gift just for 
stopping by. First & Merchants National Bank. 




Fill in below and bring to our new 
Columbus Center Office before April 8. 



r 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

■ SWEEPSmKESEMTRYFORM 

I Name . 

I 
I 



Address 

Citv. Stars. Zic 



n 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

J 



Allsafe 
Honored 

AUsafe Services, Nor- 
folk, Virginia, has won 
the safety award of the 
Building Service Contrac- 
tors Association Inter- 
national for its outstan- 
ding safety record during 
the past year. 

James S. Netterstrom, 
CBSE, BSCA Inter- 
national president, an- 
nounce the award today 
during a special ceremony 
at The Orlando Hyatt, 
where the Association is 
holding its 19th Annual 
Convention and Trade 
Show. 

The Company won the 
award in the small firm 
category with the fewest 
number of on-the-job ac- 
cidents. 

Allsafe Services' 115 
fidelity bonded janitorial 
staff clean many of the 
area's smallest and largest 
office and industrial com- 
plexes. 



Service Charges 
Change On Credit 
Cards 



i 



Dan Zipperer, Acting 
Consumer Affairs Direc- 
tor of the Virginia Depar- 
tment of Agriculture and 
Consumer Services advises 
that finance char^ rates 
on open-end sales and 
loan plans will be 
deregulated effective April 
1, 1983. 

The 1982 General 
Assembly removed the 
ceiling of 1 Vi Vt per month 
previously imposed on 
retailers and other lendns 
oigaged in the extension 
of credit through open- 
end credit plans. Lenders 
wishing to increase their 
service charge must mail 
w otherwise deliver a writ- 
ten notice of the increase 
to card holders or con- 



nuiers at least thirty days 
jarior to the effective date 
explaining that any ad- 
ditional charges under the 
Irian on or after the effec- 
tive date of the increase 
constitute acceptance of 
the higher charges and ap- 
fiy to existing balances as 
well. 

Consumers that do not 
pay their credit card 
char^ in full each month 
should be awve that ad- 
ditional charges after 
April 1 will results in in- 
creased service charges on 
their unpaid balances if 
the charge plans they use 
increase their rates. Credit 
card holders should review 
their records to determine 
which accounts will be af- 
fected. 



I I I I I I I I 



I I I 




HOMEOWNERS -REALTORS I 

. SECOND ! 
i MORTGAGE LOANS S 



Single Family 
' Ty.i^nhouses • CondOTuniums 

Honu:- Irnpfovx'ments Purchases 
Bilt Consolidation 
Business Investment 
Amortized ot Balloon Payments 

Loans Up to S?'^'' ''''■ri and more 



(804)461-0909 



II I I 



J i_ 



3^Ha 



PRINTING 

Special Business Paciiage 

*59;95 

1,000 Letterhead 

StatJonary 9Vi x 11 

1,000 Business Envelopes 

Bostacss no. 10 

Black ink on white 20 lb. Bond 
Price includes negatives, plate, 
typesetting and composition 

CALL BRAD AT 486-8700 




RML 



2439 Oconee Ave. 
Virginia Beach 
Virginia •23454 



'1 
) 

q 

i 

r 



Tbrms 
And Lower 
MontMyP 



Mortgage Options 



United Virginia Mortgage CorpOTation is pleased to offer two new second mcKt- 
gage plans designed to fit txiday's budget Th^e inmjvative options combine 
longer terms with today's lower interest rates to offer substantiaUy lower monthly 
payn^its. 

With our new 30A5 Second M(a1gage, monthly payments are based on a 
paybadt period of 30 years although the actual loan tenn is 15 years. This means 
bw monthly p^ents with the remaining bakmoe becommg due at the end of 
tite 15 year peiod. 

Anotha-opti(Mi is our 15 Year SeoxKi Mortgage, with monflily paymaits that 
are cm^deably lower than the traditiOTal 7-10 year second wortg?^it„ 

Add tittse laig term advantages to today's lower interest rates, md you have 
a s&xmd mortg^ both flexiUe and affcvdaUe 

Best of all, there are no broker's fees or jH-qayment pen^ for paying off 
the loan at an raiiier time. 

So call us today to find out more about these exciting new oi^ions. Give us a 
second of your time, and well give you a second mortgage (teagned to fit your 
bud^ 

C^l (Hif office tKm at 









To^Of 


MVM^ 


Amount 


179MOJ«»ly 


Fmil 


180 Monthly 


Pvattrttttgfs 


Fmancsd 


PaynwfKsOf 


^ynwrt 


Payments 


Rdir 


$10,000 


$123.89 


$9,252.39 


$31,428.70 


14.75 


IIS/XX) 


$185.83 


$13,881.72 


$47,145.29 


14.75 


S2S.0OO 


$309.72 


$23,134.12 


$78,574.00 


14.75 


^0,000 


$619,45 


$46,261.^ 


$157,143.53 


14.75 



onvw 
itatllwflntMMnani 
w« ta dua wMii Mrty (S^diy* 
ofltocliMintMi 

MortMMUalnMviea avM- 



aid THa MuNnca iiquirad on 



*IMm aid IWTO aii^acl 
kxMnga wWioiM node* 



tari 



09 



United Virginia 

Mortgcjge Corporation 



461-9426 

# 2 Koger ExecvUve Cento-, Suite 100 
Norfolk, VA 23502 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 6, 1983 9 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



Mortgage Rates Down 



Modest Increase, Slight Drop 



A modest increase in 
family income in February 
and a slight drop in mor- 
tgage rates improved the 
ability of Americans to 
buy a home for the ninth 
consecutive month, ac- 
cording to the National 
Association of Realtors' 
monthly Housing Affor- 
dability Index. 

The February index' was 
W).4— up 0.8 percentage 
point from January's 
revised index of 79.6. 

"The February index 
means that a family ear- 
ning the median U.S. in- 
come of $24,033 had 80,4 
percent of the income 
necessary to qualify for 
the purchase of a median- 
priced existing home, 
which was $68,300 last 
month," Dr. Jack 
Carlson, chief economist 
and executive vice 
president of the 
association, explained. 



The last time the 
Housing Affordability In- 
dex was 100 - meaning the 
median family income was 
exactly what was needed 
to qualify for the median- 
. priced existing home - 
was December 1978. The 
index has been below 100 
ever since. 

"February was the nin- 
th straight month of im- 
provement from the low 
index level of 65.2 last 
May," Carlson said. The 
economist cited falling 
mortgage interest rates as 
the primary reason for the 
steady improvement in af- 
fordability. 

The average interest 
rate on all institutional 
mortgages closed for the 
purchase of previously oc- 
cupied homes in February 
fell to 13.43 percent - 
down from 13.54 percent 
in January and significan- 
tly lower than the 16.11 



Fish H9use Listed In 
Travel Guide 



«■« 



The Lynnhaven Fish 
House has been listed in 
the 1983 edition of the 
MOBIL TRAVEL 
GUIDE, one of the finest 
travel guidebooks 
available. The announ- 
cement was made today by 
Christopher Kyrus, 
Manager. 

To be listed in the 
MOBIL TRAVEL 
GUIDE, the establishment 
must be inspected by an 
impartial, trained inspec- 
tor, who is employed by a 
completely independent 
organization, which has 
instituted a set of standar- 
di^or listings andratings. 
seven 



regional editions provides 
valuable information on 
local history, sightseeing, 
amusements, sports, and 
recreational facilities, in 
addtion to the star-rated 
food and lodging listings. 
Also included are regional 
road atlases and detailed 
maps of major cities, 
special auto-tour routes 
and helpful advice to 
travelers. 

The 1983 MOBIL 
TRAVEL GUIDE books 
are available at Mobil ser- 
vice stations, bookstores, 
magazine outlets, and 
othar^taeatiwhcK^ooks 
»«oldi 



percent rate reported nine 
months earlier. 

Median family income 
has shown steady im- 
provement since early 
1982. According to 
Association caluclations, 
median family income was 
$24,897 - down $138 
from January and $5,345 
less than the qualifying in- 
come reauirement last 

May. 

The percentage of 
median family income 
necessary to make mon- 
thly principal and interest 
payments on a 30-year 
fixed-rate mortgage for 80 
percent of the median- 
priced existing home fell 
in February to 31.1 per- 
cent - the lowest level sin- 
ce October 1980. 

Despite the gap between 
median family income and 
qualifying income for the 
median-priced existing 
home, housing sales have 
increased in recent mon- 
ths, Carlson noted. 

"This is for some ob- 
vious reasons: half the 
families in the country 
make more than the 
median income and many 
homes are priced at less 
than the median," he said. 
"Also, such devices as 
seller financing has 
enabled many homebuyers 
to obtain more affordable 
mortgage interest rates 
than those offered by len- 
ding institutions, which 
are the rates used in 
calculating the Housing 

Affordabilitv Index." 
Based on the experience 

of the last 30 years, long- 
term mortgage rates today 
should be no higher than 
8.5 percent, Carlson said, 
"if that were the case the 
Housing Affordability In- 
dex *rouW b« n9.'2." he 
said. _— _ 




President and Chief Excutive Officer 



In the last three years, Arthur Gunlher, 47, has brought Pizza Hut, \m. 
from a company with sagging pronis, to the nation's leader in pizza sales, lo 
the introduction of a new five-minute pizza. 

GuBther came la Pizza Hut, a unit of PepsiCo's Food Service Division, in 
June 1980 as president and chief operating officer, charged with revitalizing 
the world leader in chain pizza restaurants. 

He's done just that. Since his arrival, average sales per restaurant have gone 
up more than $100,000 and profits have increased 350 percent. 



Pizza Hut Hiring 20,000 To 
Handle New Lunch Pizza 



With 3,839 company- 
owned and franchise 
restaurants. Pizza Hut is 
the world's largest chain 
of pizza restaurants, five 
times larger than its 
nearest competitor. 

Established in 1958 by 
Frank and Dan Carney as 
a small pizzeria in 
Wichits, Kan., the 
brothers' creation grew to 
43 restaurants by 1%3. 
Within five more years, 
there were 300 Pizza Hut 
restaurants. In l%9. Piz- 
za Hut stock went public, 
in 1972 it was listed on the 
New York Stock Ex- 
change, and by 1977 there 
were 3,000 restaurants. 
That year. Pizza Hut was 
acquired by PepsiCo, Inc. 
and now is a part t>f that 
corporation's Food Ser- 
vice OivTI^K^ 



In 1980, Pizza Hut in- 
troduced pan pizza, which 
became an immediate suc- 
cess and now is the com- 
pany's star product, ac- 
counting for 70 percent of 
its pizza sales nationally. 

The new Personal Pan 
Pizza, a six-inch lunch 
pizza guaranteed ready in 
five minutes, is expected 
to position the company 
strongly in the lunchtime 
market. 

Pizza Hut, Inc. owns 
almost half the restaurants 
in the chain; franchisees 
own the remainder. 
Restaurants are located 
throughout the United 
States and in 24 foreign 
countries. \ 

The Pizza Hut system 
employs more than 68,000 
people and is in the 
process of hiring 20,000 



Maintaining a reputation for excellence is an ambitious 
goal for any company. At Concordia Enterprises we strive 
to achieve that goal in everything we do. And this 
year we are particularly proud to announce our 

selection as builder of the 

1982 CUSTOM HOME 
OF THE YEAR 

$160,000 - $200,000 Category 

presented by the 
Sales and Marketing Council 

of the 
Tidewater Builders Association 

We wish to thank everyone who participated in this 
effort, and invite you to allow us to build your next 
home from your plans or ours. 



CONCORDIA 
ENTERPRISES LTD. 

463-2435 




new employees nationwide 
to support the introduc- 
tion of Personal Pan Piz- 
za. 

The company said the 
20,000 new workers will 
be needed because "sales 
are expected to increase 
dramatically when Pizza 
Hut introduced its new 
lunch pizza, Personal Pan 
Pizza, March 28. The 
hirings will be made based 
on the company's projec- 
tions for increased volume 
demonstrated by test 
market response. 

The Pizza Hut system's 
long-range plans call for 
growth. By the end of 
1984, the system will add 
more than 300 restauran- 
ts. Also underway is a 
major refurbishing of the 
1,845 company-owned 
restaurants. 



AFFORDABLE CONDOS 
AT THE BEACH 

♦Monthly Principle & Interest 
VHDA - 5 yr. Buy Down (Limited 
Amount) 

$2650.00 DOWN PAYMENT 

ADD $50 For Taxes & Insurance 

MODELS: OPEN 12-6 428-8198 

NIGHTS: Alice Pyle 340-6441 

PYLE REALTY 460-1777 




466-1777 



Pyle Realty Promotes 
Virginia Beach 



Open House Saturday & Sunday, 2-5 p.m. 

2237/2239 Roanoke Avenue, Virginia Beach 




OcCttTl Park-Outstanding construction quality in ^ 
these two condominium units on Chesapeake Bay. Both 
homes feature extra insulation, sundecks, Andersen Windows, 
three zone heating and cooling, garages, and much more. 
Priced at $195, 000. and $220, 000. By Owner 

424-5722 Days 
460-3461 Nights 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, April 6, 1983 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



Investor Alert 



Oil & Gas Lease Lottery Investment 



This investor Alert ex- 
plains the nature of the 
government-run oil and 
gas leasing systems, points 
out misrepresentations to 
be wary of and lists steps 
potential investors can 
take to protect themselves. 

Across the country, 
ihousands of consumers 
have been contacted by 
telephone or through the 
mails by companies of- 
fering to help them get in- 
stant profits by entering 
oil and gas lease "lot- 
jteries" run by the U.S. 
'Government and the State 
iof Wyoming. NASAA 
'and CBBB warn that 
imany firms charge exor- 
bitant fees, use high 
pressure sales tactics and 
misrepresent the services 
they offer and the nature 
of the leasing systems. 

The United States 
Bureau of Land 
Management six times a 
year posts in its offices a 
list of parcels of federal 
lands available for lease 
by public lottery. Any U.S 
citizen can file for a chan- 
ce to win the option to 
lease the mineral rights on 
a parcel by paying $75.00 
per entry. Lands available 
in this program are not 
within a "known 
geological structure" of a 
producing oil or gas field. 
The vast majority of leases 
have little or no market 
value. 

The;e are many entries 
for each parcel offered. 
For example, in the BLM 
drawing in November 
1982, there were 120,000 
_jeplications foj^SOO par- 
^ ceb.. The jidsf ^rafrtsing' 

Meases ara^ the rnost 
*~ filings; aa many as 10,000 
filings have been made on 
one parcel. The number 
filed on each parcel varies. 
The public is pitched by 
private filing services on 
the, hope of drawing a 
"sleepers" to file on. 
Estimates are that there 
are over 250 companies 
offering filing services 
operating in this country. 

Although each filing 
costs $75.00, filing ser- 
vices charge as mtich as 
$300.00 apiece, e.g. three 
filings for $900.00 or 30 
filings for $9,000. Some 
investors are asked to put 
in as much as $20,000. 
The premium is for the 
supposed expertise of the 
geologist picking the 
leases to file on. 



The NASAA-CBBB 
survey revealed that high 
pressure sales pitches of- 
ten using highly 
questionable statements 
have been made in many 
states. Cease and Desist 
Orders i^ainst filing ser- 
vices have been issued by 
Securities Administrators 
in Arizona, Illinois, In- 
diana, Iowa, Missouri, 
Montana, Nebraska, Nor- 
th Dakota, South Dakota, 
Utah, and West Virginia 
during the last year. 

The NASAA-CBBB 
survey showed that' in- 
vestors in at least the 
following 33 states have 
been approached: Alaska, 
Arizona, Arkansas, 
Colorado, Connecticut, 
Florida, Georgia, Illinois, 
Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, 
Kentucky, Maine, 
Maryland, Massachusetts, 
Michigan, Minnesota, 
Mississippi, Missouri, 
New York, New Jersey, 
North Carolina, Ohio, 
Oklahoma, Rhode Island, 
South Carolina, ien- 
nessee, Texas, Vermont, 
Virginia, West Virginia, 
Wisconsin and Wyoming. 
It is believed that 
solicitations are being 
made nationwide. Reports 
have been received of 
various representations 
and high pressure sales 
tactics including t^e 
following: 

1 . Previous investors have 
won leases worth $40,000, 
$90,000 and even more. 

2. Investors in New Jersey 
are being told they have as 

- high^MA*'^'^* chance^ r 
winnini^alease. _ > 

3. Maine investors have 
been told they are quaran- 
teed against loss and they 
will get $25,000 after five 
years, win or lose. 

4. Montana investors were 
told any lease an investor 
obtains will have a 
minimum value of $20,000 
and if that amount is not 
offered within 180 days, 
money will be refunded in 
full. . 

5. Montana residents are 
told that only six to eight 
persons' names are filed 
on a valuable parcel. The 
State of Montana has 
charged certain oil and gas 
lease lottery companies 
with violating the anti- 
fraud provisions of the 
Montana Securities Act by 
making untrue statements 
of material facts. Reports 



are that offers continued 
even after the states' order 
was served. 

6. Arizona businessmen 
have received unsolicited 

high pressure telephone 
sales calls coming from 
the State of Texas. Other 
Arizonans were subjected 
to repeated calls and as a 
last resort were promised a 
25% discount if the check 
were "mailed today." 

7. South Dakota in- 
vestors have been told that 
every penny of their 
money will be returned in 
full at the end of five years 
if they have not won a 

8. The Federal Trade 
Commission charged one 
company with falsely 
telling a customer he had 
won a lease and should 
submit additional fees 
when the customer had in 
fact won nothing. The 
FTC also charged the 
company with falsely 
telling customers they 
would not be competing 
with other clients for 
leases, when in fact it 
routinely filed more than 
one customer's name on 
parcels. 

Steps to protect yourself 

1. Consult your state or 
provincial securities com- 
missioner to see if any ac- 
tions have been taken 
against the particular 
company or its principals 
before making an invest- 
ment. (For example, the 
principals of one company 
were identified as being 
subject to p85t.,order5 or 

commodity options and 
precious metals futures 
sales.) Ask for and read a 
copy of the order. 

2. Consult the BBB office 
listed in this release to see 
if complaints against the 
company are on file. Bet- 
ter Business Bureaus have 
available informative 
reports on both the U.S. 
and Wyoming lease 
systems. 

3. Don't be overly im- 
pressed by the stated 
credentials of filing ser- 
vices' geologists. Some 
firms' have bwn known to 
falsify the backgrounds 
and extent of work done 
for the company by 
geologists on their staff. 
4. Ask the company for 
statistics, in writing, on 
the total number of 



customers who have in- 
vited with the oil and gas 
lease service compared 
with those who have been 
successful in obtainini a 
lease. 

5. Ask why the company 
feels so sure it can fit^ the 

"sleeper" lease when it Is 
admitted that the large 
majority of the paiceh are 
known to be unproduc- 
tive. Also questions why 
the company represents 
that only a few filings will 
be made on its "sleeper" 
leases. 

6. Do not be overawed by 
high figures of $40,000, 
$90,000 or $300,000 
awardRl to people whose 
names have been drawn. 
The risk is the small 
probability of getting your 
name drawn in the first 
place on a parcel. No 
filing service can increase 
anyone's chances of 
having their name drawn. 
Secondly, even If you mn 
a lease option, a willing 
buyer must be found. 
Many leases are simply 
not marketable at any 
price. Chances are that a 
"winner" will get stuck 
paying the first year iMse 
cost of $1 per acre to the 
government. The odds of 
a high payoff are thus 
minimal. 

7. Ask for written infor- 
mation. Read it and con- 
sult with a knowledgeable 
person about the lottery 
before investing. Do not 
be rushed into investing. 

8. Beware of companieg 
with names that sound like 
government agencies pf 
large weUrkneiwnj xom- 

paiM««. SP»9fri fiWwW- 
vices misrepresent tha: 
they are regulated by BLM 
or the U.S. Government. 
Neither the 'U.S. Gover- 
nment nor the State of 
Wyoming conducts or en- 
dorses any filing services. 

9. Any individual who 
wishes to may enter the 
U.S. or Wyoming gas 
lease systems directly 
without the aid of a filing 
service. Applicants may 
contact a local Bureau of 
Land Management office 
or the Wyoming, Com- 
mission of Public Lands 
for information material. 



The security ad- 
ministrator in your state, 
province or territory is 
responsible for policing 
investments for fraud. If 



THE THN-TIME 
EiUAUZER!! 

INSURED WUfNICIPALS INCOME TRUST 



M-I 



k® 



M-I 



M-I1 



M-I 



M-r 



109 E. Mala Strecl 
Norfolk, Vs., 23514 

(804)625-4281 



uUm h MMtc •• M «w iwinr'i •MM} •• 
a. TMl AAA raltat l> 
IkyMCIC 

MtiMlH Cmtpmitmm mi t^im »* •• 
tti MM ■( tkc Inrt M^ HI w Mk koa* ta 
Ml »WM««*, TN iwiraKt «•» •« 
nil I •• iHrti4 rM An H ««• iM 



= TAX-EXEMPT INCOME 
= AAA RATED UNITS« 
= INSURED INCOME^ 

= CONVENIENT 
$1000 UNITS 

Wheat 



A MUNICIPAL BOND UNIT TRUST. 



....^ UMLaiktaRMi 
Va.lMdi,Vi.,»451 
(804)42S-«110 

imeml iacmw to tlM TniM, tmt 
lo liirillHilden (with carWa cs- 
ceplieai), U cxeapl mmitt 
cxktt^ law f roa F t i eral im t vm t 
lax, bat maj' be tabjcci tu Slate 
aad Local laxcs. Caiillal galM, If 
aay, w* aisled lo las. 



you believe you have en- 
countered an investment 
fraud, contact the 
securities administrator's 
office listed in this Alert. 

The Council of Better 
Business Burraus and Bet- 
l« Business Bureaus in the 
United States and Canada 
answer inquiries on com- 
panies doing businas in 
the areas they serve. 
Before putting money in 
any investment plan, it is a 
good idea to contact your 
Better Business Bureau for 
a reliability report on the 
company you intend to 
deal with. For more in- 
formation, contact the 
BBB listed in this Alert. 

The Investor Alert is a 

quarterly program jointly 
sponsored by the CouiKil 
of Better Business Bureaus 
and the North Americah 
Securities Administrators 
Association to expose in- 
vestment frauds to the 
public and provide useful 
information oil how to 
i avoid these often 
sophisticated and 
unlawful schemes that 
prey on investors. 




by Roger Pyle 



Sensible 
Growth 



I have just returnea 
from an eight day trip to 
California. It rained 
seven of those days and 
it's true California is 
literally sliding into the 
sea. I spent my time in the 
San Francisco and the 
Monterey - Carroel area 
doing Rod Estate work. I 
will not regale you with 
stories about Clint East- 
vraod's Hopbreath 

Restaurant or how I made 
par on 17 at Pebble Beach 
from the sand. But I will 
focus on one single Real 
Estate factor - PRICE. 

I noticed that 
throughout the entire area 
all across the spectrum 
from "low" priced 
housing to prestige 



property, the selling price 
in California ranges from 
30% to 42<7o higher than 
the selling price in the 
Norfolk and Virignia 
Brach area. A townhouse 
that we would sell here for 
$^,000, in the San Jose 
area is $13,7,000. About a 
year ago, we had a lovely 
prestige home on the 
oceanfront for sale for 
$600,000. Local people 
gasped when they heard 
the price. On my trip, I 
saw a comparable home 
in the Monterey area that 
was priced at 1 .2 million. 

We arc very fortunate 
to be living in an area of 
sensible growth where you 
get good value for your 
housing dollar. 



Greenbrier 
Chick-Ffl-A 
Recieves 
Award 



Kenneth S. Oliver, 
Operator of Chick-fil-A 
of Greenbrier Mall, and 
his employees were awar- 
ded the "Hustler's 
Award-Northeast Reg- 
ion" at Chick-fil-A's 13th 
annual seminar held at 
The Greenbrier in White 
Sulphur Springs, West 
Virginia, in February. 

Atxording to Jack B. 
Sentell, Senior Director, 
Field Operations, the 
"hustler's Award" is 
presented annually to a 
Chick-fil-A Unit Operator 
in each region, who, in the 
opinion of the Regional 
Operations Stoff , Accoiin- 
ting Staff, and Field 
Marketing Consultant, 
has exemplified outstan- 
ding overall performance 
during the past year. 

A graduate of East 
Carolina University, 
Oliver has been employed 
with Chick-fil-A for two 
years. He and his wife, 
Donna, have two children. 




PlBOMLJg'S BANK 

y^Ma^^h(i a^you!]ieMerr\eed. 



Since 



GREAT HUDGE: 320 BatdefieU Boulevaid SoutRDEEP CREEK: 1124 George VVbshington Highway NortKEDMONDS C0W4K: 2030 
Bft3ef2dfc^«dNortW3REENBRIER: Btftle^ Boulevard 



Farm Fredt^OLTTH MILITARY HIGHWAY: 2005 South Military Highway, K-Mart Center, in Farm Fredi. 
LYNNHAVEN; 453 South Lynnhaven Road, in Virginia Beach. 



MEMBER FDC 





t 

A Closing 

Word From 

Goodman Segar 

Hogan. 




Goodman Segar Hogan 

We Sell A Home Every 
Two Hours... Every Day. 

Great Bridge Shopping Ctr., 237 S. Battlefield Blvd. 

482-3395 



wmmmmmmmmm 



tm 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 6, 1983 11 



Business, Real Estate ft Finance 



Busch Gardens Opens For Ninth Season 




The U.S. introduction 
of DaVinci's Cradle - a 
new thrill ride never 
before seen in the United 
States ~4iigh]ights Busch 
Gardens, The Old Coun- 
try's liinth season, which 
opens April 2 at 10 a.m. 

Located in the Garden 
of Inventions in the Italy 
section of the theme park, 
the Cradle "rocks" quests 
up and over, forewards and 
backwards, in a spec- 
tacular 36(}-degree multi- 
motion fashion. 

Headlining the Busch 



Gardens lineup of daily 
park shows is the new 
"Hats Off To 

Hollywood." This lavish 
musical salutes the glitter 
and glamour of the 
motion picture industry ~ 
from Chaplin and "The 
Wizard of Oz" to 
"Rocky" and Busby 
Berkeley - through 46 
minutes of song and dance 
in Hastings' Magic Lan- 
tern Theatre. 

Other new attractions 
being added this season 
include an expanded crafts 



program teatunng daily 
demonstrations of pottery 
making, sand casting, 
glassblowing and wood- 
carving; the new Royal 
Palace Theatre (formerly 
the Three Musketeers 
Theatre), which opens on 
April 30 with the Statler 
Brothers in concert and 
continues throughout the 
season with big-name en- 
tertainment; a children's 
ride in Italy called 
L'atliante Piccolo, based 
on DaVinci's vision of 
winged flight (opening 



Potential Appreciation Important 



"E>on't think of a home 
merely as a place for you 
and your family to live; 
think of it also as a shrewd 
financial investment," 
said Bill Anderson of 
Goodman Segar Hogan 
Residential Sales Corp. 

Anderson, noting the 
celebration of Private 
Property Week, added 
that the buyer should be as 
concerned about the 
home's potential for ap- 
preciation in value as for 
"the family's appreciation 
of the home." 



"Most home buyers 
know of the income tax 
advantages that owning a 
home provides, but few 
are aware or concerned 
about how much the home 
is expected to increase in 
value over the years," he 
said. 

Anderson explained 
that, on average, homes in 
Tidewater have increased 
eight percent in value each 
year for the past five. 

"Can you think of any 
investment over the past 
five years that you'd be 



able to u^ and still have it 
increase in value by eight 
percent?, he asked. 
"Home ownership it the 
best hedge on inflation 
you can find." 

Anderson added that 
owning a home should be 
considered as the first step 
in building a portgolio of 
real estate investment 
properties. "Experience 
gained by the buyer in 
home ownership can go a 
long way in helping him as 
a real estate investor." 

He noted that the job of 



mid-April) and a variety 
of stroUing entertainers 
including young 
Shakespeare, a grape 
stomper and a "lost 
Valkeric opera singer. 

According to C. 
Michael Cross, general 
manager, "This season 
promises to be the most 
exciting yet at Busch Gar- 
dens, offering our visitors 
new rides and shows along 
with the wide range of ac- 
tivities that have made this 
park Virginia's number 
one attraction." 



a Realtor "is to help the 
family choose the home 
best suited to its needs and 
lifestyle. The Realtor in- 
cludes the home's likely 
appreciation rate as part 
of that consideration." 

If, after a number of 
years, it becomes 
necessary or desirable for 
the family to "move up" 
to a larger home, value 
added can go a long way 
toward meeting the 
required down payment -- 
and making the monthly 
costs that much easier to 
handle, Anderson noted. 



Serving The Real Estate Needs 
Of Chesapeake 

WAINWRIGHT REALTY 

Are you considering sdling your home? If so, now is the ideal 
time. Call us for a free, no obligation market analysis. We will in- 
form you of the best methods of disposing of your property, 
various types of financing available and other information per- 
tinent to the sale of your property. 

3237 Western Branch Blvd. 

In The Heart Of Churchland 





ODE 



TCWNE 



A Custom Townhouse Community in 

the Urban Tradition. We offer 

exceptional quality at 

affordable prices 





U) Nm imupwia*"!* Uwn >igW on 
SlKWrUal Dt MsMH on »l<< 



Kay Afdahl 
460-2770 



Home 
460-1610 



Model 
490-2356 



REALTY DIMENSIONS INC. 

fit Q (i» 



WfcsflistwtthCENTUFYZr? 



Because we can sell your house. 

• The CENTURY 21 system closes an average of a 
deal every minute of the day, every day of the 
year. 

Number 1 in recognlUon 

• The CENTURY 21 system has 99% awareness 
among homebuyers and sellers. 

Number 1 In preference. . , . , 

• The CENTURY 21 system is preferred 3 to 1 
over all of its national competitors combined. 

Number 1 In advertising. 

• The CENTURY 21 system supporU its sales 
associates with »24 million in advertising - the 
largest ad program in the real estate^industry. 

And more. Much more. 
Consumers believe that the 
CENTURY 21 system: 

• has the most professional and b^tjrained sales 
associates among Us national comp^ors. 

• can do more to help buyers and sdters arrange 
financing than any of its national competitors, 
(In fact, we have more experience in this area 
than any other real «tate sales organization 

anywhere.) 

• can do more than iu national cwnpetitors to 
move you anywhwe throughout the country. 

• can help you find a small real estate investment 
properly ihrouf hoot the USA and Canada. 

METRO REALTY 

420-20(K) 

1341 s. wmm H«;7 

tTimpratr VA 233M 





TOMSCMMN 

AhocMic Broker 
U37.000SalaVolaine 



Anocttlt BrolMr, Silo M|r. 
SMS.QOOuiSilaValuaK 




J 





BENECATPS 

sro.ae8s*iaVotaK 



MOmJ, MUNKIEV. C.1.1. 

AwociMtlwtor 
f2»jaOS«iaVolwM 



Lynbrook 
Landing 



The Builders 
Block 

By Dong Hickman 

Real Etialc Editor 

The Builders Block is a 
regular feature highlight- 
ing new construction in 
Virginia Beach and 
Chesapeake. 





Lynbrook Landing is a 
unique community located 
one mile north of Virginia 
Beach Blvd. off Newtown 
Road. There are five 
hundred lots, three hun- 
dred to be used for 
townhomn, the other two 
hundred for single family 
de^iched homes. There 
will be no PUD (Planned 
Unit Development) fees. 
There will however be a 
park in Lynbrook Lan- 
ding maintained by the 
city. The land for this 
park was generously 
donated by the developer 
of Lynbrook Landing, 
Newtown Developers, 

There are three seperate 
townhome communities in 
the development. The fir- 
st, Lenox, was built by 
Dove Construction Co. 
and was marketed by 
Larasan Realty, Better 
Homes and Gardens. 
Lenox has ninety-three 
units with prices ranging 
from $51,500. to $57,500. 
These units were offered 
for sale on October 31 of 
last year and are now sold 
out. 

The second townhome 
community is Cum- 
berland, built by Omni 
Development Corp. of 
VA. These units also 
have been marketed since 
October 31, and to date 84 
have been sold with prices 
of ^2,450. to $54,250. 
6ne hiindred and twenty- 



We congratulate these top professionals and 
tlw r^t of our l»rd-workinf associate who 
have helped BREAK ALL COMPANY 
SALES RECORDS for a wlKjpping sales 

volume of $1,5M,OO0 in March! ! 

\% K AKK NO. I IN <,Kf A I BHIIM.K 

RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 

351 JOHMSTOWM HOAO CHiSAWAKi, V A. 

S47 45SS 



seven units will be built in 
Cumberland and also 
marketed by Larasan 
Realty, Better Homes and 
Gardens. 

The third, Lindenwobd, 
is being built by Sir 
Galahad Homes Co. Lin- 
denwood is to be built in 
four sections for a total of 
ninety-six townhomes 
with three of the four sec- 
tions being built on cul-de- 
sacs. There are six 
models, two of which have 
alternate floorplans. The 
units vary from one 
bedroom with one bath to 
a s|»ctous three b^lrooms 
and2V2 baths. 

If you would like an in- 
teresting variation in you 
housing, two of the 
models employ the con- 
cept of a loft for the 



second floor, one of which 
may be purchased unfur- 
nished for a further 
savings in cost. 1 was 
quite surprised to find a 
cottage type exterior with 
a contemporary interior 
complete with an optional 
skylight in one of the loft 
units. If Uving without 
steps would improve the 
quality of your life, ranch 
units are also available. 

The following standard 
features arc offered at 
Lindenwood: 

Maintenance free vinyl 
siding with 40 year 
guarantee, air con- 
ditioning, hear pump, 
simulated marble vanity 
tops all baths, 6 panel 
doors, porcelain tubs, 
ceramic tile (tub area), 
wall to wall carpet, no wax 



vinyl, dishwasher, 
disposal, continuous clean 
oven, wood cabinets, 
mininium ceiling in- 
sulation R-26, space saver 
shelving in closets, in- 
sulate hot water heater, 
insulated entry door, 
double stainless steel sink 
in kitchen, storage sheds, 
privacy fence in rear. 

The one bedroom 
begins at a modest 
$52,950 and goes to 
$60,950 for three 
bedrooms. If these prices 
seem like bargains, it's 
because they are. They're 
pre-development prices, 
and will rise as construc- 
tion progesses. The grand 
opening is set for April 9th 
and 10th, and the 
marketing will be by 
Larasan Realty, Better 
Homes and Gardens. 




Housing Affordability 



Second Monthy Index Issued 



The National 

Association of Realtors is 
Msutng its second monthly 
Housing Affordability In- 
(tex today. The index is 
designed to show the 
relationship between 
median family income and 
the income needed to 
qualify for the purchase of 
an existing single-family 
home. 

For example, a Housing 
Affordability Index of 83 
would mean that a family 
«irning the median in- 



come is making 83 percent 
of what is needed to 
qualify for the purchase ot 
a median-priced existing 
home with prevailing mor- 
tgage terms. 

conversely, an Affor- 
dability Index of 154 
would mean that a family 
earning the median in- 
come has more than 
enough income to qualify 
for the purchase of 
median-priced home. An 
Affoedability Index of 100 
would mean that the 



median family income in 
the nation is just enough 
to qualify for the median- 
priced existing home. 

In conjunction with the 
Affordability Index, the 
National Association of 
Realtors provides monthly 
data on the median sales 
price of an existing hime, 
the average mortgage rate 
on loans closed, the 
average monthly payment, 
median family income, the 
percentage of income 



required for mortgage 
payments and the income 
necessary to quahfy.for 
the median-priced home. 

The qualifying income 
is based on the prevailing 
mortgage Ipati 

requirements of the 
Federal Home Loan Mor- 
tgage Corp. and the 
Federal National Mor- 
tgage Association. 

The monthly Affor- 
dability Index release will 
include current s well as 
historical data. 







5110GrMnwichRd. 

Va. Bch„ VA 23462 

499.3330 

A DIVISION OPCOUmUL SEHVICE COMOHATION 



OAflaiik FteRnanent Mortgage Coraiiaiiy 

A WhoBy OwMd Subwdiary of Atlantk Permanent Federal 

Savings k. Loan Astoctation 

944 Independents Blvd. 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455 

(804) 460-1376/2810 



%)iam€U 




A DIVISION Of COLONIAL SEtVICT COBIK>»ATI0N 

Virginia Beach Boulevard W«t 

Norfolk. Virginia 23310 

Phone (804) 623-3753 



Golonixil cJitle 
Jxgency 

A DIVISION or COIONIAL SUWICE COaKWATKW 

944 IndependeiKS Blvd. 
Va. Bch.. VA 23455 

4t»-UH 




The road to success starts when 
you are impired to make the effort. 
We guarantee you will be 
motivated in just one hour with us. 
This success need not be 
specifically in sales. It can be yours 
from a working knowledge of the 
r^ estate market. 

So, why shouldn't you take that 
first step on the Road to Success! 

Call Us Today! 

Surety 

Real Estate School 

5737 Princess Anne KmA 
Virginia Beach. VA 23462 

499-2395 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, April 6, 1983 



The Woman's View 




By JIM KINCAID 



July 27. 1981 

The London newipapers are all upset. 

It seems Nancy Reagan didn't curtsy when she 
met the queen. She just shook hands. 

And, says Nancy, she won't curtsy again when' 
she meets the queen again. She'll just shake hands. 

Oh, that made the British newshounds mad. 

"Nancy won't curtsy to the queen," read one 
headline. 

"I won't bow, says Nancy," read another. 

The Daily Sun was so bent out of shape about 
Mrs. Reagan's refusal to curtsy that it ran a two- 
page story. 

They would have run more but Lady Diana got 
upset with the photographers and cried at a polo 
match where Prince Charles was playing, and they 
had to save some space for that. 

Anyway, the question of whether or not Nancy 
should have laid on a bow or a curtsy when she 
met the queen livened up what might have been an 
otherwise dull day for the British papers. 

It didn't bother the queen at all, apparently. 
She's pretty used to Americans, 1 guess. 

After all, a few years ago Louis Armstrong 
played a command performance at which he an- 
nounced, "This is for you queen baby." 

He got invited back and I bet Nancy will, too. 

This series of excerpts from "Notes To My Frien- 
ds" is brought to you through the courtesy of The 
Donning Company, a local publishing firm, and 
Jim Kincaid. The book is available in most book 
stores. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



* Mayor's Prayer Breakf as! 

The Chesapeake Mayor's Prayer Breakfast will be 
held at Ho Ho Restaurant in Great Bridge at 7 a.m. on 
April 12. 

The speaker will be G. Lamar Sentell, Pastor of 
Calvary Temple Church of Norfolk. 



Art Show Opens At Brent Lox Hail 

"Memories Are To Be Shared" is the theme of the art 
show at Brent Lox Hall, 1017 N. George Washington 
Hwy., in Chesapeake which began on April 1. Visiting 
hours for the show are from 10 am. to 5 pm daily. 
The oils are the works of the late Mrs. Bessie Frances 
Owens of Portsmouth. They were painted when she was 
in her late 80's and early 90's. she was taught by her 
daughter, the late Mrs. Bessie Wasley. This is the first 
public exhibit of these paintings and will be shown thru 
May 30 as part of the celebration of National Nursing 
Home Week in May. 




i^» American 

^v^nPteddler Traditional Stencils 
The Original... 
SOLID BRASS 



DECORATE: 

•walls 

•furniture 

•frames 

•stationary 

•cards 

•ornaments 

•wrapping 

^ paper 






ST-aas 






my 



'4 

% 



BT-ioas 



(804)490-1114 8T«38 

Arrowhead Plaza 

y'irginia Beach, Virgima, 23462 



Edic Adams 

Q,UU^\1\V\» BEAUTY S 



AIJTY SALONS 



We have styling choices 

for everyone and for 

all ages! 

Predaion Professionil 
Hairaits Perms 

»5.70 * 13.95 up 




Open 9-6 Daily 
9 - 9 ThuPBday 



1734E. UMcCra^M. 
SM-W93 



5»Hinto|iPlaia 



•73S.Lf«»lMi'«««wy 

aw IMI 
No AMAiMnMitt 
Omm la Al Vmw c:ofl«cBlnce 



4MI-ESboKl>r. 

4M-3233 
SMIGCahyAvt. 



659? Aatarn Dr. 
41MM9 

SI»V.B«icliMv4. 
497-9769 

Mmt 3 MrioM !■ 
Newport Newi 
mmI HampioR 




The 

Uprooted^ 

Gourmet 

By J. ROBERT PERSON 



The word "Flan" is a word of English and 
French terminology that you can refer to as the 
American term "Pie", which is a pastry shell 
filled with fruit or some other type filling. 

Orange Coupe De Ville 

2 Oranges 4 C. orange sherbcrt 
Whipped topping, as desired 4 mint leaves 

4 marischino cherries. 
Cut oranges into halves, then remove all of fruit 
leaving only the shells. Put them into the freezer 
for several hours until completely frozen. Scoop 
sherbert into shells. Top with whipped topping 
and each with a cherry. Shells with the sherbert 
filling inside them may be made days ahead of 
time and the topping and cherry put on the 
moment you are ready to serve. Serves four 
people. 

Cream Of Leel( Soup 

1 stalk chopped Leeks I chopped carrot 

1 stem of chopped celery .'/j chopped onion 

3 C chicken stock 3 Tab. butter 

2 Tab. flour I Cup Half & Half 
2 Tab. diced Pimientos Salt to taste 

Pepper, Pinch of 

Place washed leeks and other vegetables into a 
pot with stock. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 30 
minutes. Strain all vegetables from stock and put 
into a blinder and puree. Set aside puree. Melt 
butter and mix with flour, cooking over very low 
heat for five minutes. Pour this into simmering 
stock, stirring constantly. Cook Ave minutes, then 
add pureed vegetables. Cook for 25 minutes, then 
turn off heat. All remaining ingredients. This may 
be served hot or cold if you desire. Serves 4 to 5 
people. 

I bid you a good day. i 




The 

Chopping 

Block 

By PAT BEASLEY 



Hope you 'folks' had a nice Easter. I know 
there are some happy students, teachers and 
school bus drivers out there, enjoying their Easter 
break. 

I am going to start my "Break" next week. 

With much regret, I must say Goodbye. This 
will be my last column for this newspaper. 

I have enjoyed very much writing "The Chop- 
ping Block" and serving as 'Woman's View' 
editor, but.... frankly, my dears, I am pooped! 

It may seem early to be talkiing about 'goin 
flshin', but Spring is here, can 'fishin' be far 
behind? 

If you have had. the occasion tc be presented 
with fish that you didn't Uke and wished you knew 
what to do with them, (with the exception of 
"Plank Fish", putting them on a plank, cooking, 
then throwing out the fish, and eating the plank!), 
then here's a recipe that might save you some 
trouble. 

The fish that I can't seem to get excited about is 
Bluefish. This recipe for Bluefish was given me 
years ago by a fellow fisherman. It is good, and 
has saved many a Bluefish from the trash can. 

Hope you try the Bluefish Cakes and enjoy 
them as much as I have - and always, Enjoy! 

BLUEFISH FISH CAKES 

(boil fish until done. Cool, pull meat from the 
bones. Mash the meat) 

1 lb. cooked fish meat 1 teas. Old Bay Seasoning 
V* teas, salt, I T. mayonnaise 

1 T. Worcheshire Sauce, 1 T. baking powder 

1 egg (beaten) 
2 slices of bread with crust removed y^ 
Break bread into small pieces and moisten wfth 
milk. Mix ingredients and shape into cakes. Fry 
quickly until brown. Makes about 3 cakes. 




MAKE BIG, BEAUTIFUL EYES 




Beauty 
Unlimited...^ 



ByPATRlClAOAVIS 



Brow§ sel facial fxprrssion and 
franic eyes. Keep them neat, 
natural and let your eyes create 
the drama. Follow my diagram 
using your own pencil, to find 
wliere brows' should begin, arch 
and end. Tweeze strays from 
between and underneath brows 
in the direction of hair growth. 
Brush brows up into shape, color 
lightly with short, feathery 
strokes and repeat brushing to 
form most natural look. 



*tdJ 



QUESTION: 

My brows are bushy and won't stay brushed in- 
to place, how can I correct that? 

If after tweezing, brows still will not stay in 
place, try sprang hair spray on brow brustv and 
then brush biS»ilt%reIl.* NEVER spray on brtfn^ 
themselves. Also brush brows well at night using a 
good light lubricating night eye oil to condition 
and aid in control of brows. 



Write or call in your 
questions on Skin Care or 
Makeup To: 

Patricia Davis 

Janaf Office Building 

Suite 320 

Norfolk, Virginia, 23502 

Phone: 466- 16«8 



ift 



ADWNCEProRMUU 

Centrunf 



RwaataUn:'- 



OFFICIAL MULTIVITAMIN OF THE 1984 WINTER OLYMPICS 



special 
offer 

*7.39 

with this 
ad 



BONUS OFFER 

30 FREE 

wrmioo 




i=a 



MMUaaORMMUU 



« 



Ceiili'iiiii 



JnmhUtmt" 



INGRAM PHARMACY 

207 25th Street 
VIRGINIA BEACH. VIRGINIA 23451 
(804) 428-6363 



JEANS 

& CASUAL WEAR 

4848 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

V irginia Beach, Virginia 
Aragoaa Shop. Ctr. 

490-3105 



SALE 

i{o)% (M 

six selected mouldings 

PICTURE FRAME 
FACTORY OUTLET 



Ivy Showroom 

1224 Harris Street 

Charlottesville, Va 

296-6128 

MonSat 10 5 



Ivy Showroom 
2921 Va Beach Bivd 

Va. Beach Va 

463-4703 

MonFri 10-6 Sat las 



The Dolling Shop 

Tidewater's Largest Selection Of 
Bears And Dolls 

*•* Introduces 

•^fi RARE BEAR 

^^H Made of 100<^o MINK! 

Signed, Numl^red A nd Limited Editions 

Pedigree Papers 



Come, See Edna Smith 

At 

1355 DeBree Avenue 

Ghent Village Shoppes 

Phone; 627-3319 




The 

Hint 

Man 



B> CHUCK FAULKNER 



Egg Yollis, Leftover - Drop into boiling, salted 

water in a frying pan, and they'll cook evenly. 

This way they're great on a sandwich, or you can 

break them up into a salad. 

Egg Yolks, Preserving - Put them in a container (a 

cup is perfect for two or three) and cover them 

with cold water. Leave them in the refrigerator 

and spoon them out as needed. 

Egg Whiles, Whipping - To get egg whites to whip 

easily, put the egg in cold water for five minutes 

before separating it, then add a pinch of salt to the 

white. 

Or, While beating the egg whites, add a pinch of 

salt to the bowl. 

Electric Light Blubs, Energy Tip - Always keep 
your electric light bulbs clean. Dust them at least 
twice a month. Dust, grime, and insects can - 
reduce the efficiency by as much as fifty percent. 
One 100 watt bulb gives fifty percent more light 
than four 25 watt bulbs, yet uses the same amount 
of electricity. 

Unless for a special purpose, never use colored 
bulbs. They give only half the light. 

Chuck Faulkner is brought to you through the 
courtesy of The Donning Company, a local 
publishing firm, and Chuck faukner. The book is 
available in most book stores. . 



No scrubbing 
Ho soaking 
No steaming 



HAVE YOUR CARPETS 
AND FURNITURE 
CLEANED 
FLOWER-FRESH 
BY PROFESSIONALS 




Dlffadeaif takes the soil OOTl 



Endorsed by furnishings 
manufacturers, 
the Duraclean 
Foam-Absorption 
Process gels 
the dirt out 
that the other 
methods leave in! 




Safest for fabrics and 
fibers. Watch colors 
and textures spring 
back to life. It's all 
done in your home . . . 
ready for guests the 
same day 



^ 



Call iis lor a Free Quotation 
Flower Fresh Carpet and Furniture Cleaning 

Duraclean-Burton Specialists 



487-7941 



Chesapeake 




/5/3 dJItuMi.. 



i^tUi 



"f' 







/)ie£.lAdA/dyscJ * ' ■ 



//ie£,lAd 



Which Do You Prefer? 



NutrUMetics 

' Sk in Cart A Cosmetics ' ' 

Made From 
VITAMINS 




PROTEINS 



Other Cosmetics 

Made From 

Alcohol 

WAXES 

Chemicals 
Formaldahyde 



' 'Complimentary ' ' skin analysis & 

make-up session in your home or 

our Janaf Studio 



Let our experts help you look 
your best ''Naturally" 

Call 4^- 1668 Today 

For Yoor Appointment 



^ 



mmmmm 



%■ 



Virginia Beach Sun. April 6. 1983 13 



Th« Church 
It Th« P«epl* 



Church Hews 



Th«P*epl« 
Ar« Th« Church 



a 



Everyone Is Someone - In The Sight Of God' ' m The Beginning 

•/ The first planning and Hoggard. The 




church has the greatest 
product in the world, but 
the worse sales force." 
"The textile company 
spent a tremendous 
amount of money to 
advertise their cleaning 
product, but the BiUe 
says the blood of Jesus 
Christ cleanses us from all 
unrighteousness" says 
Rev. Hdcomb and Jesus 
Christ is the greatest 
"spot" remover in the 
world." 

The churdi has a varied 
spcHts program which in- 
cludes skating trips, ski 



To win the CSty of 
Wginia Beach is a vision 
of Rev. Jerry Hdcorab, 
Pastor of Kings Grant 
Baptist Church. His 
diurch had the top five 
percent growth among the 
35,000 churches of The 
Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion between 1970-1980. 

Rev. Hdconb says, a 
warm "spirit of love" 
atmosphere and evange- 
lism (outreach others for 
Christ) is a must for any 
church and "christian 
fellowship is a necessity in 
a very impersonal world." 

(fis desire is to instill a 
small town spirit in a 
growuig community by 




knowing their name and 
he wants his ctmgregiUion 
to feel they are not just a 
number. 

By letting^ the people 
know you are there, Rev. 
Holcomb believes you 
reach anybody anywhere 
you can by any means that 
hraiCHTS Christ. He related 
a stCMry of a President of a 
large textile chemical 
company stating "The 



trips, and other recreation 
outings. 

PastOT Hdcomb has an 
active visitation program 
in which he try to visit 
each new family. As part 
of his open door policy 
Rev. Holcomb says, "The 
pastcw needs to be real. 
We do not want gaps 
between me and the 
people. I am not a reli- 
gious performer but 



sameooe you can see and 
tiOk ta" Rev. Holcomb 
continues, "I think what 
really matters is nai 
whether this is a large or 
small, wealthy, or poor, 
evangelistic or n<m- 
evangelistic church, but 
the underiying reality, is 
it a loving diurch? A 
loving church is goii^ to 
grow, an unloving church 
is not. This is the very 
basis of the gospel "God 
is love." Jesus said "By 
tlwse s^ns shall all men 
know that you're my 
deciples, thtx you love one 
another." Interest speaks 
invcdvement says Rev. 
Hdcomb as a need arises 
we want to meet it and 
find out; How can the 
church serve the need? 
Ihe church must have 
form and organization so 
new areas can be exfdor- 
ed. If the vision for Kfatgs 
Grant Baptist is to con- 
tinue, the pastor must see 
thills for the people and 
tell them what he sees." 
Pastor Holcomb looks 
ahead three to five years 
and hopcfiiUy the congre- 
gation grasps hold of the 
vision. 

A graduate <rf South- 
eastern Baptist Theol(«i- 
cal Seminary in Wake 
Fo-est, S.C, Rev. Jerry 
Holcomb received a BA 
from the University of 
Georgia in 1963. Rev. 



Hdcomb was called to 
serve the Kings Qrmt 
community on Februuy 



29. 1968 and continues as 
their oastor today. 



it 



7 am not a religious performer but 
someone you can see and talk to,^\ 

Rev, Jerry Holcomb 




The first planning 
meeting held by the dea- 
cons of the Thalia Lynn 

Baptist Oiurch to organ- 
ize a church in the Kings' 
Ckant area was on August 
4, 1%S, and the first 
Sunday service was con- 
ducted by Rev. Bob 
Wallace in the Kingston 
Elementary Schod. 

A call was extended to 
the Rev. Jerry Hdcomb in 
February of 1968 and he 
held his first service in 
June of that year. 
' In July of 1968 a new 
building contract was 
authorized and drawn 
with Chewning, Goodwin 



and Hoggard. The first ; 
morning wOTship service : 
was held in the present 
location October 5, l%9i ; 
Since then. King's; 
Grant Baptist Church has ^ 

gone through four new j 
building programs includt i 
ing a new educaticmal ; 
building, an enlarged; 
sanctuary, additional: 
mobile class rooms and ; 
even more educational j 
building enlargement. j 
Present plans by Rev.; 
Holcomb include the; 
possible building of a new; 
education building to; 
double Sunday School; 
capacity. i 



CHURCH BULLETINS ' 

Forum On Refugees, April 8 

The forum, spon<iored by the Virginia Beach Church i 
Women United, will be held Apr. 8 at 10:30 am. to; 
12:30 p.m. at Westminister-Canterbury, 3100 Shore; 
Dr., Va. Beach. Mary Pat Liggio will present a progranfcjr^ 
on the resettlement of refugees. Lunch will follow thcl 
meeting at a cost of '3.50 per person. 

Call reservations to 340-2383 or 467-4986 no later 
than April 6. 

I 

"A World Missions Conference" ! 

The conference will be held April 10-13 at King's Grant ■ 
B^itist Church each evening at 7 p.m., Sunday through; 
Tuesday. The Wednesday session begins at 6:45 p.m. : 

The speakers will be Cloyd Harjo, Missionary,: 
American Indians; Mohamed Jerry Ahamad. former; 
missionary, Guyana; Agnes Morgan, missionary, Philip-; 
pines; James A. Foster, missionary, Surinam, S.A., and- 
Janice Mack, Supt. of Children's Home of Virginia Bap- 
tist, Inc. A nursery will be provided. 



Reverend Jerry Holcomb 



Building A House Does Not make A Home 




This is 601 Meadow Lane — someone's dreamhouse on the 
way to fulfillment. Yet the poet reminds us that no house 
becomes a home the minute a family moves in. 

It takes a heap of liyin' 

And something more it takes. Our living needs the firm 
undergirding of faith of God. Our days require aim and 
purpose which religious conviction alone can inspire. 

Down the hill is a vital center of this community. At the 
neighborhood church scores gather each week for worship, 
for spiritual renewal. 



Just you watch. One morning 
several months hence you'll see the 
family from 601 Meadow Lane 
head down the hill to worship. And 
you'll know someone's dreamhouse 
is on the way to becoming their 
dreamhome. 



Kings Grant Baptist Church 

873 Little Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



SUNDAY 
MoralBt WenUp . . . IHM ■.■!. 

SMBday SdMol 9:0e a.iii. 

Sn*W School 10:00 a.m. 

Monrin Wonbip . . 1 1:00 ■.■■. 
E*(irii«WonU|i ...7:00p.m. 



WEDNESDAY 

Family Nlgbl Dinner. 6:00 p. 
GnMkd ChlMrcni 

CMn 6:30 p. 

Prayer Servkt 6:45 p.i 



Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
340-0902 



will&baumer 

Candles 



Sunday 

Mark 

16:1-11 



Monday 

Luke 
24:13-35 



Tuesday 

Luke 
24:50-53 



Wednesday 

ICohnthians 

15:1-11 



Aatkoriied DMkr 

See us for your 
sp«dal Easter Needs 



Longs Religious 
Supply 

'Your CMstim Supply Htadquvtm' 

nit MoiMicilo Avt., Noriaft. Va. 

627-4H«9 




im n^mATHm to nxwATER's 

OTML-FMMILY CHURCH 

INDIAN RIVER 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

' iSOO LaunI AV9IIV 
Ch9»ap9ak; Va„ 23325 

Phaie W. McSwain, Jr. Pastor 

424-5700 



H 



The 

Open Door (m)540-i44i 

Chapel 

31T7 Va. ieach Blvd., Va. Beaci, Va., 23452 

SUNDAY TUESDAY 

S«.i.,Sd»ol W5AM BttkSMr IM«AM 

^^^ ..,.10-JiAM WEDNESDAY 
PniaaS«i»icc *JtWI MI*^wASw»fc«....750»»l 



CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

4923 Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard CampbcU, Pastor 

495-1004 
Youth L.I.F.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. 



Michael F. Fasanaro, Jr. 

Attorney At Law 
#5 Koger Executive Center 

Suite 220 
Norfolk, Virginia, 23502 

461-6121 




GL4DTIIN^ 



•jaA-M. 
ia^A.M 

M»A.M. 



SUNDAY 

kfMia 
CMraHMOrWwiM* 



WEDNESDAY 

TJtP.M. FHril,MiMA(Mnn ; 

DAILY 

>i wA ic*-i .r v.. art. ■ N«f .' 



A. L. Kay, Paaor Danny R. Thomas,>4Mocw»* Pastor 



^ MOviowcE M»i> - wacwi* »EA«. vmow* >^ 

Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 



1-City 
Hydraulic Corp. 

2952S<Hith Military Hwy. 

P.O. Box 6276 

ChesapMke- Va.. 23323 

487.U36 

Mr. Dan Short 



ACI & MEC 

119 BatUeneld Blvd., S. 
Chesapeake, Va., 23320 

482-4545 

Charles t. Ilamby 
Nellie Hamhy 



e^dar f^oad MemU^ of ^ 




tMCfOMlin^ 
ATMMMC 



UwrierCkwr' ) W.Ota.M. 

r>antMlitt< iM^var 74t p.m. 

Toa*o V«H« Mote. . 7 JO p.m. 
rMa%N%^1J9p.m. 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, April 6, 1983 



Traffic Analyst, 
New Father, Playing 
It Day-By-Day 

By Gred Goldfarb 

Stin Editor 

Paul Joseph Lanteigne, 29, said he was "in the 

right place at the right time," when the Virginia 

Beach Police Department last year received 

federal money to allow the creatioj of a traffic 

' analyst position. 

An eight-year member of the VBPD, he began 
his police work in Virginia Beach at the Third 
Precinct, moved to the K-9 unit and later worked 
for about four years as a uniform officer on the 
resOTt strip. Last j^ril he became the city's first 
full-time traffic analyst. 

What is a traf^c analyst? 

"It's somebody who assists in the analyzing of 
accident data to see if there are any ccvrelation or 
patterns so we can maximize enfcffcenjent efforts 
in those areas," Lanteigne said. 

Lanteigne is a master pdice officer. He also has 
a bachelor's degree in criminology and is working 
on his master's degree in public administration. 

He lives in Back Bay with his wife Tracey. They 
have two children: Ashley, 2; and Adam, born CMi 
Saturday, March 26, 1 983 . 

Recently Lanteigne was selected the Uniform 
Division Support Officer of the Year, an award of 
which he's proud but humbled to receive. 

"Knowing the calibre of people in this division, 
; it was a great honot," he said, "There's a lot of 

other guys who deserve it as much as I do." 
: Lanteigne attributes his success as traffic 
analyst to the fact that formally there hadn't been 
such a positi(»i before he assumed the duties. 

"It was not structured," he said, "so I could set 
up my own programs of what I thought would 
work. Luckily, some of them have worked." 

Lanteigne, a Bostcxi native, is a 1971 graduate 
of Princess Anne High Schod and has been a 
Virgina Beach resident for about 20 years. 

He said he has wwked closely with a special 
management program, which secured funding for 
14 additional traffic radar sets for the city. 

Busy with a new baby, Lanteigne said his 
immediate future is well in place fw him. 

"1 play it day by day," he said. "I'm trying to 
have a happy family right now. That's utmost." 

Lanteigne worked three traffic fatalities last 
year, and says occupatioial pressure is there 
whether you want it or not. 

"I can't answer how you handle it," he said. "I 
never think about it until after it's over. It doesn't 
get any easier, but nothing surprises you 
anymore. Yai wonder why peq?le do things. Then 
you stc^ looking for explanations." 

Lanteigne's duties and retipmsibilities as a 
traffic analyst fallinto five areas. The areas and 
his duties, many of which he has already 
completed ot is completing, include: 
Enforcement 

•Constantly evaluate C.A.R.S. reports, iden- 
tify trends, and make recranmendaticHis. 

•Conduct long and short term forecasting 
reference manpower, equipment, budget needs, 
etc. to continue existing traffic related prc^rams 
and implement new oies. 

•Develop, update and evaluate selective 
enforcement prc^rams. Assist with speed man- 
agement prc^ram (maintain records, chart 
graphs, identify trends, make recOTimendatiOTS 
^ and evaluations). 

•Assist with D.U.L enfcwcement enfcffcement 
program (same as above but more extensive). 

•Iteview all fatal traffic accident investigative 
reports and extract statistical data. 
Education 

•Develc^ new prc^rams, maintain and update 
existing programs in the area of traffic safety. 

•Explain new programs to police personnel, 
judges, and other interested parties. 

•Instruct recruit class and in-service training in 
the area of traffic safety, traffic records, D.U.L 
enforcement, and practical traffic stqps. 

•Work with the city schod beard in enhancing 
student driver training prc^ram. 

•W<xk with the DcfMrtment <rf Transportation 
Safety, V.A.S.A.P., A.A.A. and other interested 
groups in all aspects of traffic safety. 

•Respond to coufriainants and inquiries. 




Paul Lanteigne 

Supply statistics to interested agencies, groups, 
or individuals . 

•Conduct requested traffic safety lectures. 

•Work with local news media (T.V., radio, and 
newspaper) to keep public informed of traffic 
related matters. 

Engineering 

•Work with city traffic engineering, brth in 
their programs and self initiated programs. 

•Work with officers concerning field problems 
in their specific zones. 

•Evaluate statistics to ascertain their correla- 
tion to possible engineering defects. 
Projects 

•Develope and prepare city-wide manuals for 
the analysis of alcohol elated accidents and D.U.L 
arrests. 

•Develqse and implement a ctmiputerized 
traffic analysis system for selective enfwcement 
locations, high accident intersections and D.U.L 
enforcement. 

•Design and generate computerized version of 
the accident analysis tally, sheet. 

•Conduct aerial and land-based observations of 
high accident intersections. 

•Perform time series analysis of alcohol related 
accidents and D.U.L arrests. 

•Conduct a study regarding the number of 
accidents occuring at various overpasses and 
bridges. ^ 

, •Establish a liaison between the police depart- 
ment and traffic engineering. 

•CcMiduct informational displays at the local 
malls concerning D.U.I, and child safety 
restraints. 

•Work with Virginia Beach General Hospital 
providing information, posters, and phamplets 
concerning child safety restraints. 

*^Work with C.B.N. University to produce three 
public service announcements for television. 

•Conduct a multi-media information campaign 
concerning drunk driving and other traffic safety 
subjects, utilizing city public information, elec- 
tronic sign advertising, newspapers, radio, and 
television. 

•Work with superiors in testing and certifying 
.breathalyzers against effects pf R.F.I. 

•Elected vice chairman of the Virginia Highway 
Safety Records and Analysis Representatives. 

•Working on a D.U.L enforcement evaluation. 

•Working <mi a study of the use of unconven- 
tional cars for speed management. 

•i^pointed to serve as enforcement represen- 
tative to the city's Task Force on D.U.L 
Unrelated duties and responsibilities 

Member of the Qvil Disturbance Unit. 

Member of the S.W.A.T. Team. 

Emergency Medical Technician. 

Breathalyzer operator. 

Self defense instructcx'. 

Side-handle baton instructor. 

Academy and in-service instructor fcx various 
patrol procedures. 



Voice Of The People 

Should The City Provide Lifeguards North Of 40th Street? 



Student Creative Corner 

These works were contributed by fifth graders from W.T. Cooke Elementary School, Margaret M. 
Nicolls, principal. 



A Storm At Sea 

The winds blow and the wav» rise 
Crashing against the shore. 
You can hear the elves bowling 
And the gods 
Throwing lightning bolts 
Down from the sky. 
Then the clouds clear away 
And the sea is calm again . 

By Scoll AraoM, 12, Sm of Mr. Md Mra. Dmvid Roberta. 



A Storm At Sea 

There was the furious storm 
Stamping on the beach like 

a horse 
Thunder as loud as the storm 
Waves Crashing everywhere 
Echoes from here to there. 
By Steve CiMriKiiican, 10, Son of Suzuim McKinaey 



A Storm At Sea 

The crystal light shown 

at sea 
All of a sudden the light 

went away 
The waves sounded like something 

was being beaten 
There were pink shells all 

over the sea 
They were sparkling foam 

all over the place 
Then suddenly it seemed 
_ like... 
"^^Well, a fariy coming wiT 

of the sea 
The waves stopped and 

everything was calm. 

By Pally Kaifhl, 10, daughter of Mr. and Mr*. Dovit Knighl. 

A Storm At Sea 

As the waves gallop across 

the foamy plains, 
the wind is moaning 

And dying 
And coming back to life again. 
The sun is gone 

and nothing is left but the bony 
Hands of the clouds. 

■-^ 
The waves fall unmercifully 

On tlite scattered sands of the shoxc 
And then all is quiet. ..again. 
By Jesrica NewlU, 10, daHgliter of Mr. ami Mn. R<«er Newly. 



Fire 

Captain 

Austin 

Takes Job 

'^Seriously" 




AnstiB 



The March Firefighter of the Month is Medley E. 
Austin. A six year veteran of the Department, Austin is 
a firefighter at Company 12, the Seatack station. 

Captain W.H. Adams has described Austin as 
"sincere, intelligent, and dedicated." He added that 
Austin "Ukes his job very seriously." Austiil admits 
that what he lites best abait his job is the "dynamics of 
the shift work because the routine of the shift can be 
broken at any time because of a fire or rescue call." 
"Being at your best at a moment's noti<x is what h is all 
abtxit," concliuled Austin. 

One area where firefighter Austin is at his best is 
when participating in the Department's School 




Rate Hike 



A Storm At Sea 

Here I am on my lonely balcony 
staring startled at the furious 
foaming surf. 
I am sure that it is quite damp 
out there in the open world. 

It is a frantic world out there 
you know-with the slashing 

lightning and pounding misty 

waves. 
It is dark out there. 
By Amy Gill, 11, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. El«er an 

A Storm At Sea 

As my boat glides slowly out to sea, 
I can see the horizon, ugly and black. 

Suddenly , my view is blocked . 
A giant wave sweeps over my head. 

Hours later, I can see the sunrise, 
pretty and pink 

Quickly I erase that thought, 

Pink in the morning is not a good sign. 

Then, suddenly, the sea became furious. 

It becan crashing about, throwing my 
little boat the wrong way . . . 

...It crashed. 
...It rained. 
...It poured. 

"My little boat was lost.. . 
...and so was I. 

By Beryl Kiseblein, 11, daughter of Judith Davidaoa 



A Storm At Sea 

Quiet, calm, and free 

are the waves. 
Crystal light blue water 

crashes against my boat. 
Then, 
A storm 

waves, waves so vicious 

waves so high 
Foam, foam pounding ^^ ^^ 

Then an ts calot &g^n. 

By Amber Garrte, 11, daughter of Mn. Mary Gwria 



Education programs. WOTking with the fire education 
specialists, he has participated in presenting presdigd 
and school assembly programs dealing with fire safety. 
When the WTKR documentary "Epidemic Fire" was 
filed, it was firefighter Austin who agreed to present 
the preschod section. 

Austin became interested in w<wking with children 
while working at the Plaza Statiai. Since the Education 
office is adjacent to this station, many children's grouis 
tour the statirai. Austin participated in these tours and 
ft^om there developed his interest in conveying the fire 
safety message to children. 

According to Austin, the biggest challenge involved 
in working with the children "is to be able to break the 
ice with them. Due to the turnout gear they wear, the 
firefighter can present a frightening figure . It is a 
challenge to create a method that will dispose of these 
fears." Austin found that by relating the firefighter 
dad in turnout gear to Star Wars ' character Darth 
Vader, the children lose their fear and listen to fire 
safety messages being presented. Evidently Austin b 
successfiil. Fire Education Specialist Catherine 
Meredith stated that "Austin does an excellent job in 
preschool programs ; he has a beautiftil positive 
attitude." 

For Austin, spare time means referceing soccer 
matches. Ifc serves as a referee for the NCAA 
refereeing soccer matches held at ODU, UNC, William 
and Mary, Dute, and other cdleges. Additionally, on 
the local scene, he referees high schod soc(»r matches. 

Firefighter Austin, a native of Massachusettes, 
served as a vdunteer Firefighter in Nyack, New York, 
before caning to the Beach as a career man in 1977. He 
and his wife reside in the Pocahontas Village section of 
the aty. 



"Sure they ihould. 
Jusi becMue mi mm of 
the 6«dcA if north of 
4^h Str^t iotm V mmm 
mtythtitf, it't ttU « pmi 
of y^lnki Bmch. Vu 
imblk nam thtu mmjt^ 
m mtuh Of It uMt mem 
to tht south." 

DooaaWhMey 

\5-ytmi 



"I think they should 
hate iifeguardi 
everywhere becauie 
don U drown jial 
kudee Inlet ontf 
4$lk Itnet. If mmebody 
evm dnrmm pmt -MrA 
.MmUt Afr# k go^ to 
hedUt iMMm fm city 
€mUMU If Ut€p don't 



MN 



"K«f, the city needs 
more lifeguards because 
only so many people can 
uae the beach south of 
40th Street. The rest 
have to go somewhere 
and it ought to be safe. 
The city 's economy 
depends on tourism, and 
ttmrUts want to go where 
ihty can feel safe. ' ' 

Aletia Hall 

model 

%ix-year resident 



"Yeah, I think they 
need lifeguards all over 
the beach because there 
are a lot more people at 
the beaches than the Uft- 
guards can keep an tye 
on now. What happmts 
when more people come 
to the beach this year? if 
there is not enough 
money, the city shouU 
lake up a collection. " 

Keith Schidil 

stud^t 

10-year residoit 



Continued from {age 7 

Mayor Jones said the 
Council faced the immedi- 
ate prd}lem of billing. 

HeischcA>er then made 
his substitute motion, 
seccmded by Jennings. 

Bimson asked to dis- 
cuss the motion in execu- 
tive session. McQanan 
(Ejected to having an 
executive sessiai in the 
middle of the meeting 
while pec^le were in the 
Council chambers. 

Heischdier said the he 
wanted to enjoin Cox 
Cable from adding billing 
for the superstations as 
false and to tsAx the 
position that the past bill- 



ing was invalid as con- 
trary to the current fi'an- 
chisc agreement. 

Once an injunaioi is 
secured, (%emodrf said, 
the pet^le won't have to 
pay until a decisioi is 
made. 

R. Jones wondered 
whether it were wise to 
seek an injunction or to 
accomplish the same 
thing by resolution, 
directing Cox to refUnd 
and to make no further 
billing fot the royalty fee. 

The mayor then decided 
to finish the remaining 
items on the agenda 
before recessing into 
executive session. 



"hi dd age cne learns much (rfwhtt one didn't wmt 
to understand in youth." 

Karl Julius Weber 



Park Women Meet 

The G.F.W.C. Ocean Park Woman's Qub will 
hold it's April meeting on Wednesday, April 13, 
at 11 a.m., luncheon at 12 noon, in the dubroom 
at the Ocean l^k fire station. 

Mrs. Jdm Tharp, Chairman (rf the commktee 
on Family Living and Aging wiU give a slide 
presentation on "Aging a Slate of Mtad." 

Ms. Margaret LaBo-e, Qub's representative to 
Qirl's Sute will give a talk about CHrl State. 

Mrs. C.L Simpson and Mrs. R.B. Engte and 
theic group will be the hostesses for tin luncheon. 



PAHS Sets Oklahoma 

The ftincess Asmc High Schod Drama Depart- 
ment and Band will present fcr its spring musical 
- a favorite classic by Refers and Hammerstein - 
"Odahoma". 

This musical event will be held three eveningi 
A|^ 14, IS and 16 at 8 p.m. in the Prin<xss Anne 
Kgh Schod aiulitorium. 

Hclwts arc $3 for advana sales, and $3.50 the 
evening of the play. Fot ra«c infoimatian call 
499-1261. 



mmmmmm 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 6, 1983 15 



Festival Of States 



Virsinia Beach Public Notices 



Green Run H.S. Band 
Heading To Florida 



The Green Run High School Nfarching Stallions, under 
the direction of Mr. Ronald Collins, have been selected 
as the state representative to the 62nd Annual Festival 
of Sutes to be held in St. Petersburg. Florida the second 
week in Apnl. 

This prestigious marching band competition will host 
bands from IS states from across the country, coming 
from as far away as Oregon. Approximately 3,000 
students will participate in this week-long event. Con- 
cert and field competitions will be on the agenda, plus a 



parade and a "concert-in-the-park" to be given to the 
citizens of St. Petersburg. 

The cost of the trip, $45,000, has been met through 
fund-raising efforts by the band parents organization 
and the students themselves. 

Each year, only one school is asked to be the 
representative from its home state, and Green Run is the 
only band to have the honor of receiving an invitation 
two years in a row. Last year, they were awarded a 
second place in the concert competition and a fifth place 
overall. 








CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



20 words or less - $4.40. Additional words ■ 22« each. 
Please print clearly using one word per box. 



1 Kempsville 
Finalists 

























' 


























4.40 


4.62 


4.84 


5.06 


5.28 


SX 


5.72 


5.94 


6.16 


658 


6.60 



Please run ad for. 



Mall to: 

Byerly Publications 
P.O. BOX 1327 
Chesapeake, va. 23320 



issues, or until cancelled ( ). 
Cost of single ad $ 



Number times to run 
Amount enclosed $ _ 



NUieNMrim 



PMcHMriN J i NUknmkt 



nwlcNMriiif 



Name 

Address 
CItY 



Stete. 



ZIP- 



Your telephone number _ 

WJ. OA^WO WJS RUN W T* CHESAPEAICE POST AND THE vmCINIA BE ACH SUN 

^r help irttl! v<Hirda$^fled ^Pl^a»Bcaii 54^5^^ 



Keith Patrick Lowe and 
Christine Hope Williams, 
both seniors at Kemps- 
ville High Schod, are 
among the 500 finalists for 
a Jostens Foundation 
Schdarship. 

M«e than 14,000 high 
schod students through- 
out the United States 
applied for the award. The 
200 scholarship winners 
will be annouiK:ed this 
spring. Selection of the 
finalists and winners is 
based on outstanding 
achievements in schod 
and community affairs, 
meaningful work experi- 
ences and academic eiKt\- 
knM. 

The Otizens Scholar- 
ship Foundation of 
America, Manchester, 
N.H. as administrators for 
The Jostens Foundatioo 
Schdarship Program, has 
selected the finalisu and 
will select the winners by 
late A^. Finalbu wto 
do not reaive sclwtar- 
ships will i«(»ive Certifi- 
oites. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, April 20, 19$3, at 
7:30 p.m., in the Council Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The staff briefing will be at 6:45 p.m., in the Com- 
missioner of the Revenue's Conference Room, Room 
125. The following applications will appear on the 
agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. F. H. and F. K. Rcamy requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 76, Section 2, 
Lynnhaven Colony, 3121 Lynnhaven Drive. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

2. Nick and Judy Cirillo requnts a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 108, Section 
1-B, Red Mill, 2188 Agecroft Road. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

3. Donald R. Smith requests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a building ad- 
jacent to a public street on Lot 373, Section III, Pem- 
broke Meadows, 800 St. James Drive. Bayside 
Borough. ^ 

4. John W. Thornton requests a variance of 9 feet to a 1 
foot side yard setback (east side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (accessory building) on Lot 7, Block A, Great 
Neck Manor, 2212 Harbor Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

5. David Beyer requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot 
rear' yard setback instead of 10 feet as required (swim- 
ming pool) on Lot 11, Block C-C, Section 10, Lake 
Placid, 2440 Enchanted Forest Lane. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

6. Runnington Investment Corporation by Pandell 
Builders, Inc. requests a variance of 5 feet to a 65 foot 
building separation instead of 70 feet as required when 
principal structures arc separated by a common ingress, 
egress and of 5 feet to a 15 foot side yard separation 
between buildings not separated by a common ingress, 
egress instead of 20 feet as required and of 12 feet to an 
8 foot setback from the south property line and of 15 
feet to a 5 foot setback from Laskin Road instead of 20 
feet each as required and of 5 feet to a 5 foot setback 
from the east property line instead of 10 feet as required 
(townhouse condominium project) on Lots A & D and 
property of W. B. Gallup, Birdneck Acres, 1221 and 
1233 Laskin Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

7. Hayden I. DuBay requests a variance of 2 feet in fen- 
ce height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required side yard adjacent to a street (Fen- 
tress Avenue) on Lots I and 33, Block 2, Chesapeake 
Beach, 4531 Pleasure House Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

8. William C. Burke, HI requests a variance to park a 
commercial vehicle in excess of one (1) ton in a residen- 
tial or apartment district, where prohibited on Lot 27, 
Block B, Section 25A, Magic Hollow, 2904 Cardo 
Court. Princess Anne Borough. 

9. Mary W. (Gomez) Adams requests a variance of 40 
feet to a 10 foot setback from Discovery Crescent in- 
stead of 50 feet as required (through lot) and of 12 feet 
to a 3 foot side yard setback (south side) instead of 15 
feet as required (pool, deck, steps and pump house) on 
Lots 8 and 9, Princess Anne Hills, 313 Whitehaven 
Road. Virginia Beach Borough. 

10. Sam Arrington requests a variance of 10 feet to a 10 
foot front yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
(residential addition) on Lots 20, 21, and Western half 
of Lot 19, North Virginia! Beach, 208 76th Street. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

11. Ronald Johns by Schertle Pools, Inc. requests a 
variance of 1 foot to a 4 foot side» yard setback (west 
side) instead of 5 feet as required (swimming pool) on 
Lot 2, Block 23, Diamond Springs Homes, 5629 West- 
bury Road. Bayside Borough. 

12. A Fuentes requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot 
side and rear yard setbacks (northeast corner) instead of 
10 feet each as required (swimming pool) on Lot 30, 
Section 4, Larkspur, 4724 Southern Pine Drive. Kem- 
psville Borough. 

13. Christopher G. and Teresa M. Doty request a 
variance of 2 feet in fence height to a 6 foot fence in- 
stead of a 4 foot fence as allowed in a required side yard 
adjacent to a street (Topaz Circle), Lot 51, Block H, 
Section 3, Salem Villages, 3981 Topaz Lane. Kempsville 
Borough. 

14. David L. Snyder requests a variance of 1 free- 
standing sign to 2 free-standing signs instMd of 1 free- 
standing sign as allowed on Parcel X. Lynnhaven In- 
dustrial Park, 2697 Dean Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 

15. Horst P. Elsbergen requesU a variance of 26 feet to 
a 4 foot setback from Holland Road instead of 30 feet 
as required (through lot - swimming pool) on Lot 13, 
Block D. Section 1, Windsor Oaks West, 3817 Forrester 
Way. KemjHville Borough. 

16. Stanley D. Grimm rwjuests a variance of 5 feet to a 
15 foot rear yard setback instead of M feet as required 
(glassed in porch) on Lot 4, Block L, Section 2, 
ParUament Village, 5378 Leicester Court. KerapsviUe 
Borough. 

17. Rkhard D. Hertzig requesU a variance of 14 feet 2 
iiKhes to a 3 foot 10 inch side yard aljacent to a street 
(H<rfly Road) instead of 18 feet as required and of .5 feet 
to a 7.5 foot side yard setback (cast side) instead of 8 
feet as requir«I (rraidential addition) on Lot 14, Block 
1 1 , Ubermeer, 222 55th Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

18. ftiM» B. Mills requrats a variant of 15 feet to a 20 
foot setback from Rodriguez Drive instead of 35 feet as 
reqwlred on Lou 23, 24 and 25, Block 5, East Norfolk, 
Bonney Road and Rodriguez Drive. Kempsville 

BOTOugh. 

19. W, F. Olivw, Jr. and Bartara P. Oliver requau a 
variarce of 9 feet to an II foot front yard srtback 
(Ckxan View Avenue) instead of 20 feet as r«iuir«l and 
of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setl^;k (east side) instead 
of 8 f«t as required of Lot 7 and 8. Block 17, 
Ch«apeake Park, 4828 Bay Bridge Lane. Bayside 

Borough. 

M. Richard J. Geczi r«iuests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 

foot ride yard setlwrk («Bt side) instead of 10 feet as 

raiuiied (swimming pod) on Lot 5, Forrest Park, 1000 

Timbttwood Court. Lynnhaven Borough. 

21 . Dr. Sidiwy Coren requesU a variaiK* of 3 f «t to a 

15 fo« ride yard adJKant to a strwt (58th Str^) in- 

ste«l of 18 fe« as required and of 3.1 feet to a 4.9 foot 



ride yard setback (north side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (2 story residential addition) on Lot 7, Block 4, 
New Virginia Beach, 5800 Ocean Front Avenue. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. John W. Kellam requests a variance of 19,500 square 
feet of land area to 10,500 square feet of land area in- 
stead of 30,000 square feet of land area as required and 
125 feet of lot width to 75 feet in width instead of 200 
feet of lot width as required for a multiple family 
development on Lots 16 and eastern half of Lot 18, 
Block 38, Virginia Beach Development Corporation, 
516 20th Street. Virignia Beach Borough. 
ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 
Garland L. Isdell 
Secretary 
193-13 2T4/13VB ' 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Brach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the 
City Hall Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, April 25, 
1983, at 7:00 p.m. at which lime the following ap- 
plications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of Robert W. Wad- 
dell, M.D. Trustee of Virginia Beach Orthopedic 
Assoc., Inc. Employee Profit Sharing Plan for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to O- 
1 Office District on certain property located on the 
South side of Old Donation Parkway beginning at a 
point 1049.26 feet West of First Colonial Road, running 
a distance of 813.73 feet along the South ride of Old 
Donation Parkway, running a distance of 744.19 feet in 
a Southeasterly direction and running a distance of 
481 .91 feet in a Northeasterly direction. Said parcel con- 
tains 4 acres more or less. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of BOSDIM and 
Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to R- 
8 Residential District on certain property located on the 
North side of South Lynnhaven Road beginning at a 
point 1 16 feet East of Pritchard Road, running a distan- 
ce of 438.65 feet along the North ride of South Lyn- 
nhaven Road, running a distance of 744.08 feet along 
the Eastern property line, running a distance of 450.58 
feet along the Northern property line and running a 
distance of 720.62 feet along the Western property line. 
Said parcel contains 7.2 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 
3. An Ordinance upon Application of Virginia Beach 
Racquet Club North Associates for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for renovation and expanrion of existing 
recreational facilities to include locker rooms and grill 
on certain property located on the East side of Thomas 
Bishop Lane beginning at a point 560 feet more or less 
North of Great Neck Road, running a distance of 760 
feet more or less along the East side of Thomas Bishop 
Lane, running a distance of 130 feet in a southeasterly 
direction, running a distance of 300 feet in an Easterly 
direction, running a distance of 330 feet more or less in 
a Southerly direction, running a distance of 860 feet 
more or less in an Easterly direction, running a distance 
of 260 feet more or less in a Southwesterly direction and 
running a distance of 1030 feet more or less in a 
Westerly direction. Said parcel contains 9.379 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 



Jayc— C»l »b ra fi o B 

The Occanfront Jaycees will host, in honor of 
Virginia Beach's 20th Birthday, a dance on Satur- 
day, April 30, at the Virginia Beach Dome on 
Pacific Avenue. The name of the dance is the 
"Celebration Etence" which will end a day long 
program of activities known as "City Hall Day" 
to be held at the Virginia Beach Municipal Center. 

Music for the celebration will be by the 
Tidewater Dixieland Allstars as well as the beach 
sound by a local DJ for an entire evening of con- 
tinuous music for dancing and listening. Proceeds 
from the tickets will be given to the Virginia Beach 
Maritime Historical Museum with ticket prices at 
$4 prior and $5 at the door. Refr«hments will be 
available with proceeds going to local charities. 

The dance will begin at 8:30 p.m. and last until 
1 a.m. Tickets are available from members of the 
Oceanfront Jaycws, the Virginia Beach Dome, 
Virginia Beach Maritime Historical Museum. 



A conference deaUng with the Artificial Heart 
and iu techndogkal. ethical, and legal implic- 
ations, wUl be held on Saturday, April 23, in 
Virginia Beach. 

The Old Dominion Univeraity Institute of Ap- 
iriied Ethics, in coopo-ation with Uie Human 
Values Prc^am of the EastoD Virginia Medical 
School, will sponsor "The Artificial Haurt: An In- 
terdisdplinary Expkwation." One of the nation's 
wp three rooin^ physldans in ardfidal implant- 
ation, I^. Thomas Starzell of the University of 
Pittsbuih Medical School, wiU highlight Uie con- 
feroice uid wiU discuss the ^;thod of fuiwtion, 
tlw history of iu devdopment, and a techndt^ical 
asiosment of tiie Artifidal Heart. Otho" sym- 
ponums wUl include topics in EUiks, Law, 
Thedo^. and Psychiatry by profesrionab in 
those respective fields. 

1^ ccmferoce inU be hdd at the Holiday Inn 
On Tlw Ooean, 39th and Oceanfront in Virginia 
Beach. For more inform^on and registration 
I^OMdures, ^Bue nil tte Old Dominion Univer- 
rity Aru and L«ters Public Service Program at 
440403. 



16 Virginia Be|ch Sun, April 6, 1983 



Virsinia Beach Public Notices 



PttkNcHMrbig 


hikliclltarinf 



NbiicllMriiif 



NkleNMriiig 



hAHcNMriiif 



PukNc NMring 




4. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Roy G. Farless and Richard W. Set- 
zer. Property located on the North side of Scott Bend 
Lane, 200 feet West of Garcia Drive. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

5. Appeal from E)ecisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Delia Lee Barton. Property located 
on the South side of Old Virginia Beach Rad, 75 feet 
East of Realty Avenue. Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

6. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Mrs. J. James Davis. Property 
located at the Northwest corner of Pinewood Road and 
Holladay Point. Plats with more dctaileiii information 
are available in the Department of Planning. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

Department of Planning. 

All interested persons are invitred to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

City Clerk 

193-12 2T 4/13 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Council Chambers of the City 
Hail Building, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, April 18, 
1983, at 2:00 p.m. at which time the following ap- 
plications will be heard: 



ZONING 



DISTRICT 



CHANGE OF 

CLASSIFICATION: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: , 

1. An Ordinancje upon Application of R. G. Moore for 
a CHAME of ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to R- 
6 Residential District on certain property located on the 
West side of Salem Road beginning at a point 1640 feet 
North of Elbow Road, running a distance of 379.97 feet 
along the Westside of Salem Road, running a distance 
of 3688 feet along the Northern property line, running a 
distance of 1112.80 feet along the Western property 
line, running a distance of 2347.58 feet along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 554.75 
feet in a Northerly direction and running a distance of 
703.29 feet in an Easterly direction. Said parcel contains 
66.2 acr?f,,^g:pMf|VILLE BOROUGH 

2. AilOrdifi«IW?!?,A«Ppn Appljcjition t)f R. G. Moore for 
a CHAJyJOE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to O- 
1 Office District on certain property located on the 
South side of Bonney Road beginning at a point 600 feet 
more or less East of Witchduck Road, running a distan- 
ce of 195.3 feet along the South side of Bonney Road, 
running a distance of 459,5 feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a distance of 186.9 feet along the 
Southern property line and running a distance of 514.9 
feet along the Western property line. Said parcel con- 
tains 2.1 1 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of S & B Properties, 
Inc., for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 Residential District to B2 
Community-Business District on certain property 
located on the West side of Centerville Turnpike begin- 
ning at a point 503.72 feet South of KempsviUe Road, 
running a distance of 207 feet along the West side of 
Centerville Turnpike, running a distance of 118.08 feet 
along the Southern property line, running a distance of 
229.64 feet in a Northwesterly direction, running a 
distance of 199.01 feet in a Northeasterly direction and 
running a distance of 114.47 feet in a Southeasterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 1.06 acres. KEM 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Holland Proper- 
ties Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from I-l Light Industrial District 
to A-3 Apartment District on certain property located 
200 feet North of Holland Road beginning at a point 
906.40 feet West of Edwin Drive, running a distance of 
300 feet along the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 648.90 feet along the Western property line, 
running a distance of 292 feet along the Northern proper- 
ty line and running a distance of 676.20 feet along the 
Eastern property line. Said parcel contains 4.5 acres 
more or less. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of Peterson 
Associates, Inc., a Virginia Corporation, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business 
District to A-1 Apartment District on certain property 
located on the West side of KempsviUe Road beginning 
at a point 690 feet South of Indian River Road, running 
a distance of 122.50 feet along the West side of Kem- 
psviUe Road, running a distance of 270 feet more or less 
in a Northwestrerly direction, running a distance of 95 
feet in a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 
500 feet more or less in a Northwesterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 350 feet more or less in a Nor- 
theasterly direction, running a distance of 300 feet more 
or less in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance 
of 200 feet in a Southwesterly direction and running a 
distance of 350 feet more or less in a Southeasterly 
direction. Said parcel contains 4.5 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Application of Peterson 
Associates, Inc., a Virginia Corporation, for a change 
of zoning district classification from R-8 Residential 
District to A-1 Apartment District on certain property 
located 300 feet more or less West of KempsviUe Road 
beginning at a point 900 feet more or less South of In- 
dian River Road, ru^ining a distance of MO feet more or 
less In a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 
500 feet more or less in a Northwesterly direction, run- 
ning a distance of 800 feet more or less in a North- 
easterly direction and running a distance of 500 feet 
more or less in a South«sterly direction. Said parcel 
contains 9,908 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 



7. An Ordinance upon Application of Waco Equipment 
Company for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
bulk storage yard on certain property located at the 
Northwest corner of Rouse Drive and Mac Street, run- 
ning a distance of 207.62 feet along the North side of 
Rouse Drive, running a distance of 218.4 feet in a Nor- 
thwesterly direction, running a distance of 100 feet in a 
Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 88.35 
feet in a Northwesteriy direction, running a distance of 
330.61 feet along the Northern property line and run- 
ning a distance of 290.16 feet along the West side of 
Mac Street. Said parcel contains 1.64 acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

8. Appeal from decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Ronald S. Bray. Pro|>erty located 
6418.31 feet more or less East of the intersection of First 
Court Road and GreenweU Road in the Subdivision of 
Bayville Farms. Plats with more detailed -information 
are available in the Department of Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

9. An Ordinance upon Application, of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Department of General Services for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a sanitarium (Non- 
Medical Environmental Alcohol Detoxification Center) 
on certain property located 150 feet South of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard beginning at a point 290 feet East of 
Groveland Road, running a distance of 200 feet along 
the Northern property line, running a distance of 175 
feet along the Eastern property line, running a distance 
of 145 feet along the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 1 15 feet in a Northerly distance of 64.50 feet 
in a Northerly direction. Said parcel is located at 3177, 
Virginia Beach Boulevard and contains 29,596.50 
square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

Department of Planning. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

City Clerk 

191-12 2T 4-6 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Planning CommissicMi wiU hold a 
Public Hearing on Tuesday, April 12, 1983, at 12:00 
Noon in the Cbuncil Oiambers of the Qty Hall 
Building, Princess Anne Courthouse, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. A briefing session wiU be held at 9:30 A.M. in 
the Planning Department Cbnference Room Oppratirais 
Building. PLANNING COMMISSION ACTION IS NOT 
A FINAL DETERMINATION OF THE APPUCATION, 
BUT ONW A I^ECQMWyBWDATION TO THE CITY- 
COUNCIL AS TFffi VIEWPQINT C»^ THE PLANNiN©') 
COMMISSION. FINAL DETERMINATION OF TWE '■ 
APPUCATION IS TO BE MADE BY CITY COUNCIL 
AT A LATER DATE, AFTER PUBUC NOTICE IN A ' 
NEWSPAPER HAVOvRj GENERAL CIRCULATION 
WITHIN THE CITY. The fdlowing applications will ' 
appear on the agenda: 

REFERRED BACK TO PLANNING COMMISSION BY . 
CITY COUNCIL ON FEBRUARY 14, 1983: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of Gateway FreewUl 
Baptist Church for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
a group home (weekend use for military perscmnel) cm 
certain property located on the South side of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard beginning at a point 520 feet m^e or 
less West of Toy Avenue, running a distance of 60 feet 
along the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
running a distance of 413.10 feet in a Southwesteriy 
direction, running a distance of 196.80 feet in a 
Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 213.13 
feet in a Northerly directicm, running a distance of 
217.28 feet in a Northwesteriy direction, running a 
distance of 1310.63 feet along the Western prt^erty 
line, running a distance of 864.82 feet alcHig the 
Southern prqjerty line, running a distance of 1226.38 
feet along the Eastern prc^rty Une, running a distance 
of 160 feet in a Northwesterly directicm, running a 
distance of 225.41 feet in a Southwesterly directicMi, 
running a distance of 146 feet in a Northwesterly 
directicMi, running a distance of 200.41 feet in a 
Northerly directicm, running a distance of % feet in a 
Northwesterly direction and running a distance of 
212.69 feet in a Northerly direction. Said parcel 
contains 25 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
DEFERRED BY PLANNING COMMISSION FOR 60 
DAYS ON FEBRUARY 8, 1983: 

2. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivisim Ordi- 
nance, Subdivision for Stuart Held. Prc^rty located en 
the Northwest cwner of Atlantic Avenue and 18th 
Street. Hats with mere detailed infcK-maticm are 
available in the Department of Planning. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
SUBDIVISION VARL\NCE: 

3. Appeal frc»n Decisicms of Adnunistrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordi- 
nance, Subdivisitm fw Wilder Enterprises, ftc^rty 
located on the ScHith side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
East of Groveland Road at 3177 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. Plats with mcve detailed infOTmation are 
available in the Department of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordi- 
nance, Subdivision fw Iva I. Bowman. Property located 
at the Eastern extremity of Glen Arden Road. Plats with 
more detailed information asz available in tte 
Department of Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROJGH. 

5. Appeal fr<mi Decisions of Administrative (Xficers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivisiwi Ordi- 
nance, Subdivision for Richard E. Kinner, Jr. Prc^rty 
located or the West side of Princess Mne Road, 580 
feet mo-e at less Smith of West Neck Road. Plats with 
more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Hanning. PUNOO BOROUGH. 

6. Appeal from Decisicms of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Onli- 
nance. Subdivision for Floyd Swartz, William H. Barba 
and James L Milligan. Property located oi the 
ScHitheast side of Lakeview I>ive, 1050 feet more or 
tess Southwest of Bromfleld Avenue. Plats with nuare 



detailed information are available in the Department of 
Planning. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

7. Appeal frcmi decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Odi- . 
nance. Subdivision for Ronald S. Bray. Prcqjerty located 
6418.31 feet mott ox less East of the intersection of 
First Court Road and GreenweU Road in the 
Subdivision of Bayville Farms. Hats with mwe detailed 
information are available in the Department of 
Planning. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

8. An Ordinance up(m Applicaticm of Newtown 
Developers, A Virginia General Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-6 Residential EXstrict to R-8 Residential CMstrict 
on certain property located 209 feet North of Connie 
Lane beginning af a point 520 feet more or less East of 
Lawrence Drive, running a distance of 313 feet alcmg 
the ScHithern property line, running a distance of 409.18 
feet along the Eastern property line, running a distance 
of 315 feet along the Nrathern property line and 
running a distance of 397.5 feet alcmg the Western 
property line. Said parcel certains 1.6 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upcm Application of Joseph J. Basgier 
for a aiANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from R-5 Residential District to A-2 Apartment 
ttjtrict on certain property located on the West side of 
Pleasure House Road beginning at a point 400 feet 
North of Lake Bradford Lane, running a distance of 100 
feet along the West side of Pleasure House Road, 
running a distance of 305 feet alcmg the Northern 
prc^erty line, running a distance of 120 feet more c»- 
less along the Western property line and running a 
distance of 350 feet alcmg the Southern prc^rty line. 
Said parcel is located at 2333 Pleasure Housje Road and 
contains 30,492 square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upcm Application of Pickett Road 
Associates, A Virginia General Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
frcmi R-6 Residential District to R-8 Residential District 
<m certain property located on the East side of 
Lawrence Drive beginning at the Eastern extremity of 
Daniel Smith Road, running a distance of 20 feet along 
the East side of Lawrence Drive, running a distance of 
509.56 feet along the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 310.12 feet along the Eastern property line, 
running a distance of 281.30 feet along the Northern 
prc^rty line, running a distance of 294.20 feet along 
the Western property Une and running a distance of 
228.28 feet in a Westeriy direction. Said parcel contains 
2 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

11. An Ordinance upon Application of Chesapeake 
Investment Company, A Virginia General Partnership, 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from A-1 Apartment District to A-2 Apartment 
District on certain prc^rty located on the West side of 
^College ParkAM^Mtord beginning at a point 300 feet 
more or les« North of Chestnut Hill Road, running a 
distance Of 1 145 feet along the West side of Ccrflege 
Park Boulevard, running a distance of 268.73 feet along 
the Northern property Une, running a distance of 998.88 
feet along the Western property line and running a 
distance of 432 feet alcmg the Southern property line. 
Said parcel contains 8.2 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
ROUGH. 

12. An Ch-dinance upcm Application of Herbert A. and 
Carolyn A. Culpepper for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from AG-2 Agricultural 
District to B-2 Ccmimunity Business District cm certain 
property located on the West side of Princess Anpe 
Road beginning at a point 490 feet South of Seaboard 
Road, running a distance of 155.25 feet along the West 
side of Princess Anne Road, running a distance of 352 
feet alcmg the Southern prc^rty Une, running a 
distance of 150.70 feet alcmg the Western prc^rty Une 
and running a distance of 388.26 feet along the 
NcMthern prcqjerty Une. Said parcel contains 1.17 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upcm AppUcaticm of Ccmstance C. 
Dalrymple for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CIASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to 0-1 
Office District on certain property located on the Scmth 
side of Bcmney Road beginning at a pcant 227.92 feet 
East of South Fir Avenue, running a distance of 50 feet 
along the Scmth side of Bonney Road, running a 
distance of 596.5 feet alcmg the Eastern prc^rty line, 
running a distance of 150.7 feet along the Southern 
prc^rty line, running distance of 413 feet alcmg the 
Western prc^rty Une, running a distance of 84.8 feet 
in an Easterly direction and running a distance of 180 
feet in a Northerly directicm. Said parcel is located at 
4303 Bonney Road and contains 1.7 acres. LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

14. An Ordinance upon Applicaticm of Jack V. Osmcmd 
(First Colonial Medical and Professional Building) for a 
CHANGE OF ZC8"«NG DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
frcm^ R-4; Residential District to 0-1 Office District on 
certain prc^rty located on the NcM-th side of Wolfs nare 
Road beginning at a point 433.76 feet West of First 
Colonial Road, running a distance of 147.73 feet along 
the Ncxth side of Wc^fsnare Road, running a distance of 
214.19 feet aloQg the Western property line, running a 
distance of 79.39 feet along the Northern property line 
and running a distance of 1%.10 feet along the Eastern 
prc^crtyline. S^ parcel is located at 1760 Wc^fsnare 
Road an<| contams 14,375 square feet. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUCH. 

15. An Ordinance upon AppUcaticm of Ruth N. Garriscm 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSI- 
FICATK*! from A-1 y^artment District to A-2 
Apartment District on Lots 16 thru 28, Block 9. 
Woodland. Parcel is located at 801 24th Street and 
contains 1.32 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upon Application of U.S. Habitats for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATICW 
from R-5 Residential District to 0-1 Wfice District on 
prc^rty located at the Northeast comer of Nc«h &eat 
Nteck Road uid Wolfsnare Road, running a distaiKe of 
104.89 feet along the NcHth side of Wc^fsnare Road, 
running a distance of 21 1 .24 feet alcmg the Eastern 
property line, running a distance of 212 feet along the 
Ncvthem property lii«, running a distance of 222. TO feet 
akng the East side of Ncrth Oeat Neck Road and 
running around a curve a distance of 39.27 feet. Said 
I«rcel contains 39,944.5 square feet. LYNNHAVEN 
K>ROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Iferbert A 



Culpepper, Carolyn A Culpepper and F.O. Vcwttsfa^ 
a cSSgE of zoning DISTRICT ClASSIFICATICW 
from R-8 Residential Kstrict to B-2 Community 
Business District on certain property located at the 
Southeast corner of Virginia Beach Boulevard and 
Oceana Boulevard, running a distance of 213.10 feet 
along the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
running a distance of 135 feet; along the Eastern 
prc^erty line, running a distance of 213.10 feet along 
the Southern prc^rty line and running a distance of 
135 feet along the East side of Oceana Boulevard. Said 
parcel contains 28,033 square feet. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 
OONDmONAL USE PERMTT: 

18. fSD Ordinance upcm Application of the Gty of 
Virginia Beach, Department of General Services for a 
CONDmONAL USE PERMTT for a sanitarium (Non- 
Medical Environmental AlccAd Detoxification Onter) 
on certain prc^erty located 150 feet South of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard beginning at a point 290 feet East of 
Groveland Road, running a distance of 200 feet along 
the Ncslhern property line, running a distance of 175 
feet alcmg the Eastern property line, running a distance 
of 145 feet alcmg the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 1 15 feet in a Northerly direction, running a 
distance of 55 feet in a Westerly direction and running a 
distance of 64.50 feetjn_a Northerly direction. Said 
parcel is located at 3lf7 Virginia Beach Boulevard and 
contains 29,596.50 square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOR- 
OUGH. 

19. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Herbert A and 
Carc^yn A. Culpepper and F. O. Powers for a 
CONDmONAL USE PERMTT for a self service gas 
staticm on certain prc^rty located at the Southeast 
corner of Virginia Beach Boulevard and Oceana 
Boulevard, running a distance of 213.10 feet along the 
South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, running a 
distance of 135 feet alcmg the Eastern property Une, 
running a distance of 213.10 feet along the Southern 
property line and running a distance of 135 feet along 
the East side of Oceana Boulevard. Said parcel contains 
28,033 square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

20. An Ordinance upon Applicatiop of Q^eative 
Displays, Inc. for a CONDmONAL USE PERMFf for 
three 12' x 25' biUboards on certain property located at 
the Southeast ccwner of Vu^ginia BeacA Boulevard and 
North Birdneck Itoad, running a distance of 576.44 feet 
alcmg the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
running a distance of 133.56 feet in a Southerly 
directicm running a distance of 2S0 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 600 feet 
in a Southwesterly direction, running a distance of 400 
feet in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 200 
feet in a Northwesterly direction and running a distance 
of 600 feet more cm- less alcmg the East side of North 
Birdneck Road. Said parcel contains 10.35 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. : 

21 . An Qi^iMu^'^j^^pa^^n of M^. And Mrs. 
Jimmy R^y Payne for a (^QNeWonAL USfi I^RMTT 
fcx- a beauty shc^ on certain property located on the 
Northwest side of Old Great Neck Road beginning at 
point 153.50 feet Northeast of Kenstock Drive, running 
a distance of 272.11 feet along the NcMthwest side of 
Old Great Neck Road, running a distance of 141.51 feet 
alcmg the West side of Nc«h Great Neck Road, 

running a distance of 294.34 feet in a Southwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 137.50 feet in a 
Southerly direction and running a distance of 109.97 
feet in a Southeasterly direction. Said parcel conCains 
1.206. LYNNHAVEN BORCHJGH. 

22. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Stephen Payne 
Cole, Mary Payne Jett Cde and David Fauber for a 
CONDmONAL USE PERMTT for a duplex on the South 
side of Pinewood Drive, :»4.73 feet East of Mediter- 
ranean Avenue on Lots 9 and 10, Block 5, Pinewood. 
Said parcel ccmtains 5,150 square feet. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

23. An Ordinance upon ^pUcaticm erf J, 0, & R 
Enterprises for a CONDmONAL USE PERMTT for a 
tempcM-ary parking lot on certain prc^rty located at the 
Northeast ccM-ner of Atlantic Avenue and 30th Street on 
Lots 1 thm 6, Block 73, Vurginia Beach Development 
Corp. Said parcel contains 1.03 acres. VIRGINL\ 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

24. An Odinance upon AppUcation of John W, Vakos 
for a CONDmONAL USE PERMIT for a bicycle rental 
in ccmjunction with the Oceanfront tan on property 
located at the Northeast comer of Atlantic Avenue and 
30th Street cm Lots 1 thru 6, Block 73, Virginia Beach 
Develcq)ment Ccrp. Said parcel contains 1.03 acres. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

25. An Ordinance upon Application of John C. 
Aspinwall for a OONIXTKM^AL USE PERMTF for 
mini-warehcwses on cotain prcH^erty located Tffi feet 
South of Shore Drive beginning at a point 850 feet more 
cx^ less West of tadepeiulence Boulevard, running a 
distance of 120 feet alcmg the Northern property Une, 
running a distance of 225 feet along the Westent 
prc^erty line, running a distance of 120 feet along the 
Southern prc^rty Une and running distance of 225 
alcmg the Eastern property line. Said panxi contains 
27,000 square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

26. An (Odinance upon AppUcation of Creative 
Displays, tac, few a OONEffTK»iALUSE PERMTT for 
two 12' x 25' billboards on certain prt^rty located on 
the East side of CentervUle Turnpike beginning at a 
point 2850 feet more or less North of Kani»vilk RcMul, 
running a distance of 1000 feet more or less akng the 
East side of Centerville Turnpike, running a cUstuice ci 
1500 feet in a Scmtheasterly direction, running a 
distance of 5dO feet in a Southwesterly direction and 
running a distance of 800 feet more or less in a 
Northwesterly direction. Said parcel contains 13.7 acres 
more or less. KEMPSVILLE BOROUCH. 
AMENEMENT: 

27. Motion of the Planning OommissiGn <^ the Qty of 
Virginia Beach. Virginia, to araewi and rrordain Article 
4, Section 401 (a) of the Campnhcmiyt 2k»ing 
Ordinance pertaining to use rcgi^tions in the AG-1 
Agricultural T^trict for additions or enlargeoMnts to 
existing single family dweUings. More detailed 
infcnnation is availabte in the Department (tf PUuming. 
Plats with more detaUed mfonnation are available in 
the Department (rfnamui^. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Robert J. Scott 

[Xrector of Ranning 

IQ1.112T4/6VB 



w^Hmm 



^^mm^^m^^m 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 6. 1983 17 



Classified Ads 



1. 



U 



I. 



GREAT BUDGE HIGH 
SCHOOL STADIUM 
HIAIN A(X MPROVBffiNre 
aiyorCbcta^Mkc, 
Vlr^Bia 
The City of Chesapeake, Vir- 
ginia will receive scaled bids in 
accordance with the tism, fw 
construction pf the above project 
until 2:00 o'clock p.m. local time 
on the 14th day of April, 1M3, at 
the office of the City Entineer, 
Department of Public Works, 
Engineerini Division, 
Chesapeake Civic Center, 
Public Service Building, Alber- 
marle Drive, Chesapeake, , 
Virginia. Bids will be publicly 
opened and read aloud at that 
time. Bids are to be submitted on 
the atuched form of the Bid Pr- 
oposal, in sealed envelopes 
bearing the bidders name and 
address and clearly marked "Bid 
on Drainage Improvements 
Great Bridge High School 
Stadium. 

Drawings and SpeciHcations 
may be examined without charge 
at the offlce of the Engineering 
Administrator, Department of 
Public Works, Engineering 
Division, City of Chesapeake, 
Civic Center, Public Services 
Building, Albermarle Drive, 
Chesapeake, Virginia; Tidewater 
Area Business and Contractors 



MOMU NOMI 
SKiimNO 

14'ii72' Trwfcr 

^295 



SWMjr 



853-7689 

nso ciOmwiu 10. 



Association (T. A. B.C. A), 
ProfCttioaal Ans Building, 142 
West York Street, Suite 413, 
Norfolk, Virginia 23SIO; 
Build^s and Contracion Ex- 
change, Inc., 210 E. 21st Street, 
Norfcrik, Virginia 23JI7; f . W. 
Dodge Reports, 16 Koger 
ExKUtive Center, Norfdk, Va. 
23S02. Copies of the Drawings 
and Spedflcations may be ob- 
tained from the Engineer upon 
tlw deposit of Thirty Dollars 
(S30.00), which sum will be 
refunded upon return of the 
Drawings and Spcciflcatioas in 
good condition within ten (10) 
days after the date on which bids 
were received. 

Bidden who wish to be shown 
over the work by representatives 
of the Public Works Department 
should attend a Pre-Bid Con- 
ferenM at 10:00 a.m. local time 
on April 7, 1%3 at the intersec- 
ti<m of Mount Pleasant Road 
and Stadium Drive. 

Bidders are required under 
Title 54, Chapter 7, Article I, 
Code of Virginia to show eviden- 
ce that they possess a current 
license from the State Board of 
Contractors to engage in con- 
tracting. The Bidder shiUl place 
in the outside of the envelope 
containing his bid over his 
signature the following notation 
"licensed Virginia Contractor 
Nn. a nd "Chesapeake 
Contractors License No., " 



Each Proposal must be ac- 
companied by a bid bond in the 
amount equal to not less than 
five percent (5%) of the 
proposal. 

The City of Chesapeake ex- 
pressly reserves the right to reject 



dS 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Hoi^ silts iff I salt 

People Planning 

Homes A. Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 
333 Providence Rd. 



CALL 464-9317 




HOME 

" tofflWVEMENT 

feoOD siMltioiii for all 

pnrposes. Convert 

garage, raiac dormera. 

Any type of improv- 
ment. Bathroom and 
Kitchen remodeling. 

R.H. BLACK 

3W.8359 397-7178 



High Quality At Low Pria 

BABY 
BAZAAR 

Baby Furniture by Basscit 

Nursery Accessories 

Special (iil'ts lor Special Babies 

FREE LAY-AWAY 

•MtTIR CAHO - W«* 

467-5032 

ISMLynnkaveaniw}. 

ia I'atf Ran 

M-F 104 Sal la-S 



^ Va. Stud Dog Registry 
& FrN Puppy Referral. 

List your stud Dog or puppy 
litter. Very Reasonable. 

Nancy Dunn... 495-1019 

Open 9 am-7 pm. 

Closed Wed. it 4^ 



HORSESHOEING 

PrafaHioniFanter, 

CoavciMvc Pikca. IS Yean 

Expcfteace. Cal: 

EDSPEAKMAN, 

42M325 




Commercial & Residential 

Design - Build 

DcRn P. Edwards, Inc. 



Room Additions 

Garages 

Decks 

Chesi4)«Uce 

804-421-927S 



RonodeUng 

ConoreteWorlc 

New H(HM Consructions 

919-261-2901 



1. AimmiiiceiiMnts 



D 






any or all proposals, to waive 
any informalities in the 
propc»al$ received, and to accept 
that proposal which in its 
judgement best serves the interest 
of the City. 

Drainage Improvements to 
Great Bridge High School 
Stadium consists of ap- 
proximately MO ( i: ) L.F. of 13" 
storm drainage pipe and ap- 
putenances, ditch regarding, and 
pavement restoration. 

All bids must be in strict com- 
pliance with the provisimis of the 
Invitation to Bid section of the 
contract documents for "Great 
Bridge High School Stadium" 

In case of a claimed error, the 
bidder must give notice in writing 
of his claim or right to withdraw 
his bid within two (2) business 
days after the conclusion of the 
bid opening. 
I2TA-13 

INCOME TAX • and Account- 
ing (including tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. (near 
Rosemont Rd.) Call 463-6606. 

ITFN 

CAREER EXPLORATION 
Semiitar - Identify your skillt, sec 
new alternatives, plan your 
future. April 28-29. Call for in- 
formation. 463-2788. 

14T4-20 

CREDIT PROBLEMS? Receive 
a Mastercard or Visa, Guaran- 
teed, Nobody refused; for free 
Brochure send Self Addressed 
Stamped envelope to CREDIT 
DATA, Po. O. Box 271084, 
Dallas Texas 75227 or call 
ANYTIME 214-324-5944. 

' I4T4-27 

FISHING SITES WANTED - 

Physician desires permission to 

Tish your private pond or lake. 

Fish returned to water. 547-501 1 

days. 

I2T4-13 

FLEA MARKET - Women of 
Wesleyan Flea Market, April 
9th, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Good 
spaces available. Benefits 
college. 461-3232, ext. 287 or 
423-0408. 

I IT 4-6 

FREE - PREPARATORY cour- 
se for Real Estate License 
examination. For details call 
Russell Harrison 420-3120 or 
nights 547-5500. HIGGINGS 
REALTY INC. 

l-4t-4/6 

JUNK CARS - Wrecked or run- 
ning cash-free towing. We also 
buy used radiators and batteries. 
7 days a week. Call 487-9222 or 
after 6 p.m. 857-5570. 

ITFN 



ATTENTION MiUTARY - E-4 

to E-9: Dental Plan, Champus 

Aid, diKOunu on stertot, autos. 

Low rate auto, lite in^unwoe 

through NCOA Membership. 

Pete Schuhl USN (RET) 463- 

««90. 

24T4-27 

LADY WrrH A JEEP, (Age 47) 
would like to meet a man with a 
boat. Object is out-door 
recreation. Reply to P. O. box 
1282, Virginia Beach, Va. 234SI. 
2CT4-6 

ORIENTAL GIRU SEEK 

American men for fricndiMp, 
marriage. Individual introduc- 
tions, information photot S2. 
Equator, Box S7031I-A1S, 
Miami, Fla. 33IS7. 
24T4-I 3 

■ECnVE A MASmCARD 

.OR Vm. OiimaMd, aobody 
fcfuMd; for tnt brodiwt call 
Howe of Credtt, ioU Dm l-WO- 
4*2-1531 anytima. 

- 2TPN 



4.JUrtM 



/ 




.aXI20iffcliB«fii 

$795.00 

Learing Tcms Available 

STATE LINE BUILDERS 

Gtuvga • UtUity Barns • Any Site 

Uthw^rlM 
Moy«ek,N.C.Z79SI 



B 



jnf LEWIS 



>-OUR PRIMTED WORD' 
IS QUALITV 



SFECIALl 

•59.95 




CALL BRAD AT 



'12 MONTECARLO • Jade 
green exterior, velour interior. 
Power options, tih wheel, A/C, 
cruise control!, excellent con- 
dition, low mileage, $85,00. Call 
547-8937. 

4IT4-4 

1977 OLDSMOULE Cutlass • 
I.D. number 3JS7P70I60666, 
three weeks to claim car. For in- 
formation call Clamps Texaco ' 
Jimmy Clamp. 543-6353, 221 
Campostella Rd., Chesapeake. 
4IT4-6 

VOLVO . 'ft 242 AM. FM 
cassette, A/C, also A/T, 2 door. 
4 cylinder. S5,3SO. CaU 588- 
1990. 
4IT44 

CHEVETTE - '81; 3 speed, with 
Isuzu diesel engine, 40 MPG. ex- 
cellent, S3,850or best offer. Call 
427-5795. 

4IT4-6 



7. 



1979 HONDA • 183 Twin Star, 
black, electric kkk start, dual 
exhaust. Wat S795 only SS93. 
CiJl anytime home 427-1477, 
work 463-3040. 

7TPN 



Antique Repair & 
Refinisliing 

Custon reproduclioa* 
avallaMc. If you caa laragiae 
It, I can build it. 

1T4-6 Call 424-6499 



tO.IMpW«M 



TO MIY 

SCIAP 

COPKR 



Joe M. Dadccr 
Company, Inc. 

MM9S0 



wmowra mailino, ltd. 



Aay Pwpoae Raal EsMe 

Vif^iria-NorthCaraltaa 
WriH GOOD CREIMT UP TO 

100% Of Value 

Reflaance Mortpitci 

lst,2a(l,<H'3rds 

!■ aoHc cam latcfcM as low at 

nyDCIEDIT 

wttk Mrffidaaty anally 

Guaranteed 
Approval 

Stop Foredonvn 
PiyjMliMMitsOr 

IRS 

AboVAAFHA 

OpcaTHtPM 

Sal.MTH2PM 

499-llM 
After U 



tO>IMpWaaM 



1%.HI» 



J 



2S.8MdTliliWsTfEat 



40.S«rvic« 



WANTED TO RENT • Private 
dockside space for cabin cruiser. 
Virginia Beach area only. Call 
543-2088 or 425-7657. 

84T4.20 

S-2 SAIL - BOAT, 23 feet, oat- 
board, trailer, excellent con- 
dition. Call 425-3804. 

82T44 



ROUTE SALES • WiU Hnd this 
offer attractive. S200 oppor- 
tunity to .start per week. 
Maximum opportunity, tSOO per 
week. Call: 547-2177. 
lOTFN 

TELEPHONE SALES • Mor- 
ning hours, salary and bonuses. 
No experience necessary. We 
train. Great for siudcnu and 
housewives. Call 627-1999. 
lOTFN 

ATTENTION LADIES - Under* 
cover Wear Home Un^rie Pw- 
tien. Have a party or become u 
agent. Call BcUiia - 423-1401: 
Penny - 423-1840; Gladys - MS- 
5018, Sandy -245-8764. 
10 4T 4-27 

ARE YOU KEAOY to wwk for 

something you believe laT 
Virginia A<^on it training staff 
to work on consumer Usua. 
Hours Mm. Throii^ Fri. MO 
p.m. CaU 623-7364. 

I0#r4-20 



AUTO aOUY REPAIR Instruc- 
tor in the rehabilitative Khool, 
Authorities School at the St. 
Brides Correctional Center, 
luoatcd in Chesapeake. Starting 
salary SI4,S56, depending on 
education and experience. Ap- 
plicant must be eligible for the 
vocational-education ccrtifkale, 
whidi requires a high school 
diirfoma and 6 ynrs experience 
in the trade. Send combed 
Slate applications to the 
RehabUitaiivc School Authority, 
101 N. I4ih St. Richmond, Va. 
23219 before April 20. 1983. For 
additional information call Dr. 
Don Stowers. at 804-421-7141. 

E.o.e. 

. I02T4-I3 

THE HAIR CUmaY - The 
areas fastest growing full service 
salon chain has oepnings for ex- 
perienced stylists. Guaranteed 
150.00 plus commission. Ex- 
cctteni benefit package includes 
dental, health, and life insuran- 
ce, paid vacation, free ieducation, 
and more. Come join the win- 
ning team. Call 340-9516. 
I0IT4.6 

PART TIME - Sales, need stit- 
chery lovers with desire to earn 
extra income. No deliveries, 
training. Call 486-63 17. 

104T4-27 

CAMP GROUND HELP Wan- 
ted ■ Spring and summer ap- 
plications arc now being uken 
for our rqistration desk, stores, 
swimming pools, maintenance 
department, outside ground and 
Recreational Facilitia. Apply 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday-Thur- 
sday. Best Holiday Trav-L-Park, 
1075 General Booth Blvd. Va. 
Beach, Va. or call 425-0249. 
10 IT 4-6 

MANAGER TRAINEE ■ Ap- 
plications are no« being accep- 
ted for manager trainee pmition. 
We offer good money and good 
future. For interview call 463- 
7624. 
I04TTFN . 

WRITE YOUR 
OWN PAYCHECK 

Are you tired of the same old 
routine? Are you worth more 
than you're apid? Well, it's time 
to step up. We are looking for 
dynamic and aggressive men and 
women with talent to deal with 
tbc public. If you feel you have 
these qualifications, call: 229- 
1457 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
for appointment. Ask for Amy. 
10 4T 4-27 

COUNSELLING/SALES • The 

non-commissioned and petty of- 

ncers association is in need of 

resident counsellors In the local 

area. Contact Mr. Durst. 499- 

9r8. 

lOTFN 

NEW OPENINGS - For nation- 
wide Industry, no sales. wUI 
train. $15,000 plus a year. For 
infmnation caU 1-3 1 2-93 1 -705 1 . 
I84T4-6 



SIAMESE KITTENS - Red 

Point, registered; champion 
sired, show quality, S200. 481- 
3358. 
I3TFN 

KEESHOUND PUPS - AKC? 
beautiful, great companion and 
watch dog. $150.00. Call 587- 
628:. 
13IT4-6 

GERMAN SHEPERD - AKC 

male, black and brown, 6 mos. 
old. SIOO. 461-3324. 

13 IT 4-6 

DALMATION PUPS - AKC, 
quality bred, shots and woi med. 
2 males. 8 weeks old. $175.00 
and $200.00. Call497-2547, 

13 IT4-6 

DACHSUND • Long hair 
miniture, 16 weeks. Red male, all 
shots, strictly pet, with or 
without AKC papers. 587-2083 
Breeder; waiting list available. 

13 IT 4-6 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS - 

Across from Nurd Seafood 
Restaurant. Shucked in own 
natural juci«. By quarts, pints, 
or bushels. Call 340-5171 

25-TFN 



M. EnteftshiMeiit 



FOR SALE-70 Ballroom dance 
lessons. Call Larry Dunn for 
more information 48(J^2I54. 

26-TFN 



27. Oa^^ard SdM 



SUPER YARD SALL - Dolls, 
antiques, toys, games, household 
items. Sat. April 9th, 9 a.m. (o3 
p.m. 3249 Old Mill Road, Deep 
Creek. 487-6290. 

27 IT 4-6 



18. 



WASHERS, DRYERS, Ranges. 
Refrigerators. Reasonable rates. 
Call 4604512. 
^___ 15 4T 4-27 

WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE - 

Any major appliances. Call 547- 

4050. 

1 5 4T 4-27 

DISHWASHER - Needs gasket. 
$25. Call 420-7719. 

I5TFN 



lt.ArtlclMF»rSal« 



EAGLE-ULTRAUGHT, Never 
flown with instruments. Instruc- 
tion and spare parts. $4,950. 855- 
1199 
I6IT4-6 

AQUARIUMS - 4 ten gallon plus 
one 20 gallon tank complete. 
Also 55 gallon tank complete. 
Prices most reasonable. Call 467- 
6699. 

I6IT4-6 

FOUR RIMS AND HUBCAPS - 

Fiu W ton Ford truck... size 16 
by 5 lugs. Call 547-8812. 
16 IT 4-6 

TELEPHONE - Cordless, 

receive or call out, 700 feet away, 

one way paging, still in box. $90. 

483-2728. 

IT 4-6 

SWIMMING POOL SUDE - 

$250. Oalvlnizetf Big T Gym set. 
$20. 3 by 5 black slate black 
board. $15. Call 420-7719. 

I6TFN 



17. FwnHiirt 



FURNITURE REFINISHED - 

Why buy new? Free pick-up and 
delivery. Free estimates. Price 
most reasonable. 424-4899. Also 
quality upholstery work. Call 
467-9684. 

I7 4T5-3 



lf.Anti«iM 



11. PitHitaB WiatM 



GENEBAL HOUSE Cleaning 
rdiaUc and experienced. Call 
340-13W. .IITFN. 

EXPERIENCED Man and Lady 
willing to do cinning; clean 
vacant apartment buildings, yard 
cleaning, work u companion, do 
day work. Call 622-0792. 
1 1 4T 4-27 

MALE PRACTICAL NURSE - 

Certified aiHl licensed. 10 yean 
experience in hospital and 
midcnlial nursing. Any shift. 
ReferencM. Call 625-7093. 
II IT 4-6 

SEWING • Reas<Hiable nAt, aU 
types. CaU 463-2173. 

II IT 4-6 



21.TtltvWN/ttorM 




12. 



When SometUng Nceib 
Building or Reimired, Yon Need 

BLACK 

BROS. 




wnwcnm/coutaojoti 

Conduct dyMmk personal and 
professional dcvclopncnt 
procraas. FuU or part time, in- 
dapewdcwt budncn opportunity. 
Rrftdmum iavettiBcnt. CaU 463- 
2788. 
12 4T 4-20 

ATTENTION: Flea Market 
Dealers! toy at wholesale and 
below wholesale. Independent 
Sales. 1616 Mwlowlake Dr. 
NOTft.tk. or caU 137-4007. 

I2TFN 

9 AR OF THE SEA SCHOOL 
Ftea Market - Sat. May 14th 10- 
7:30. ^n. May 15th 9-2. Rent 
indoor taMc im>w. $13.50 both 
(fays or $10.00 Sal. oidy. CaU: 
428-^53 or 481IS68. 
12 4T 4-27 

mJUt AND GREY Ftea Market 
- luidc aad ouuidc spaces. 
Grand opnfaig ^eciab on mi- 
tUe laMet. IMO Nevada Ave.. 
NBrfolk.'Cal- 133-9321. Open 
Frid«r.Sai.«idS«n. 

I24T5-3 



22.it««inF 



24.WaRtodT*linr, 



FIREWOOD • Oak, maple, 
black maple, and pine. Split and 
free delivery, $70. a cord'. Call 
424-9270. 

28174-6 



J 



ANTIQUE KITCHEN 

Wood/coal stove. Good con- 
didon. CaU days at 547-4571 af- 
ter 6 caU 483-4684. 

18TFN 

IVORY COLLECTION - 
Statues. Nctsike, Oriental 
screens, silks. Cloisonne neck- 
taces; Vases and Box^. 1804 
Granby St., 625-9119. Daily 10- 
5. 

I8TFN 



19. 



COLS MKES - 20 inch. $15. 10 
speed $35. 3 speed $25. CaU 420- 

7719. 

19 TFN 



REALffiTIC MCEIVER - STA 

225, 65 watu per channd. Ex- 
ceUcnt condition. $225. Call 547- 
4571 ask for Mike or after 5:00 
caa«04933. 
21-TFN 

HAKS STEREO • AM/FM, 8 
trade, turn Ubie. $50. CaU 420- 
7719. 

2I4TTFN 



Home Improvemeiil 

Spcciali.<its 
•Building t'tMilradi>r»Roofs^"arportii 
• Bath Remodel«««Room ^MiliMi 
•Aluminum SdiniB^Kilchen Reoiod^ii 

5^-7318 



Hmrfii':. 



,Jjr. 



ImtUSr 



Mikii 




IliCa. 



29.Law«A6RNM 



ConmerdaT-TtetidenUai 
Landscaping Services 
TORO Sprinkler Systems In- 
stalled. North Landing Nursery 
(Next to Farmers Market), 
Virginia Beach. 427-6886 

. 22IEN 

LANDSCAPING SERVICE • 
Lawn and Garden restoration, 
grading and seeding. Free 
estimates. 421-7350. 
28 TFN 

MULCH-BUTLER AND SON 

Shredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any si2e. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
while on sale. We deliver in one 
day. 853-0250 or 855-7467. 
29 TFN 

WALKER AND SONS 
TREE SERVICE 

Removal, topping, stump grin- 
ding, crane service, fully insured. 
Free estimates, 488-9061 
anytime. 
294T5-4 

SHURBS (Container grown, I 
gal. and up) Helleri, Jumpers, 
Acuba, Photinia, Ligustrum, 
Liriope. Also trees. $4.00 to 
$1 1 .00. Below retail and healthy. 
481-0736. 

> 29 IT 4-6 



TRKASURES AND JUNK • 

Don't throw it away. I'll come 
and get it. Call 545-0459 or 545- 
1396. 

404T5-6 

CARPET CLEANING and in- 
stalling. Contact Arnold, 488- 
7138. 
404T5-3 

ANDEUON REMODEUNG • 

AU types of home repairs. Pain- 
ting, roofing, tiding, carpentry, 
etc. Work guaranteed. Free 
estimates. Insured and bmidcd. 
CaU 588-2558. 

40 TFN 

TYPING SERVICE - For 
businesses and individuals. 7 
days a week. IBM Selfctric. 
Reasonable rates. Call either 
467-7112. KemptviUc area, or 
463-0236. Hilltop/Pembroke 
area. 

40 TFN 

LET US CLEAN Your Office. 
Any schedule that is convenient 
for you. You nn afford our 
prices. 623-0741 for free 
estimates. Ask for LouiK. 

404T5-3 

INCOME TAX SERVICE • 
Over 25 years combined ex- 
perience, low tax fees, same day 
service. Call Commonwealth for 
free estimate, 461-4308. 

40 774-6 



42.CIMte« 



LADIES JEWEUY FOR SAU 

One teiUct cockttf ring with 45 
^fMtih and b 14 cant ydow 
floU. Abo a 14 carat white ^>ld 
23 j«««l lades BidiDva watch. 
Rii« apprised at $3400 and 
watdi iw^ted at $1900. wm 
itD efthcr fw half the appruMd 
vahie. CaU 347-0158 after 5:00 
pja. 22 TFN 



CHILD CARE - Need two 
children any age. exccUent care 
and conditions, fuU time, Kem- 
psville/CHarlettown area. After 
6 p.m.. Call 467-7 114...,^ 

43 «T 4-13 



43. 



CONCRETE • Quality work 
done on driveways, sidewalks, 
patios and pool decks, etc. New 
or old construction. Qall Scott. 

482-2672. 

43 4T 4-27 



45. 



32. BmiiMst Fm-R«H 



STORES AND STORAGE areas 

- All sizes. Properties unlimited. 
Marvin Goldfarb. 399-8390, 484- 
1275. 

32TFN 



PRESTON PEST CX)NTROL • 

We don't require a contract, 
special price on commercial and 
apartments, monthly rate, mott 
5 room homes or mobile hornet 
$15. CaU for free etUmatc at 543- 
1898. 

*34T4-6 

MASTER PEST Conuol - 
Scientific rxtermination. Sand 
4fld moisture control, windowiUI 
and joicc repair, houte jacUnt. 
Free Termite inspection. $5 off 
on termiu control. $50 off on 
roach control with this ad. 
F.H.A. & V.A. reporu given. 
CaU 487-4024. 

45-66t-3/9^ 



33. ApartaMRts For iwit 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, Apartments for adults. 1 
and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
2 bedroom lownhouses. We pay 
heat and hot water. The Pines. 
Call 468-2000. 

., 33-TFN 

APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS • Great Bridge. 4 
locations, one aiui 2 bedroom 
apartments. From $260. Rental 
office, 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

33 TFN 



RIDING LESSONS - English 
and Western starts April Sth. 
461-4470. DeniK Weaver. 

48 IT 4-6 



MOVING • Cleaning and 
Hauling of all Unds. CaU 343- 
2697. 

49 4T 4-27 



SI. 



3t. IHrtWi Hiniii 



HOLIDAY - 1975. excellent 
condition, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 
and appliances, new vinyl skir- 
ting, plus nuny exras. Moving 
must sell. Home must be moved. 
$9,400 or best offer. Call 468- 
0770. If no answer call 427-2176. 
38 TFN 

CONER - '82 14 by 70. 2 
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, i^ntral 
air, fireplace, fenced yard, shed. 
Woodshire Trailer Park. 
Chetaprake. CaU 487-2936. 

38 4T 4-27 



WALLPAPERING AND 

Painting • Fast and friendly ser- 
vice, local references furnish^. 
Call us for a free estimatt. Ar- 
thur and Company Redecorating 
Conractors. 420-3478. 
51 TFN 

PAINTING • Large or smaU 
jobs. Interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. Refnences available upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. ' 

51 TFN 



1 



S2. 



CASH PAID - Virginia Beach 
Aittique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiqaes, o>d furniture, docks, 
^Bttware. lamps, china, oil paia- 
tfi^, orioital ru|t. old iron and 
aatfqwe toys. We buy one piece 
or o^c houtefulls. Ako, ^Md 
toiAHre. CaU 422-4477 
1 8 a.n. and 6 p.m. 

24 TFN 

TABU SAW • Prefer carWde 
1Mb. Wi pv cart- Ctfl 07- 
$099 ■ - S p.a. A* f or Lia. 



L ft L PLUMBING. Heating, 
and Airconditioning; Repair and 
new work-sewer lines, water 
heaters, faucetts repaired and 
drains unstopped. 24 hours. Call 
853-0056. 
394T5-4 

BOOKKEEPING SERVICE - 

Including quarterly payroll , 
reports and bank aoxmnt recon- 
dUation. Specializing in smaU 
proprietorships. Pick up and 
delivery. Retired professional. 
Call 420-5624. 

39 TFN 

INCmiE TAX - and Account- 
ing (iochiding,tax audiu). Mario 
Voiditti, fcKiner Revenue Agoit, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd.. (netf 
RMonont Rd.) CaU 463-6601. 

■ 39-TFN 

BOOKKEEPING - Monthly 
balance-sheet, PAL detailed 
trial balance from your checks 
and reodpts, stubs, w r^ter 
l^Mt. 941 't vid VA-5't. Up to 
200 checkbook trantactiont 
monthly: $45. Payables, recav- 
tMe, tmaU payroU. Chest|«eake 
o^.Catt42»6623. 

39-TFN 

SHARPENING - Saws, knvcs. 
scissors, blades, almost 
anything. Reasonable rates. 
Work vitfanteed. CaU 547 7645. 
39 TFN 



LEIGH PHOTOGRAPHIC 

Service • Beautiful Wedding 
Memories - Photograi^y For 
Any Occasion. CaU 482-1312 
Today. "Tlie Wedding Photo- 
grapliers". 

52 TFN 



BATHROOM ROf OOEUNC - 

Old and new. Specializing in 
ceramic tile walls and floor 
coverii«. ReatonaUc rata. Free 
estimates. 20 years experience In 
Tidewater area. Small and large 
jotM. Guarantee all work. Call 
547-4774 anytime. 

55 TFN 



8^^ vVwH^S 



KARS KWINC Miujams - 

I with caMoA. $73. I withoiil 
c^nacl $23. Cidi 420-7719. 

36 TFN 



Receive a MatM i cifi m Vita. 
Guaraaiead, Mta^ p^mA ior 
free iradwt Miri Sitf Ad- 

Onto 0«a. In ZrMS4. 1 
TcsM 7^27 or Cai 
214-324-^44. 



■■lai 



■tf 



118 Virginia Beach Sun. April 6, 1983 



"Total Performance 




Pontiac's Philosophy Of Driving 
Excitement 




Tommy Gibbs 

"Customer Satisfaction'* 



The beauty of Pontiac's 
concept of "totar perfor- 
mace" is that every Pon- 
tiac model is designed and 
; engineered to provide an 
I exciting blend of power 
- and efficiency that's not 
; only right for today, but is 
■ also consistent with each 
model's character. If your 
looking for pure driving 
: excitement in a trim, ef- 
ficient size, the Pontiac 
2000 is the right car for 
you. You'll know it the 
instant you rev up the 4- 
cylinder overhead cam 
engine with electronic fuel 
injection and drop the 5- 
speed into gear - this front 
wheel-drive performer has 

what it takes. 

Pontiac 2000 Hatch- 
back. Your in- 
stinct tell you the sick SE 
Hatchback is desisned tn 



be driven. Slip behind the 
wheel and your instincts 
are confirmed. 

The rally gages and tack 
in front of you lare stan- 
dard this year. So are 
power rack and pinion 
steering and the Formula 
steering wheel. A glance 
in the rearview mirror 
reveals the functional 
spoiler in the back. It's 
also standard for '83. 

Now take Pontiac 2000 
SE to the street and feel 
the excitement as the taut 
rally handling suspenion 
does it's stuff. 
Exhilarating is the only 
word for it. 

Pontiac 2000 Coupe. 
The looks alone are 
enough to convince most 
people the Pontiac 2000 



Coupe is anything but 
dull. But if you need even 
more proof, check out the 
remarkable response and 
efficiency of the standard 
i.8 liter overhead cam 
engine with electronic fuel 
injection. Fully reclining 
front bucket seats and cut- 
pile carpeting are stan- 
dard. 

Pontiac 2000 Sunbird 
Convertible. It comes 
complete with power- 
assisted top, windows and 
steering. What's the bad 
news? Production will be 
very limited so don't wait 
too long! 

Pontiac 2000 Sedan. 
The LE Sedan is a 
thoughtful blend of per- 
formance, style and com- 
fort. 



A S-speed gearbox is 
standard, and is the rack 
and pinion steering, front- 
wheel drive and MacPher- 
son strut front suspension 
components that 
distinguish all Pontiac 
2000 models. 

Pontiac 2000 LE 
Wagon. The new 2000 LE 
Wagon is the latest in a 
long line of exciting Pon- 
tiac wagons. It's sporty 
and spunky, and designed 
to be as much fun to drive 
as it is hardworking. 

A floor-mounted 5- 
speed, side-window 
defoggers and rack and 
pinion steering are just f 
few of the features you*lI 
love. As you can see, 
there's a Pontiac iOOO 
model for you. Come in 
and drive one today! 



Perry Buick 




461-8855 



1983 Presents The 

Buick 
Full Line 

PERRY BUICK 



66S3 VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
IN NORFOLK AT NEWTOWN ROAD 



SERVING TIDEWATER OVER 52 YEARS 




FINAL CLEARANCE 

ON 1982 MODELS 



1912 CITATION 

4 door, luto., power steering, 

stereo, power brakes. Slock 

116806 

Ym San SI, MS. 17 



•7,350" 



19S2CHEVETTE 

2 Door, sun roof, stripes. Slock 

#6795. 

yaaS«>eSl,2«.S( 



»5,389«' 



19S2S- 10 PICK-UP 
TRUCK 

Aula , cxlru. Slock #6614. 
VMSavtSIJSSJI 



'7,167" 



19S2 CAVALIER 

4door, auio.. Slock 16262 
Vo«Sa«(SIJ74.r 



'7,785»' 



I9»2 CORVETTE 

T-lufH-gla&k iopj, pi)«rr *in 
dows, locks, seau. auio. At, 
stereo casseiic. Siock*6^.n 
VmSa>iS4,tlt.4S 



»17,833" 



klMmVt lowot prices, lowest piymento 

WE GUARANTEE IT. 

(WMIc They Last) 



LVNNHAVEN PKWY. AT 
VA. BEACH BLVD. 

486-2222 








You don't give up 

a thing at Budget where you're #1 

• Low rates by the day, weekend or longer 
• Free pick up and delivery 
• Most major credit cards honored 
• For out-of-town reservations, toll free- 
dial "1" & then 800-527-0700 
FOR LOCAL RESERVATIONS CALL 

ISorfolk Inlenialional Airport - Norfolk, Vi MM03S 

6400 N. MililV) Hw$. • Norfolk, Va ^-lOM 

3316 Virginia Btach Blvd. - Virginia BMch, Va 340-S413 

Patfkk He nr> Airport - Newport Ntwi, Va I74-S794 

1 1400 Jefferson Ave. - Newport Newi, Va S99-3152 

1740 Pocahontas Trail - WiMansbnrg. Va 220-3S2S 



iBiiilgeti 



< iiiaii i ap 



Have you ever turned 
your car into a service 
department to get 
something minor checlced 
and planned on paying a 
few dollars and discovered 
when you picked it up you 
have a couple hundred 
dollar bill staring at you? 
Well Tommy Gibbs, 
General Manager of 
Parkway Pontiac-Volvo, 
has developed a position 
which he thinks is unique 
to service departments. 
He has created a "Service 
Customer Relations 
Manager" who's sole duty 
is to ensure the customer is 
taken care of. This starts 
from when the customer 
first turns his car into the 
service department and 
continues until he and the 
manager review the bill to 
ensure everything is 
correct. If for some 
reason there is a problem 
with the bill, the manager 
has the authority to rectify 
the problem, right on the 
spot. Can you imagine 
that! No more getting 
passed from one manager 
to another to get satisfac- 
tion. 

You may think 
"Chicken Man" is crazy, 
but this is just another 
step Tommy Gibbs has 
taken to ensure your 
problems will be taken 
care of. Customer 
Satisfaction is Parkway's 
number one commitment, 
and today more than ever, 
this is quite evident. 

Another of Tommy's 
ways of showing his com- 



mitment is by making each 
new car customer eligible 
to become a Gold Card 
customer. 

As a Gold Card cust- 
omer at Parkway, your first 
two years of factory 
recommended maintenance 
is Free. You also receive 
free towing withing a 25- 
mik radius in the event of a 
problem, also the use of a 
free loaner car if the repair 
WOTk will taken longer than 
two hours. 

If you have a problem as 
a Gold Card customer, you 
have a direct-line phone 
number to contact Tonuny 
for help. In addition, 
anytime you bring in your 
car for service, he'U get it 
washed for your free. 

Parkway is proud of its 

Gold Card pro-am and 
shows its commitment to 
customer satisfaction as 
well as giving the com- 
munity a dealership it can 
be proud of. 

Under the direction of 
Butch Parker, Service 
Director, Parkway's service 
dept. is the largest in 
Tidewater for Volvo ser- 
vice. For any make car. 
Parkway offers the finest 
technicians and the most 
updated equipment 
available to handle your 
automotive needs. 

Under the leadership of 
Mike Futrell, new car 
manager; Gene Hassell , 
used car maiuger; and 
George Brown, iNtsiness 
manager, Tommy feels he 
has one of the most 
professional groups of sales 
people to help you. 



1982 J-2000 

OR 

1982 FORD 

EXP'S 




$ 



139 



MONTH 



Cash Price $5156, Down Payment 
, $86j Finance Charges $1602, Total 
Payment $6672, Total Deferred 
Payment $6758, Used Car APR 
14.54%, 48 Mos., With Approved 
Credit. 




Parkway ,nc 

PONT I AC-VOLVO*/ 

1800 Greenbrier Parkway 
Chesapeake, Virginia 23320 

420-5450 

DMV 133 



VANTASTIC SPRING SALE 

On AH Custom Vans 



AS LOW AS 



$ 



7995 



^NO ONE ANYWHERE WILL OUT 
SELL OR OUT TRADE VIRGINIA'S 
LARGEST VAN DEALER. 





463-6100 



3443 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Next To Princess Anne Plaza 

DMV8S02 



Tidewater's Largest 

Inventory Of 

S-10 and K-10 4x4 

Pick-Up Trucks 




Up To 

*2000»" 
Discount! 

(With This Ad) 

Kline Chevrolet 

U9S S. MiUtary Hwy. 

3 Mi. South of MUUary drcle 

424-1811 




WYNNE MOTOR 
CORP. 



WANM MOIOKCORH. 



-tlll-OSdll 



The Vir ginia Beach S un 

S7tk Year. Na. 1«. Vlr«lBla Bnek. V ^^p^^ Aptfl 13. IfB ____^_^_ ,,q.u>( ^^^_,^_^II_ 



yytfcYmr. No. 15, Vtrflaia Btmdt, V 




By Greg Goldfarb 

Sun Editor 

The Virginia Beach city council isn't sure about it. 
atizens don't want it. But the U.S. Army wants to 
station a fleet of assault vehicles at the Little Creek 
Naval Amphibious Base in Virginia Beach, and use Fort 
StcH7, Dam Neck and Camp Pendleton beaches for 
training. 

Why the objections from a city and community which 
traditicxially acconmodates the military and is gener- 
ally appreciative of its economic presence? Because of 
concerns over ndse, public safety, and the environ- 
ment. 

The U.S.Army wasn't required to hold a public 
hearing the the matter in 1976 when it stationed two 
LACV-30's at Fart StCM-y. The training base now has 13 
of them. lACV-30 stands fw Lighter, Amphibian Air 
Cushion Vehicle - 30 ton payload. The Navy, however, 
is not so fortunate. In 1978, the National Council on 
EnvircMunental Quality voted a change in the National 
Environmental Policy Act which allowed fw the recent 
Navy hosted public hearing ax the question at Thalia 
Elementary Schod. About 100 citizens at the hearing 
protested the Navy's plans to station 54 LCACs at 
Little Greek and use three other local bases for training 
exercises. WAC stands for landing craft air cushion. 

The story of protest in which the Navy finds itself 
engulfed, according ' to Fort Story's commanding 
officer, Col. James C. Blewster, is partly the Army's 
fault. 



ance 1976, Wewster said, there had not been one 
Virginia Beach ccwnplaint over the use of the 
LACV-30's; that is, until recently when, on two 
separate occasions, the jet fuel driven crafts roared 
ashore at I^nnhaven tolet. and.also visite^jj^deejnlet^ 

"My guess would be, of course a lot 
depends on how the wind is blowing, 
but I'm sure you can hear them five 
miles away. I don't doubt it for a 
minute that you can hear it that far 
away . . . it wouldn't be an irritation 
over 1,000 yards out at all to me, but 
that's not to say that it might not be to 
someone else." - Blewster 

The two unauthorized and unscheduled visits so dose 
to residential dwellings brought a flood of calls to 
Blewster's office. Blewster said technically, the pilots 
did not vidate any laws. Nevertheless, running the 
ndsy crafts that close to shwe was not a good idea. 

"There were two unfortunate incidents in which our 
operators todc these crafts into both the Rudec and 
Lynnhaven inlets," Blewster said. "There's no 
See CRAFTS, Pige 5 



Tour Of America 

Tour of America cyclists shoot past the camera at 57th Street and Attantk Avenue. The 2S5-milc three- 
Ms race began in Virginia Beach and ended In Washington, D.C. The wlaaer was Dntchman Bert Ooster- 



boMk. Hb time was 9:4S:47 




The mighty propellers of t^ LACV-30 



BIEDay, 

Mrs. Bush 

Coming To 

Beach 

Businesses, 

And Teachers 

Matched 




Mrs. Bush 



Thirty-three Virginia Beach businesses will host 116 
Virginia Beach teachers smd guidance counselors 
during the city's first Business-Industry-Education 
Day, to take place on Tuesday, April 19 beginning at 9 

a.m. ~ . . •»». 

The BDE Day will indude mormng sessions with 
business execiuives and edwators at local business 
iocatioos from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. From 12:30 to 2 
p.m. is lunch, after which time all BIE Day participants 
will gather at the Virginia Beach PaviUon from 2 to 2:30 
for the afternoon session. Evaluations and 
SeeBIE,Pa«e6 




Dinner 
To Honor 
Brickell 

The Virginia Beach Jay- 
cees has annc^pccd that 
Dr. Edward >^ Brickell 
has b££nj>dectcd as the 
recipient of the First Citi- 
zen of Virginia Beach 
Award for 1982. A ban- 
quet will be held in honw 
of Dr. Brickell on Friday, 
Apt^ 22 at the Black 
Ai^us Restuarant in Vir- 
ginia Beach. The guest 
speaker for the event will 
be WAVY-TV newscaster, 
B(* Grip. 

Dr. Brickell was cited 
not only for excelling in 
the field of education, but 
also for devoting much of 
his time to civic affairs. 
Dr. Brickell is a native of 
Tidewater and the Chief 
Superintendent of Vir- 
ginia Beach Public 
Schools. He holds a B.A. 
in English fron the Col- 
lege of William and Mary, 
an M.A. in Humanities 
fftxU'the University of 
Chicago, and a Doctorate' 
of Education fr«nthe Col- 
lege of William and Mary. 
Dr. Brickell is currently 
the "senior" school 
superintendent in the 
Commonwealth of Vir- 
ginia. In 1980, he was 
named one of the t(^ 100 
Schod Administrators in 
North America by the 
•"Executive Educator." 




SpeUing Bee Championship 



Brickell 

In addition to educa- 
tional interests. Dr. 
Brickell has contributed 
substantially to the health 
care, recreational, and 
civic betterment of the 
aty. He has been recog- 
nized locally, regionally 
and nation wide as a 
humanitarian dedicated to 
his profession and to the 
City of Virginia Beach. 
' The awards banquet 
will begin at 6 p.m. with 
dinfl^r being served at 
7: lis p.m. Anyone wishing 
to attend must make 
reservations by writing 
project chairman David 
M. Waronker, 3441 Daf- 
fodil Crescent, Virginia 
Beach, Va. 23456; or call- 
ing 628-5026 during busi- 
ness hours. 

The cost is $20 a person 
and reservaticHis must be 
made by Wednesday, 
April 20. 



Crime Golf Benefit Set 



Arrangements continue 
for the 1st Annual 
Virginia Beach Crime 
Solvers Golf Tournament 
to be held at Hell's Point 
Golf Course, Virginia 
Beach, Friday, May 6 at 
12:30 p.m. with par- 
ticipation by notable 
celebrities. Two new 
automobiles, hole-in-one 
prizes and other gifts and 
prizes will be presented to 
all partidpating golfers. 

Applications are being 
sold by the Virginia Beach 
Crime Solvers Board of 
Directors. Applications 



are also attached to 
posters displayed 
throughout Tidewater at 
your local F & M Bank 
lobbies. Golf Course Pro 
Shops, Sporting Good 
Stores, and various other 
locations. 

Tax deductible 
donation per player is 
$100. Funds will be 
utilized totally to support 
the Virginia Beach Crime 
Solvers Reward Program. 

For additional infor- 
mation call 427-9205 or 
721-3400. 



The four elementary 
area elimination rounds 
have been completed; 
next, the winners will 
meet in the championship 
round of the 1983 Virginia 
Beach Public Schools 
Spelling Bee, to be held 
Wednesday, Arpil 20, at 
First Colonial High. The 
Spelling Bee starts at 7:30 
p.m. 

The four elementary 
winners compete in the 
first section of the finals, 
fdlowed by the 16 final- 
ists of the Junior high 
competition. The ^nior 
high championship round 
also includes winners 
from elementary schods 
with seventh grades and 
the division's two inter- 
mediate schools. 

The final will pit the 
winners of the seven sen- 
ior high schods, and the 
round should prove quite 
competitive. Jennifer Shu 
will be representing 
Green Run High Schod; 
she won the senior high 
match last year. The 
runner-up last year was 
Omstoi^r O'Neill, who 
again will represent Cox 
Ifigh School. 

The Bee will have three 
members of one family 
participating at each 
level. Jennifer's sister. 
Margaret, was the winner 
at Brandon Junior High, 
and their sister, Pauline, a 
fourth grader at Roaemont 
Elementary, won the Area 
2 elementary elimination 
round. 

Other elementary reg- 
ioial winners are Kim- 
beriy Yank, a sixth grader 
at Kemps Landing Inter- 
mediate, Area 1; Brian 
Cat(xi, a sixth grader at 
Windsor Oaks Elemen- 
tary, Area 3; and Jennifer 
Hicks, a sixth grader at 
Malibu Elementary, Area 
4. The elementary rounds 
were necessary because of 
the large number of ele- 
mentary schools. 

The juniw high, or 
grades 7 through 9, com- 
petition also will feature 
Jimmy Qutsinger, 8th 
grade, Bayside Junior: 
Mary Davis, grade 9, 



Plaza Junior; Paul Dum- 
lao, grade 7, John B. Dey 
Elementary; Barbara Ell- 
iott, grade 8, Lynnhaven 
Junior; Patricia Fabunan, 
grade 7, Malibu Elemen- 
tary; Melanie Lazaro, 
grade 7, Virginia Beach 
Junior; Kevin Lee, grade 
7, Kempsville Junior; 
Marie Maguire, grade 7, 
Williams Intermediate; 
Scott Ryan, grade 7, In- 
dependence Junior; Jen- 
nifer Simms, grade 7, 
Princess Anne Junior; 
Kiaran Snyder, grade 7, 
King's Grant Elementary; 
and Scott Tanner, grade 
7, Kemps Landing Inter- 
mediate. 

The other senior high 
competitors will be Kris 
Faust, grade 12, Princess 
Anne High; Linda Hof- 
foss, grade 11. First Cd- 
oniai; Deborah Nelson, 
grade 12, Bayside High; 
Scott Wayne, grade 11, 
Kellam High; and Cindi 
Wright, grade 11, 
Kempsville High. 




Hicks 

Hicks 

To Compete 

In Bee 

Jennifa Hkks, a sixth 
grader at Malibu Elemen- 
tary School, is an elemen- 
tary regional winner in the 
dty's aimual spelling bee. 
Spelling bee finals will be 
held Ml Wednesday, April 
20 at First Colonial High 
School. Jennifer is the 
daughter of Kenneth H. 
(ficks, a King's Fo-est 
resident. 



p.m. 



Register At High Schools 

The R^Mrv'i Offlcc hw aiuMMed opM 
voter rcfMnitkw for IS yew oMi at Virflaia 
Beach iUgk Schools dtfii^ the wcclis of April IS 
aid April 25. Tfce general public la Invited. The 
followiai Khcdalc has been planDcd for ttls voter 
reristrattoa iMve. 

Aprfl 18 - Green Ran Senior High School - S:3S- 

10:30 ■•■. ^ . . ,« 

i^prU IS - KdtaBi Senior Hi^ School - 12 noon 

AprO 19 -Kempsville Senior High School -StJO- 

lO'M a ■• 
April 20 - Cox Senior High School - 8:30 - lO'Jfi 

'* Apr« 21 . Prtaeess Anne Senior High - 8:3©- 

M:Mn<n. 
AprB 22 - Vocational ■ Technlcnl Center - 8d«- 

WM •.■. 
A^ 25 - first ColoiiW S«lor High ■ 8:M 8.in. 

.10<J0a.H. ,.,„ 

April » ' Bayride Sorior H%h - 8:30 •.■.-10:30 

a.M. 

ThMV iM lie tsra Mristnatrq^stran avaltal^ at 
each locailMdwtagdMae boms. 



Tmi iO^brin, an arts center wladnlstrative 
■asislut, adidra "StIU Ufe With Eggs," by 
Virginia Bcadi wM Von^ WUfworth. The 
vnitciorior won Om Mqror's Tn^hjr. 



Members 

Arts Show Winners 



If the TVXBi Virginia 
Beach Arts Center 
Monbers' Show is an in- 
diation, tho'e is a new 
Renaissance of tlM visual 
arts flowering in Ham- 
pton RMub. This year's 
show, heU recently at 
the Pavilion, was the 
largest in tlw Artii C^ter 
30 year binary. 

A total of ^0 (Higinal 
works of art frmn 216 ar- 
tists and Arts Center 
membos were featured. 
Thirty-five separate 
awards were given in five 
catMOfKS. The Mayor's 
Trophy was pr«ented by 
Cmuudlffian Bob ifma 
to Virginia Beach artist. 
Vonnie WhItworth, for 
her "Still Life with 
Egp"wi^^oto. 

The show mwt judged 
by Ton DeSmidt, 



assistant (tean for the 
School of Art at Virginia 
Commonwealth Univer- 
sity in lUchmond. "It 
was an honor to have 
been involved with this 
show," said DeSmidt 
"Indeed, all the artwork 
was worthy of an 
award." 

The top Award of Ex- 
cellence catagory 
recognize seven artbts 
who, along with Whit- 
wotUi, will have thdr 
works featured in an 
August exhibit at the Ar- 
U C^ter. Included in the 
winn^s are Pat Reim, 
Caroline Newbill, Lana 
Chandkr, Kwen Chalk- 
ley, Skippy Anderson, 
Ruth S«arlolt, and Art 
B<niwinan. 

Seven artisu in six 

See ARTS. Page? 




Officer Of The Quarter 

Master Police Officer J. L. Intler, center, b hdn^coiratntaled by CNitaIn A. E. Snath nnd Setgew 
n O Andrews on being selected "Third Precinct PoUc^Offlcv ol the Qnartcr' . 

"^t /iTr^' 4oni««.d.tlo. re«I in pnrti^Sfftar BnHar Is lie l.«^ the Vlr^nh B-ch 
PoHce DMNtftmcaL He is always courteons and qnfck to render aasistancc to dtlaew and feliow officers 
dike He promotes the Mghesl image of profeasloMllsni and pride for the Depart^t. He hextreinely 
«S.ctive with ,na«t, arreats siich as a stolen vel^ he f onnd becnnse be Stopped It for a he^bt h«lng 

wTtMs led to the ^ipwbenslon of two snhjecia, the recovery of the »«bWt and the dcMtag of fonr 
bnr^aiks. This is Jnst one example depfcling Officer Bntlw's coMclcntlou effort to be one of the best of- 
fkcfshtbisDepafttscnt."* #» 



wm 



m 



2 Virginia Beach S^ 



3^. April 13. 1983 

Sun Commentary 



> 



Editorials 



^ 

The Real Question 



Fort Story is the only U.S. Army owned 
base located on a coast, said Col. J. C. 
Blewster, commanding officer. With 
calmer Chesapeake Bay waters to the west 
arid roughter Atlantic Ocean surf on the 
east. Fort Story is ideal for amphibious 
training exercises. In the near future, 
most branches of the armed forces will 
hold joint maneuvers off Virginia Beach's 
coastline. Supplies, equipment, cargo and 
men will be transported from the ses^ to 
the shore. 

Virginia Beach has Oceana jets, 
America's best, overhead all the time. The 
Army has high speed air cushion cargo 
transport carriers, yet they're operated 
for years without comment from the 
public. 



An Army recent slipup caused a tem- 
porary public reaction, but it is unlikely 
that such an accident will happen again. 

Enter, the Navy. 

Navy air cushion vehicles are similar to 
the Army's in size, but dissimilar in fun- 
ction. Army carries cargo; Navy carries 
personnel and equipment. Both crafts are 
big, and it is said they are noth noisy. 

Whether or not Virginia Beach wants 
the mechanical monsters thunderihg near 
its coastline is not really the question. It's 
whether or not humanity can block scien- 
ce and progress. 

It can't. —G.D.G. 



Come On Back 



Did CBS mention Virginia Beach in its 
coverage of the 285 Ihiile Tour of America 
bicycling race? It's the least the network 
could have done. Virginia Beach to 
Williamsburg was the first let of the race. 

Mayor JoneF was excited and honored 
to host the race's advent in Virginia 
Beach. He said city staff members had 
worked six months on getting the 
equivalent to France's Tour De France to 
begin here. Governor Robb said he "was 
a bit skeptical*' the idea would "take 
hold." But he hopes it does and said 
Virginia Beach is the logical starting place 
for the three day race to Washington, 
D.C. Virginia Beach, he said, was in 
Virginia's "history corridor." 



Robb said there were many cities which 
wanted to host the race's start. 

Would Virginia Beach host the race 
next year? 

"I don't know specifically," Robb an- 
swered. He said it depended on public 
response. 

Virginia Beach gave the worldly 
travelers a fine send off. The magnitude 
of the celebration is clouded, however, 
because it is new to America, and no one 
yet knows what type of impact an inter- 
national bicycle race will have in this 
country. 

Virginia Beach has done its share in 
supporting the effort. It should also be 
happy to do it again— G.D.G. 



Did You Ever Wonder . . . 



•Why a 30 gallon terrarium is easier to 
care for than a 30 gallon aquarium? 

•Why more people than ever are 
chewing gum? 

•Why for no apparent reason, your 
television set vwll get odd savcy lengthy 
vertical patterns around 10 p.m.? 

•If families living on military bases can 



have pizza delivered to their homes? 
. 'Why, all of a sudden, more people are 
wearing "Virginia" sweat clothes. How 
many of them you see on the boardwalk 
actually studied there? 

•How anyone could come up with the 
idea of a holocaust museum? 



By Greg Glassner 

Balance Of Trade 



Two news items last week, though in< 
dividually rather undistinguished, com- 
bine, I think, to create a formidable pair: 
jacks or better, at any rate. 

The first reported that Marvin Mitchel- 
son, the storied "palimony" lawyer, was 
injured in a traffic accident in Southern 
California. 

His Rolls Royce, it seems, was ranmied 
by a Mercedes. 

I may be a tad more callous than some, 
but I doubt many tears were shed over this 
incident. 

In all likelihood Mitchelson will recover 
sufficiently to don an orthopedic horse- 
coiiar and totter into court where he will 
squeeze the Mercedes owner like the 
proverbial turnip. 

The second item concerns a study of the 
differences between the societies of Japan 
and the United States. 

According to management consultant 
Thomas Connellan, Japan has ten lawyers 
and 30 accountants for every 100,000 
people. 

We have 200 lawyers and 700 account- 
ants pers 100,000. 

Connellan goes on to observe that 
lawyers and accountants "do not make 
the «;onomic pie any bigger. They only 
figure out how the pie gets divided. 
Neither profession provides any added 
value to product." 



Now, while it would be foolhardy to 
propose that these facts comprise the sole 
explanation of Japan's emergence as a 
more productive economy, they do, I 
think, provide insight. 

When we toss the third branch of the 
accursed "Three Killer Bs" (Bureaucrats, 
Barristers and Beancounters) into the 
equation, it is «isier to understand what 
happened to our on(» proud and produc- 
tive society. 

Unlike Shakespeare's Dick Butcher, I 
don't propose that we "kill all the 
lawyers." 

Why some of my best friends are 
lawyers and I've even had an accountant 
prepare my tax forms the last few years. 

But there must be a more reasonable 
solution. 

Perhaps we could rwjuire all law and 
business school graduates to be fluent in 
Japanese. 

Instead of limiting imports, we could 
insist that our oriental allies accept one 
lawyer or accountant for every two 
Toyotas or 20 color televisions. We could 
exchange bureaucrats for Nikon cameras, 
(although this probably would have to be 
a 1:1 ratio.) 

In a matter of years we not only would 
have a healthy balance of trade, but 
Jaimneie society would be so muddlwl 
that we would once again be the most 
productivejjation in the world. 



Letters To 



Firefighters Want To Make Klrfflv 




ditor 



Editor: \ 

The image is of an dd guy sitting at the checid;)- 
board in front of the fire station, smddng a pipe, while 
he tells stories to a Ix^ wearing a helmet and patting a 
dahnaticn. TTiat's strictly 1910 for the Virginia Beach 
firefighter. Today, we are responsible and trained for 
nuuiy jobs, several aS which could be occupations by 
themselves. 

The Beach firefighter of today must mee't sute ai^ 
natiooally reccvoized levels of proficiency in all basic 
fireflghting skills. Along with these we must learn a 
variety of other trades. Many aim already have cdlege 
degrees and most are working toward some level of 
higher education. 

At any time we may become responsible fa* sicills in 
psychol<«y and sociology. A man that just watched his 
home and his life's work bum, requires the primer 
psychological approach. We have to recognize and be 
able to use sociological backgrounds of people 
effectively educate them in fire safety and to affect 
compliance with fire codes and ordinances. Juveniles 
must be handled with special understanding and 
techniques of education specifically designed for their 
age. ^ 

We have to be "police wise." When arriving at a 
fire, the professional firefighter is ddng much more 
than chopping down doors. Each man must lode for the 
unusual, a susfMcious or familiar face in the crowd, 
someone out c^ place or unusually nervous. Is the 
smdce or flame right for what should be burning? Are 
things missing or out of place? Finally, we must 
preserve apotential crime scene that is being destroyed 
by fire. 

Our duties include pre-fire planning, and inspec- 
tions. For these we must learn drafting skills, be able to 
read prints, and understand city, state, and naticmal 
fire codes. Those of us who deal directly with 
enforcement must know the Judicial process, prc^r 
handling of evidence, and corect courtroom deamean- 
or. These men are nd excused from the basics of 
firefighting either. 

Rescue is also in our range of respmsibility. Ail 
professional firefighters in Virginia Beash, up to the 
rank of captain, are required to maintain VHS^akstate 
Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) status, Ihd to 
certify in C.P.R. annually. When the rescue squad is 
busy or the vdunteers are nd available, we provide 
basic Ufe support. 

Nd everything we do is suitable for a T.V. action 
series. We go from glamor to grease in a big hurry. We 
paint, clean and test approumately 3,000 fire hydrants 
annually. Right behind us all the animals and elements 
do their level best to grow over and rust shut each one 
we fix up. 

We test and inventory nearly 160,000 feet of hose 
every year. Hundreds of small tods have to keep rust 
firee, shaip, and ready to go. 

Thp $100,000 trucks that we receive emergency 
vehicle driver training for are kept as clean on the 
bottom as they are on the top. The underside is a maze 
of wires, air hoses, tubes ai^d pipes, all of which harbor 
dirt that must be removed to allow quick diagnosis of 
problems or to unmask pdential trouble. 

We are responsible for giving tours, addressing civic 
groups, daily exercise programs, housecleaning, 
annual agility tests, knowing hazardous chemicals, and 
radio axidvc materials, handling electric and gas 
emergencies, and any thing else that the citizen can 
think ofand can't think (tf who else tocall. Be it a runny 
pipe or a tite that fell on house, we are the onles they 
caU. 

None (tf this is a sob story or a rash brag. It is simply 
a definition of our job by examine. We feel that we are 
highly trained and responsible pr ofessi on's working in 
a computerized public arena. 

like all |»x>fessknab, our standard of living is (rf 
great concern to us. We find tim a plumbing joint 
apprentice can expect to make $27,600 after four years. 
An electrical jdnt apprentice can expect a salary of $26, 
900 in four years. A six year postal worker can make 
$26,000. These figures, except for postal workers are 
from the locals representing these occui»tions. 

Hie median income in ^rginia BcMfa, according to 
the Chamber of Commerce is $23,456. A Virginia Beadi 
firefighter, after ten years of trainmg and service, will 
make less than $21,000 and works 56 hours a 
week— 16 hours more than normal. 

Many occupations that are similar to airs in social 
standing can expect to exceed the city medum inome 
in six years a* less. We feel our ten year level is in need 
of adjustment. It is the position (A the Virginia Beadi 



Professional Firefighters Association that the median 
income erf $23,456 should not only be reached by a 
Virginia ^ach firefighter, but it should be attainable in 
five years. Current, we do not mala it in ten. 

Walter M.Wales, 

President, 

Virginia Beach 

Professional Firefighters Association 



Lost Dog **Swallowed 



>» 



Editor: 

When you raise a dog for 15 years, then lose her, it's 
hard to live with yourself not knowing whether she is 
dead or alive. Since she is not a friendly dog, 1 caimot 
imagine why anyone would want to keep her. It cer- 
tainly is lonesome here since she has been gone because 
she tagged along behmd me every step I took and waited 
patiently every afternoon to ride in the car. 

Tish is a smaU (about 15 inch) dog with pretty, wavy 
r«l hair like an Irish settw. Her back legs tremble when 
she stands, her eyes are clouded from cataracks and she 
does not hear well. Her face, scattered with white, tells 
her age. Her feet look like a cocker spwiiel but her eyes 
are smaller and have a wisp of black hair at the edge. 

Three weeks ago, abwit dark, she got out of the car 
and I drove off not knowing that She was out. It was 
about twenty minutes before I discovered that she was 
not in the back of the station wagon. The earth seems to 
have swallowed her. Being less than a mile from home, 
she could have easily made it unless her eyes played 
tricks on her or someone picked her up. As frightened as 
she would have been at that time I don't see how anyone 
could have caught her. At her age I don't think it is 
possible that she is still roaming around somewhere 
without a lot of help, especially with all the bad weather 
we have had. There is a possibility that someone picked 
her up later and dropped her off at another location 
when they discovwed that she was an old dog. She was 
wearing dl her tags including an identification tag. 

She can't have many years left to live and I would give 
anything for her to be able to live them out here. She 
won't last long with strangers. Even the summer heat 
will yil her if she isn't kept cool. - , 

If anyone has proof of her death, I would even like to 
know that, as much as it will hurt. Until then I keep 
hoping that I will find her before it is too late. Please 
help me. I am offering a nice reward. Call 428-2914. 

Betty Etheridge 
Virginia Beach 



National Volunteer Week 

Editor: 

National Volunteer Week b April 17-23. During this 
period of recognition, on behalf of the residents and 
staff at Lynn Shores Manor, I would like to extend our 
warmest appreciation to our volunte^s. 

During these econcnmiodly stressed times, they are a 
spedal group of individuals who give the gift of them- 
selves, pa-hai» the greatest gift of all. The unselfish 
things th^ do for the residents of our nursing home 
such as one-to-one visits, {Hrovide and assist with ac- 
tivities, partidpate in the adopt a grand|»rent program, 
help wi^ dubs, and sponsor parties to mentiop a few. 
"Make it hanien" at Lynn Shores Manor. 

To aU of the, "thank you", for the many lives they 
have touched and the many special moments they have 
shared with the residents and everyone else associated 
with our facility. They are an inspiration to all of us! 

Sincerely, 

Mr. William B. Keener, Jr. 

administrator, Lynn Shores Manor, 

Virginia Beach 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

ne Virginu Beach Surt welcomes and encourages letters to the editor on any and all Virginia BMch 
issues, as well as any otlwr issiMS, questions or conarns affecting the well bdi^ of the Virginia Beach 
community. Lettws should be typed, double spaced and include the writm name, »ldress and telephone 
number. Mail letters to The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. Roscmont Road, Virginia Beadi, Va. 23452. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

13S SoHth Rosemont Road, Virgiiifai Beach, Va. 23452 Phone (MM) 486-3430 
USPS-660-140; PuhUshed Wednesdays 



GretG<Mftt^ 
Etfter 



Kichar«W.Coard,Sr. 



Within Tiifewater Area 

OneY«r-$9 

AllOtta-Ams 

OneYear-$n 

TwoY»rs-$17 

SeomI Class Pc»ta^ is paid at Lynnha^m ^ticm, 

Virginia Beach, Vi^na 

71hf »1frlMa ata<^ Am Is a BCiiikK of Tke VkiWa leach ( 



rf 



Virginal Beach Sun, April 13, 1983 3 



(•;.;._. 



t r 



Virsinia Beach Sun Bulletin Board 



Mall Mws to The Virginia Beach Sun, 139 S. Roseraonl 
Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 



h 



EDUCATIONAL 



A Scholastic Aptitude Test (S.A.T.) Prep Cour- 
se will be offered on Saturday, April 16, from 9 
a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Virginia Beach Campus of 
Tidewater Community College. 

The fee is SIS for the course which will cover 
materials such as time management techniques, 
strategies for answering questions and guessing 
and techniques for coping with anxiety. 

For registration information, contact TCC's 
Continuing Education Office. 427-3070. ext. 113. 



and development project for Virginia Beach city 
public scfaocris. Dr. Booth will speak on the future 
of pfted education in Virginia and Dr. Troutman 
will discuss the future of gifted education in 
Virginia Beach. 

The meeting is open to the public and those in- 
terested are invited to attend. 



vwc . 

Virginia Wesleyan College is hosting its annual 
Collie Day program on Saturday, April 16. The 
open house will provide an opportunity for high 
school juniors and seniors and their parents to 
visit the campus, meet members of the faculty, 
administration and student body, and discuss 
academic programs, financial aid, extra-curricular 
activities and social life at Wesleyan. 

There is no charge for the lunch or other events 
included in the open house, but students and 
parents interested in attending should make reser- 
vations by calling the college's admission office at 
(804)461-3232. 

The day-long program, which begins with 
registration in the Hofheimer Theater at 9:30 
a.m., includes tours of the campus; an address on 
"Tl*e Role of the Liberal Arts College" by Bar- 
clay Sheaks. associate professor of art; a perfor- 
mance by the VWC Chamber Singers; a picnic 
lunch; sessions with members of the faculty and 
administrative staff; and a financial aid seminar. 

Other events included in the afternoon schedule 
are 1 p.m. games by three of Wesleyan's athletic 
""tiami. The men's baseball team will host 
Methodist College from Fayetteville, N.C.; the 
women's softball team will play the women from 
Methodist College; and the men's tennis team will 
have a match with Averett College from Danville, 
Va. 



V.B.A.«.T.Mtoetliig 

A general meeting of the Virginia Beach 
Association for the Gifted and Talented will be 
held Tuesday, April 19, at 7:30 p.m. at Old 
Donation Center. 

The agenda for the evening will include a brief 
business meeting followed by a program focusing 
on the topic "Future Trends In Gifted 
Education." 

Program spiUiers mclude Dr. John Booth, state 
director of gifted education apd Dr. Benjamin 
Troutman, director of , the curriculum assessment 



RobbAtVWC 

Governor Charles &. Rdbb will be the speaker at 
Virginia Wesleyan College's fourteenth commen- 
cement on Saturday, May 14. The Reverend David 
H. Smith, minister of the Williamsburg United 
Methodsit Church, will speak at the Vesper Ser- 
vice on Friday evening, May 13. 

Approximately 140 seniors are candidates for 
graduation at the 11 a.m. ceremony Saturday 
(May 14) on the Hofheimer Library Plaza. The 
Vesper Service, scheduled for 7:15 p.m. on Friday 
(May 13), will also be held on the library plaza. 

ItorM Cltalct tclMdiilacI 

Two Horse Care Clinics will be conducted by 
the Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture/ 
Cooperative Extension Service on Saturday, April 
16 at the N.A.S. Oceana picnic area. 

The morning chnic will begin at 9:30 a.m. and 
will feature Dr. David Gregg and Dr. M. W. 
"Tookie" Myers. They will discuss "First Aid For 
Horses." 

"Hoof Care" is the subject of the afternoon 
clinic, which will start at 12:30 p.m. Tidewater 
area farriers C. E. Claussen and Keith Jaggers will 
be the sp«ikers. 

A concession and lunch stand will be operated 
by the Virginia Beach 4-H Horse Judging Club. 

Space is limited and preregistration is required. 
Phone 427-4769 to preregister. A 50« donation is 
requested to defray expenses. 

Virginia Cooperative Extension Service 
programs are open to all people regardless of race, ■ 
color, religion, sex, age, national origin, han- 
dicap, or political affiliation. 



CLASP BwtiiiMS AiMtiiig 

CLASP (Citizens Loving All Special People) 
will hold its monthly business meeting Thursday, 
April 14, at 7 p.m. Location will be at the Bow 
Crwk Recreation Center, 3427 Clubhouse Road, 
Virginia Beach. 

All voting members are highly encouraged to at- 
tend. All other interested persons are also invited^ 
to attend. 

For further information call either John Kitty at 
424-6239 or Harry Baird at 486-31 10. 



DARIIectaOfNMrt 

The Chapter meeting of the Adam Thorough- 
good DAR will be held on Thursday. April 14 at 
10 a.m. at the home of Mrs. S. P. Hadgopoulos, 
2309 Treasure Island Drive. Mrs. Oliver N. Shaw 
and Mrs. Jay C. Schumm are co-hostesses. Of- 
ficers will be elected. 

Call 481-4878 for more information. 



ARTS/ EN T 



CIVIC 



Khig'tL 

The King's Grant Garden Club will hold its 
April meeting at the home of Mrs. F. Werz on 
Thursday, April 14, at 10 a.m. For further infor- 
mation call 340-4173. 

DAY Chciiitm' 10 M««ta 

Disabled American Veterans, Chapter 20, will 
meet on Tuesday, April 19 at 7r30 p.m. at the 
chapter home. 1 17 Sykes Avenue. 

Call 499-2612 for more information . 



DaBc« Por Special P«opl« 

A dance for physically and mentally han- 
dicapped people will be held Saturday, April 16, 
from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Location will be at the Bow 
Creek Recreation Center, 3427 Clubhouse Road, 
Virginia Beach. The dance will be sponsored by 
Mr. Foy King of King Carpet Industries, the 
Virginia Beach Department of Parks and 
Recreation, and CLASP (Citizens Loving All 
Special P«)ple). 

Participation is free. Refreshments will be ser- 
ved and door prizes will be given. The latest hits 
will be played. Parents and guardians are 
welcome, however, chaperones are present at all 
times. 

Transpatation is available from your area; 
however, for planning purposes CLASP must 
know by April 7. 

Call Joy Stinnett at 499-7619 week-days from 9 
a.m. to 4 p.m. 

For further information call either John Ditty 
at 424-6239 or Harry Baird at 486-3 110. 

BridM Throvgli Tke Y«art S^t 

The Women of St. Aidan's will present a 
"Bridal Fashion Show of Brides Through The 
Years" on Thursday, May 5 at 11 a.m. at St. 
Aidan's Episcopal Church, Edinburgh Drive in 
King's Grant. 

A donation is requested and a catered reception 
will follow the show. 

The show will consist of a complete wedding 
party, as if an actual wedding was taking place. 
Instead of one bride, there will be IS of them 



CARRIER, 
HELP! 

2 Reasons 

To Buy Carrier 

Cooling NOW! 



1. Savings 

Get the year's best prices 
plus high efficiency to cut your 
cooling costs. 

2. FREE 

With the purchase of a Carrier 
Air Conditioning or Heat 
Pump. We hand you a line with 
no strings attached — a Uniden 
Model EX3000 Cordless 
Telephone Free!. 

Builders, developers not, 
eligible. 

One per customer. 

Financing Now A vailable 



SALES • SERVICE • REPAIRS 
SPECIALIZING IN HEAT PUMPS 
SHEET METAL WORK 
SERVICE CONTRACTS 



CALL TODAY FOR A FREE EVALUATION 

OF YOUR HOME 

Find out how much a Comer heat pump can save you. 

547-4444 

AMPMOR ELECTMC COI^ 

123 WayM Ave. • Gmit Bridge • Chesapeake 



wearing their dresses as they did on their wedding 
day. Dresses will date back to the late 1800's, up 
until Nov., 1982. 
For more information call 486-8162. 



•afvrday nhm Por ChlMrM 

"The Emperor's New Clothes," "Hooper- 
Bloob Highway," "Little Engine That Could" 
and "Six Penquins" will make up a film program 
for children ages three through nine on Satuday, 
April 16, at 11 a.m. at the Great Neck Area 
Library (1251 Bayne Drive) in Virginia Beach. 

This program is a part of the regularly 
scheduled Saturday morning film programs of- 
fered during the school year and will last ap- 
proximately 55 minutes. 

Children and parents can learn more about the 
movie program by calling the library at 481-6094. 



The Virginia Beach Maritime Historical 
Museum has announced its spring opening of 
recent original paintings by Herb Jones. 

The opening will take place on Saturday, April 
16 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the museum, 24th 
Strett and Atlantic Avenue. The show will con- 
tinue through April 30. Hours are Tuesdays 
through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays, 
noon to 5 p . m . ; and closed on Mondays . 

For more information call Martha Price at 422- 
1587. 



SPECIAL EVENTS 





^To 

The 35th Annual Virginia Public Relations 
Conference will be held in Virginia Beach begin- 
ning on Sunday, April 18 and running througlfe-^ 
Tuesday, April 19, at the Sheraton Beach Inn. 

Featured guests include Frank Purdue and Pat 
Robertson. 

Call 804-281-1317 for more information. 

AroYmiPrnKNiRtT 

The American Red Cross will offer April classes 
in Preparation for Parenthood/Lamaze in 
Virginia Beach. 

Participants may learn anatomy and 
physiology, pre-natal care, nutrition, labor and 
delivery using the Lamaze method, and infant care 
to include feeding, diapering, bathing and tips on 
parenting. 

Free gift packs will be given to all participants. 

For pre-registration and more information on 
dates, times and locations call Rhonda Bailey at 
499-2311. 



ActlvltiM At Prtoad't School 

The Quaker Friend's School, 1537 Laskin 
Road, will present a day of family activities on 
Saturday, April 23 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Participants should come in casual clothes and 
bring a sack picnic lunch. Beverages and dessert 
will be provided by the host group, the Tidewater 
Peace Center. 

Call 425-5414 for more information. 



Leukemia Benefit Set 

Rudy and Kelly's hair stylisU will hold a cut-a- 
thon to benefit the Leukemia Society of America. 
It will take place on Monday, April 19, from 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. at Pembroke Mall. HaircuU will be 
given for $8 each. 

All of the proceeds will go to the Virginia Chap- 
ter of the Leukemia Society of America for 
Research, patient-aid, and public and professional 
education. Get a new look for the spring and sup- 
port the Leukemia Society. 

For more information, call 838-9351 . 



Virginia Beach Mayor Louis R. Jones had proclaimed 
April 14 through 17 as "Knights of Columbus Days for 
the Retard«l." The organization will again sell Tootsie 
Rolls to raise funds, and local residents are asked to par- 
ticipate in this campaign. 




SUPERIOR 
BUILDERS 



Specializing in Porch 

Enclosures & Florida Rooms 

also 

•Costom Room Additions 

•Room Addition Sheib 

•Bathroom Remodeling •Garages 

•Vinyl & Aliiminnm Siding 

•Muonry Ftreplace 'Solar & Glass Rooms 

•All Types Concrete Work •Termite Damage 

•Mobtnre Control 

OVER 20 YRS. EXPERIENCE & STA TE REG. 



FREE ESTIMATES 422-1^00 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, April 13, 1983 



Virslnia Beach City Council sy L**cihNi 

Beach Council Actions 



^ 



On Chesapeake Bay 




Crackdown On Beach Parties 



Job! A. Baaa 
Mackwatcr 



Nbmjt a. Cracch 
At-Lw|c 



Barbara M. Haaiajr 
Paigo 



HaraMIMKbobcr 
Al-Lar|t 



.JackJcBBiii|( 
Lyaakavca 



LoiitaR.JeaM 
BayMc 





Robert G.JoMt 
Al-Largc 



W. H. Ulcbta, in 
Vfa^oiaBcacb 



8.McC3anB 
PitaCMpAiM 



J.HwtfyMcCoy.lr. 

KCBUMVtHc 



McyeraObcnidorf 
Al-Large 



* Informal Session 

12:30 p.m. 

aty Maaapr Thomas H. MueMenbeek is dirc^ed to brias 
back breakdown of Atlantic Avenue Beautiflcation Plan and 
alternatiyes for funding. 



propoted 



Vice Mayor Barbara Henky recommends that Council 
adhere stri^ to Virginia Code requiring IRS tax exempt 
status for organizations apidying for bingo permits. 

if Executive Session 

1:30 p.m. 

if Formal Session 

2 p.m. 



City Planning EHrector Robert Scott presents 
drainage policy for the south end of the dty. 



•Resolution of appreciation to Scott Sterling in recognition 
of his contributions to the city, presented by Councihnui W. 
H. Kitchin III on behalf of Mayor Louis R. Jones. Sterling il 
owna of the Princess Anne Inn and a member of a number of 
dvic organizations. 

•Resolution in recognition of Cleta Liverman, general 
registrar who retired Jan. 31 of this year. She bad beai 
registrar since Jan. 1, 1976. was first employed in 1971 as^ 
secretary to the General Registrar and Elecoral Board; on Nov. 
16 she accepted a position as secretary with the Circuit Court 
Judges. 

•Resolution in recognition of Mrs. Marvin L. (Lettie) Doxier 
who swved as a member of the Public Library Board frwn 
1967 through March 1983. Presentation made by Coundlmu 
John A. Baum, a neighbor. 



Code of the Gty of Virginia Beach, Virginia, pertaining to 
Sewn System Impact Fees, and Section 37-8 (a) pertaining to 
Water System Impact Fees. Approved 104, McCoy absent. 

•Ordinance, on first reading, to accept grants totaling 
S34,8S4 from the Virginia Department of Transportation 
Safety and to appropriate these funds. Approved 10-9, McCoy 
absent. 

•Ordinance to transfer capital project funds of $103,103 to 
eliminate the deficit and provide for additional computer soft- 
ware in Capital Project 2-412 Virginia Beach Boulevard - Phase 
I (Removed from consent agenda) Approved 1 1-0. 

•EncroachmenU of S and S Enterprises: A. Ordinance to 
authorize a temporary encroachment into a portion of the 
right-of-way of a city IS' alley adjacent to those properties 
referred to as 800 through 816 Surfside Avenue (Lots 8, 9 and 
10, Block 13, Croatan Beach) to S & S Enterprises, its heirs, 
assigns and successors in title. Approved 10-0, McCoy absent. 
B. Ordinance to authorize a temporary encroachment into a 
portion of the right-of-way of a city 13' alley adjacent to those 
propolies referred to as 812 and 816 Surfside Avenue (LoU 6 
and 7, Bkxk 13, Croatan Beach) to S A S Enterprises, iu heirs. 
assigns and successors in title. Approved 10-0, McCoy absent. 

•Ordinance appointing viewers in the petition of Bruce B. 
Mills for the closure of a portion of Dutch Street (Kempsville 
Bwough). Approved 10-0, McCoy absent. 

•Low bid of Southern National Leasing Corporation for the 
lease/purchase of electronic voting equipment totalling 
S13S,180. Southern National Leasing Corporation offers ten 
semi-annual payments in arrears at an annual interest rate of 
9.93%. Semi<«nnual payments would be approximately 
$20,460.17. Authorize the City Manager to enter into the' 
necessary agreements for the implementation of the project. 
Approved 10-0, McCoy absent. 

•Bingo Permit: Plaza Dance, Figure and Speed Roller 
Skating Club. (This matter was deferred for two weeks on 
March 28, 1983). (Removed from consent agenda) Approved 
11-0. 



if Planning 



if Resolutions 



•Resolution authorizing the City Mana^ to eata into a 
ctmtract for an independent audit of the Oty of Virginia Beach 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1983. (This matter was 
deferred for one week on March 28, 1M3 and for an addltionid 
week on AprU 4. 1983) Deferred one week; 8-3; Heidey, Kit- 
chra, Obcmdorf dissenting. 

•Resolution discontinuing the High Constable's office cm 
June 30, 1983 and that as of July 1 , 1983, the Qty Coundl an- 
ticipates the General Assembly will provide for the services that 
are now being provided to the judicial system and the puMic by 
the High ConsUble's Office. The City Manager is directed to 
furnish the City Council, during the current budget review 
process, with a listing of City funds provided to the Con- 
stitutional officers of the City. Approved 1 1-0. 

•Resolution strongly urging the U.S. Navy not to establUi 
the LCAC (Landing Craft Air Cushion) base in Virginia Beach 
and to conduct iu training at military installatioDS outside 
Virginia Beach so as not to Aversely impact the health, safety, 
and general welfare of the citizens of and visitors to our City. 
Deferred until information fully developed. 11-0. 

•Resolution authorizing Resort SateUite TV. at the request 
of Agnes Mullen, to install a dish fw the exdudve use of Prin- 
cess Anne Inc., Approved 10-1, Oeech abaem. 

• Consent Agenda 

•Resolution in recognition of Scott Stoling for his con- 
tributions to the city. Approved 1(W), McCoy absoit. 

•Resolution in Re«)gnition of Clett Livmnan who served u 
General R^trar from January 1, 1976 until January 31. 1983. 
>^>fm>vedll-0. 

•Resolution of Appreciation to Mrs. Marvin L. (Lettie 
Dozier who served as a member of the Public Library Board 
from 1967 through March 1983. Approved 100, McCoy tb- 
sent. 

•Resolution authorizing the mli^raient of a nonconfor- 
ming use located at the southwest comer of 18th Street and 
MediterraneanrAvenue as per request of Ronald S. toay, of 
BaUwin and Gregg, Ltd., on behalf of Kolbe ConqMny. 
(Removal from consent agenda) Approved 1 1 -0. 

•Ordinance to Amend and Re«wdain Section 2M (a) of^ 



•Application of Shore Drive Associates for a conditional use 
pmnit for mini-warehouses on a 3.331-a9re parcel located 
along the south side of Shore Drive, east of Diamond Springs 
Road (Bayside Borough). Letter from the City Manager tran- 
smits the recommendation of the Planning commiuion for ap- 
proval. An>roved 11-0. 

•Application of Thrift Car Cace. Inc. for a conditional use. 
pennit for automobile and small engine repairs on a 22,300 
square foot parcel located at the southeast comer of Haygood 
Road and Aragona Boulevard (Bayside Borough). Letter from 
the Qty Manager transmits die recommendation of the Plan- 
ning Comndsnon for approval. Approved 11-0. 

•Application of Patrick L. Standing for a conditional \ae 
pennit for three duplexes on a 16,161.7-square foot parcel 
located at the southeast intersection of Lakewood Circle and 
Meditcnanean Avenue (Virginia Beach Borough). Letter from 
the aty Manager transmiu the recommendation of the PUm- 
aii^Commissioa for approval.Approved 7-4,Henley, Kitchin, 
McClaoan, Oberadorf dissenting. 

•Ordinance closing, vacating and discontinuing a portion of 
Okl Viiiinia Beach Boulevard (Lynnhaven Borough) in the 
petition of Jack and Dorcas Helfant. Letter from the City 
Manago' transmits the recommendation for final approval as 
on June 21, 1983, Council approved this closure. Approved 10- 
0. McCoy absot. 

•Application of Newsome Farm Associates for a variance to 
Section 4.4(b) of the Subdivision Ordinance which requires 
See COUNCIL, Page 3 



By Lee Cahill 
Sun CouiKil Reporter 

hfight revelers on the 
Chesapeake Bay beaches 
will find little to revel 
about this summer with- 
out food, drink and bon- 
fires. 

That's the intent of 
ordnances that will make 
it unlawful to have food or 
drink or to light fires on 
the beach between 6 p.m. 
and 9 a.m. Areas included 
in the ban are those lying 
between Whaler Court on 
the east and Kleen Street 
on the west. 

If the light's good 
enough, however, they 
-an throw frisbees or play 
ball. 

Although the high-rise 
Westminster-Canterbury, 
home for the elderly, has 
been Ojpen only one year - 
and one summer ~ that 
summer was enough, 
apparently, to send the 
residents to Virginia 
Beach Gty Council for 
relief. A busload from the 
home came to Council 
Monday afternoon to sup- 
port the (vdinances. 

Residents of the home 
and other area residents 
have complained about 
the ndse from beach par- 
ties which attract large 
crowds. They said the 
pe(q>le are often abusive 
and the ndse is such that 
it is difficult to sleep 
nights. 

All of the apartments in 
the Presbyterian-Eiisco- 
palian establishment face 
the beach. 

Even with the wdi- 
nances, Councilman W.H. 
Kitchin III, who has had 
longer experience with 
the same problems on the 
ocean front, cautioned the 
residents not to expect too 
much. He cited the diffi- 
culty of having violators 
prosecuted. 

Actually what started 
out as a ban-everything- 
on-the-beach type of 
thing, has been watered 
down to two OTdinances, 
one prdiibiting bonfires 
on the beach and the other 
bamiirig food and drink on 
the beach between 6 p.m. 
and 9 a.m. 

Cmmcil threw oat a 
third ordinance banning 
frisbees and ball games 
on the beach because 
these activities do not 
seem to bother the resi- 
dents. Such an ordinance 
is in effect along the 
crowded beach strip on 
the oceanfront. 

Previously a proposal to 
ban busloads of beach- 
goers at the beach also 
was considered. This pro- 



Jones 
Announces 

Virginia Beach City 
Councilman Robert G.I 
Jones has aimounced his' 
8th Senate District 
Democratic candidacy. 

He opposes the 
Riq)ublican incumbent A. 
Joseph Canada. Jr., who 
has served in Uie state 
senate in 1971. 



COL. JOSEPH (JOE) EXUM - AUCTIONEER 



JOE EXUM AUCTION CO. 

550 FIRST COLONIAL RD. 
VA BEACH. VA 23451 




Phone 422-6684 
422-4949 



AUCTIONS - APPRAISALS 
SALES -PROMOTIONS 




MICHAEL F. 
FASANARO, JR. 

AMoi^ey 
AtL«w 

#1-6121 

5 Kot» Exet utive Center 
SUITE 220 

Norf<A, Va. 23502 



PRINTING 

Special Business Package 

*59.95* 

1,000 Letterhead 

SlallonrytV^zll 

1,000 Business Envelopes 



Black ink on white 20 lb. Bond 
Frtee indndes negatives, plate, 
typesetting and composition 

CALL BRAD AT 4864)300 




IRML 



2439 Ocoacc Ave. 

Vh|laiaaaKk 

Vta|iila* 23454 




Ceiitriuif 

itaiaiiliM- 

t v'H' . !^MiN *M_1 MIM R*i, IN !M( us f?>4 4M3Mliftl 

OFFICIAL MULTIVITAMIN OF THE 1984 WINTER OLYMPICS. 



special 
offer 

'7.39 

with this 
ad 



BONUS OFFER 

30 FREE 
WTTHIOO 



<£5 



E 



1 



Cntfiiun 



INGRAM PHARMACY 

207 25th Street 
VIRGINIA BEACH. VIRW«A 23451 



posal never got off the 
grmnd. 

The ordinance banning 
food and drink originally 
had no time limit. Hiis 
upset Council members 
concerned about the gen- 
eral public, the mothers 
with children who custom- 
arily carry some food and 
drink'with them. 

Cbuncilwoman Reba 
McQanan made the sug- 
gestion that the ban be 
limited to the night hours 
when the problenu seem 
to occur and Council sup- 
ported her suggestion by 
a vote of 10-1 . Councilman 
Robert G. Jones said the 
entire ordinance should 
be eliminated because he 
couldn't see the differ- 
ence between the beach at 
42nd street and the beach 
on Oiesapeake Bay. He 
dissented. 

Council is expected to 
approve the «-dinance as 
amended next Monday 
aftemooi. 



The fire ban was 
approved unanimojsly. 

The matter had been 
brought before Council 
originally by Councilman 
Jack Jennings Jr. 

Dr. Daniel Dickerson, a 
resident of the area and 
representing Westmin- 
ster-Canterbury, sup- 
ported the«ordinances. 

He said that the police 
have been unable to con- 
trol the situation, that the 
crowds are "too large, too 
loud and too drunk." He 
added that fires seem to 
be important to promote 
the level of partying. He 
said the area was residen- 
tial. 

Councilwoman Nancy 
Qreech wanted to know 
what made it so different 
from North Virginia Beach 
which also is a residential 
area. 

Dickerson said the fish- 
ing pier made the differ- 
ence and the greater 



amount of business zon- 
ing. 

McClanan said that 
since the biggeSt pro- 
blems are at night with 
parties, hcHirs should be 
included in the o-dinance 
so that the problem of the 
residents would be 
solved, but public access 
could be continued during 
. the day. 

Kitchin said that the 
problem with choosing 
hours is that the situation 
becomes ludicrous when 
police officerr have to 
check the code book to see 
whether they can lock up 
vidators. 

See CRACKDOWN, Page 6 



Energy 
Lecture 



A free lecture on solar 
energy will be ^ven on 
April 13 at 7:30 p.m. at 
Oceanfront Area Library, 
428-4113. 





DELUXE 21-INCH 
MOWERS 

Three models — push- 
type; self-propelled; 
and electric-start self- 
propelled. Push-type 
has SVz-hp engine, 
self-propel leds have 
4-hp engines and 
rear-wheel gear drive. 
Optional 2V2-bushel 
rea, bagger Qut qUlCk BOd 

^P .. easy with a 

Riding Mower ^^^ q^^ 

The 68 Rider has an ^_j ly^ . 

enclosed engine for TlllTimer / Cager 

quiet ride; shift-on-the 





go 5-speetf 

transmission. Recoil or 
electric start. 30- or 
34-inch cutting width. 
Optional rear bagger 
lor 30-inch mower. 

10-to16-hp 
Ti'actors 



COME IN AND CHECK 
OUT OUR COMPLETE 
LINE OF JOHN DEERE 
PRODUCTS. 

•Financing Available 

•Computerized Parts 
Department 



Choose from 10, 12. 14, 
and 16 hp. Built-in 
headlights. 
Variable-speed drive. 
Color-coded controls. 
Wide range of imple- 
ments available. Test 
drive a 200 Series soon. 



•Complete Service 
Facilities. 

CHESAPEAKE RENT 

ALL, INC. 
1000 Great Bridge Blvd. 

(Inst off 164 at Rl. 104) 

547-9244 



'^[^ NotNngRur^ 
^^ UkaaDeere' 




♦ 




THE 

DISABLED 

AMEMCAN VETERANS 

NEED YOUR HELP! 



WE NEED: CLOTHING, 

Mens, Women's and Children's. 
Also, Books • Toys • Linens • Bedding 
' • Housewares and China. 



CALL 461-4938 



FAST 



AndDt^ndahU, 
Pick Up Service 



WE CAN USE PICTURES, TABLES, CHAIRS, 
LAMPS AND MUCH MORE. 



TAX DEDUCTIBLE 

Please CaU 461-4938 
Today—Thank You. 



1 



Today... inanKiou. ^ v 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 13, 1983 5 



Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 



i 




Crafts Not Allowed Near Public Shore 



Continued frewn Page I 

maritime restricticMis on them ddng that. But it was 
very noisy when they did it and it attracted an awful lot 
of attention. We grt an awful of lot of complaints from 
our neighbors." 



<(i 



'Because there were no restrictions, 
they could go anywhere any other boat 
could go until we told them they 
couldn't. We established a policy that 
the boats will operate out of Fort Story, 
straight out to sea, straight north for 
one mile before they turn either in a 
direction towards Lynnhaven or towar- 
ds Virginia Beach." - Blewster 



Without being specific, Blewster said the operators 
"were dealt with" for taking liberties with the crafts. 

"First thing we did was put out a pdicy that they 
could not do that," Blewster explained. "Because there 
were no restrictions, they could go anywhere any other 
boat could go until we tdd them they couldn't. We 
established a oolicv that the boats will operate out bf 

r "» 

1 Old Fashioned 

I BENT WOOD HAT& CO A T RACK 

I (Limited Offer) 




487-1706 

Attractive hang-up for hats, coats and scarfs. Real steamed 
» hardwood stained with rich antique finish. 

I Measures 19'/«"x7"x4" Only $8.00 

,^, J Satisfaction Guaranteed 

f Sorry no COD 's. Send check or mon ey order 

I to: JACQUELYN'S GIFTS 

' P.O. Box 2369, Portsmouth V«., 23702 

I Va. Residents add 41^0 sales tax. 

I Name . ■ — ' 

' Address. 

City, State, Zip 



-(2) 






Fort Story, straight out to sea. straight north for one 
mile before they turn either in a direction towards 
Lynnhaven or towards Virginia Beach." 

The Army knows that the air cushion cargo transport 
crafts are noisy and i<xk inuncdiate action after the 
incidents to insure such wanderings dirt't happen 
again. 

"We are aware that they arc noisy craft and it was 
very ill advised, in my opinion, to take them down 
there." Blewster said. "As soon as we heard about it 
we put a stop to it." 

Blewster said there is a five-naUe precautionary area, 
in the shape of an arc, around Fort Story. Only mUitary 
crafts are supposed to be in this area, but Blewster dwl 
they sometimes let some Fishing and crabbing boaU in. 

The question of danger is raised while the lACV-30's 
are out at sea. Critics say they pose a potential danger 
toother boaters. Blewster counters by noting the crafts 
navigations systems. ^, 

"There's an operator plus a radar navigator, ne 
said, "and that navigations system is capable of even 
picking up a school of surfacing porpoises, ft's a very 
sensitive systei»> It has several ranges and the crafts 
have the abiUty to stop in about two boat lengths from 
40 mUes per hqjir. They stop very quick." 

The Army's LCVD-30's are used exclusively for cargo 
transport while the Navy's LCACs are personnel and 
equipment carriers. They are both designed for use 
during wartime, to assist areas which have no ports. 
TTie crafts, which ride on a four-foot cushion of air, an 
operate in all temperatures and over almost any terrain. 
The LCVD-30, which Is smaller than the LCAC, is 
said to be the ndser 0/ the two because its 
nine-foot-wide propeller blades are not shrouded, as 
are the LCAC'sU' 9"blades. 

Just how noisy are the LCVD-30's? 
"My guess would be," Blewster said, "of course a 
lot depends on how the wind is blowing, but Vta sure 
you can hear them five miles away. I don't doubt it for a 
minute that you can hear it that far away." 

"If you were to ask me if aie of them was operating 
today," Blewster, who lives on base right beside the 
ocean, said, "I'd have to stop and listen. But if one's 
passing right out in front of my house, of course I hear 
it. And if I'm outside it's very noisy, ft doesn't make me 
grab my ears or anything, but I'm certainly aware it s 

there." . ^ .u • 

But the question is, at what pomt does the noise 

become an irritation? ..^ j 

"It wouldn't be an irritation over 1,000 yards out at 
aU to me," Blewster said, "but that's not to say that it 
might not be to someone else." ^_^ 

Fort Story, except for coordinating trammg efforts, 
will have no imput into where the Navy sUtions lU fleet. 
"We were not required or even asked to make any 
imput into it," Blewster said. "We were asked to mate 
imput into it," Blewster said. "We were asked to mate 
imput into whether or not it (the fleet) should be 






ALACV^alFortSlofy 



sutioncd at Fort Story. As a result of the imput that we 
put into there, the decision was made that it would not 
be based at Fort Story." 

Blewster said the Navy's effcMts will not enhance Fort 
Story's operatifflis. . 

"No. Not at all," he said, "ft will use training spwe 
that we will probably need at some time in the ftiture. ft 
would not detract in any other way. But there's no way 
it can enhance our operations." 

Navy officials say they need the base within 50 miles 
of Little Creek to utilize everything it builds there. 

Council Actions 

Continued from Page 4 

that lot dimensions conform to the Comprehen»ive Zoning Or- 
dinance. Applicant wishes to subdivide a l.406-acre parcel 
located at the northwest corner of Connie Ijuie and Uwrence 
Drive into six parcels, two of which will be in a "ftag lot" con- 
figuration (Bayside Borough). Utter from the City Manager 
transmits the recommendation of iht Planning Commisfion for 
denial. Denied 9-2, McClanan, McCoy dissenting. 

•Application of Dr. Robert W. Waddell. Truitee for 
Virginia Beach Orthopedic Associates Employee Profit 
Sharing Plan, for a change of zoning from B-2 Community- 
Business District to A-3 Apartment District on a 2.476-acre 
parcel located on the north side of Witchduck Road, southwest 
of Ferry Plantation Road (Bayside Borough). Letter from the 
City Manager transmits the recommendation of the Planning 
Commission for approval. Approved 1 1-0. 

•Application of Margaret R. Mills and Garphine E. imiUi 
for a change of zoning from R-6 Residential District to A- 1 
Apartment District on a five-acre parcel located east of 
Uwrence Drive, north of Daniel Smith Road (Bayside 
Borough). Letter from the City Manager transmits the recom- 
mendation of the Planning commission for denial. Approved 
6-5, Creech, Henley, Kitchin, McClanan, Oberndorf dissen- 
ting. 



ffiNNlES 

KmTOUR 
THOUGHTS 



' AkxHjdIsfwcocaycanbertchly 
rewaK*iQ. It can mate you and Ihe per- 
son you called feel like a frtlUon dolkars. 
And it can do that- for pennies. 

Vbu can save up to 50% c^ rec^jkar 
ctaytime rotes when you dial direct any- 
where in the continental U.S. -witlxxit 
opefokx asslstance-on v^^eekends or 
weekdays after 5:(D0 pm. 

Cert a Wend. Sure, ycxj'll spend a few 
pennies. But, (or what if s worth, what you'M 
buyispric^ss. 




CCMUL 



MMIUIHIH W MipMRB 

SyMm 



• Ordinan 




•Ordinance to amendUnd reordah Section 6-3 of the Code 
of the City of Virginia Bfcach wftaming to Playing Ball, tmng 
frisbees. etc. on the beach oBihe Chesapeake Bay. Denied 10- 
l. R.Jones dissenting. 

•Direction to City Attorney Dale Bimson to return next weeK 
with ordinance pertaining to prohibiting food or drink on 
beach on Chesapeake Bay after 6 p.m. and before 9 a.m. 
during the summer months. Approved 1 1 -0. _ 

•Ordinance to amend and reordain Section 12-3 of the Code 
of the City of "irginia Beach pertaining to fires on the beaches 
on the Chesapeake Bay. Approved 1 l-O. 



• Old Business 

Arts aiicl NuiiiaMitl«t 



Con- 



Councilman John A. Baum criticizes method in which Art* 
and Humanities Commission handled the Virgima Orchestra 
Group-Pops Orchestra controversy. 

i^ Executive Session 

7 p.m. '• 

Followed by adjournment. 




Get Smart 
Go Short! 

withREAUSTiC _^^^ 
GUYS N DOLLS^^ ^22'® 

NO SET STYTJNG HOT PBIM 



iwdycui £••• 

Ten Cat •»••• 

lactadc* tlMaipae, cat mi fMsh. 

Appointmenc not ahA/ays neaH»y. 

Use your Sears charge card. 



Sale Ends April 30th 

Shears 

atSears 



424-931t 
2a« fleer 



HAIR SALON 



VlTftalB 

4rr-93M 
in 



At Fort Story, three different interests use the 
lACV-30*s day and night all during the year: the Bell 
Aircraft Corp., out oC Fort Wwth, TX, which builds the 
crafts M Fort Story; the U.S. Army Transportation 
School; where the LACV-30 pilots ate trained: and Fort 
Story's 11th BiUalion. who trains the pilots on how to 
use the cralls. 

Written canments on the landing crafts will be 
accepted through Monday, April 25, by assistant to the 
city manager, David Grochmal. 



CouncU 
Honors 
Napolitano 

A citizen of Virginia 
Beach for the past 28 
years, Fred Napolitano 
recently received a reso- 
lution of recognitioi by 
Mayor Louis R. Jones for 
his service to the city and 
his state and national 
recognitioo. 

Napolitano is immedi- 
ate past president of the 
National Associatiai of 
Home Builders. In his 
official capacity, he has 
visited all SO states as well 
as Japan, Australia, 
China, Canada, Mexico, 
England, Germany, Fin- 
land, Sweden and France, 
promoting Virginia Beach 
wherever he went. 

The resdution states 
that many of his suggest- 
ed remedies are now 
being implemented for 
the survival of the housing 
industry. 

Although the resulution 
was signed by the major 
and approved by Council, 
the actual presentation 
was made by Council- 
woman Nancy Creech, a 
personal friend and busi- 
ness associate of Napdi- 
tano. 




He is director of Birth- 
right, Inc., the Virginia 
Beach Beautification 
CommissicMi; was presi- 
dent in 1976 of the Vir- 
ginia Beach Chamber of 
Commerce; is founder and 
hcmorary bc^rd member 
of Big Brothers; past 
member, past president 
and founder of the Nep- 
tune Festival; active past 
committee chaiman of the 
United Communities 
Fund, and past member of 
the Ciovernor's Advisory 
Legislative Committee; 
was 1977 builder of the 
Year; King Neptune IV in 
1975 and Outstanding 
Builder of the Year in 
1%3 recipient of the Bro- 
therhood citation in 1974 
of the National Confer- 
ence of Christians and 
Jews, and Outstanding 
Service Award, Lions 
Qub in 1974. 



^ 



BUSINESS MAN'S SPECIAL 



PRINTING 



ONE MONTH ONLY! 



59. 



95 

•TOTAL PRICE 



1,000 Letterhead 

Ob 20 lb. Bond, White 

1,000 Envelopes 

#10Biisiiicss,WUtc 

Black Ink 



NO CHARGE FOR 



• Ncsttivcs 
• Plates 



•Typesetting 
• ComporitioD 



1 



CALL BRAD 48(M>300 




iRTS MAIUNO, LTD 



2439 OcoMC Ave. 
Vto^irfai 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, April 13. 1983 

Beach 

Designers 

Promoted 



Laszlo Aranyi, AIA, 
president of The Design 
Ccdlaborative,. a Virginia 
Beach Architectural firm, 
has announced the promo- 
tioi of two registered 
architects to the position 
of associate. 

Edward G. Lazaroa, 
AIA, holds a Bachelor oi 
Architecture from Princ- 
ton University and a Mas- 
ter of Architecture from 
George Washington 
University. He is the 
recipient of a first place 
award in the Virginia 
State Passive Solar Com- 
petition in multi-family 
housing design. He was 
appdnted to the Virginia 
State Office of Emergency 
and Energy Serviws to 
serve as sdar consultant 
for eastern Virginia. 

A native of Norfolk, 
Lazaron is active in the 
Tidewater Solar Energy 
Association and lectures 
frequently on energy con- 
servation and architec- 
tural innovation. He is an 
instructor at CMd Domin- 
ion University in passive 
sdar home design. 

C. Michael Henry grad- 
uated from Auburn Uni- 
versity with degrees in 
architecture and environ- 
mental design. A native oi 
Newport News, Henry has 
submitted the design for 
his own new passive solar 
home on the Peninsula to 




Henry 

"Sdar Age Magazine" 
far their national award 
competition. 

Henry was a consultant 
to the American Wood 
Council for their Energy 
'80 Solar Promotional 
Homes project and was 
presented with AWCs 
"Design Fw Better Liv- 
ing" Award in 1980. 



♦'Living Waters" Set 



The Virginia Dare Soil 
and Water Conservation 
District will join the 
nationwide celebration of 
Soil Stewardship Week 
May 8-lS. 1M3, according 
tb Cteiraukn R. Eventtt 
Sawyer. The theme of this 
year's celebration is 



"Living Waters." The 
National Association of 
Conservation Districts has 
sponsored Soil Stewar- 
dship Week since 1933 in 
cooperation with nearly 
3.000 soil and vi^ater con- 
servation districts. 



National Library 
Week Announced 

rational library Week will be celebrated throughout 
the United States and in Virginia Beach during the 
week of April 18 - 23, 1983. Its purpose is to recognize 
the vital rdc that libraries of every kind play in our 
emotional and intellect lives. 

TTie Virginia Beach Public library will recognize 
Iifational library Week in a unique festival of the 
contemporary arts. The festival will be a part of the 
"Year of Celebrations", the official recognition for the 
twentieth anniversary of the merger of Virginia Beadi 
and Princess Anne County, 

The festival will acknowledge the youthfutoess at 
Virginia Beach in a sunburst of pr(«rams featuring 
local artists describing and demonstrating their most 
contempwary work. The Virginia Stage Company 
Interns, Doug PiUey, Rita Rawls, KeUy Freas, B.J. 
Leiderman, Qirlton Abbortt and Ed Carson, Joyce 
Bailey, Fay Zetlin and the Moving Company - Dance 
Now! wUl all participate in the festival. Their programs 
will bring poetry, theater, music, photography, ar- 
chitecture, computer art, puppets, storytimra, and 
fiber art to Virginia Beach for five exciting days. The 
week will be fresh, intensive and alive, all the elements 
of an exciting birthday cclebratiaiof the arts and of the 
City of Virginia Beach, and an acknowledgement of the 
unique cultural rde of the Virginia Beach Public 
library. 

All festival events will be staged withm the five area 
libraries in Virginia Beach. They are being funded by a 
grant from the Friends of the Virginia Beach Public 
Library and have been planned with the direction of 
Cultural Experiences Unlimited. 

The American Library Association has chosen "GO 
FOR rr* as the guiding theme of this year's National 
Library Week. It implies that a more active exploration 
of library resources is a facet of the more assertive 
pers<Mial lifestyle of the 1980's. 

The public library is one aspect of the cultural life of 
any community. Its role as a cultural agency is to be a 
place people can first learn about or experience the 
arts. It is a point of beginning for new audiences and 
expanded audiences for the arts in every community. 
The National Library Week festival of the arts in 
Virginia Beach is a unique expression of this role. 

Upcoming activities include: 

Children's Tbcater 

The Virginia Stage Company Interns will present 
"Mazel and Shlimazel", a Yiddish folk tale by Isaac 
Bashevis Singer, on Monday, April 18, at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Ocean front Area Library in Virginia Beach. The 
play for children begins the National Library Week 
cultural festival. 
^ "Mazel and "Schlimazel" is a rags- to-riches story 
that traces the rise of a poor Russian boy named Tam 
fran peasant to Prince Conswt. Spirits of good and ill 
fortune alternately boost and deflate the chances of 
Tam until good triumphs and Tam lives happily 
everafter. 

Reservations foe this heartwarming play may be 
made by calling the Ocean front Area library at 
428-4113. ' '5« 



Beach Party Crackdown 



1 



we're admitting is we 
can't keep law and order 
unless we prohibit. Most 
of the public simply aren't 
gang to get to go to the 
beach." They said the 
private sector hasn't done 
so well by putting units on 
the beach so that it be- 
comes a private beach. 
Drinking, he added, 
doesn't mean alcohd. 

Councilwoman Nancy 
Creech said she agreed 
with Baum. She said she 
was concerned about the 
people who don't live on 
the beachfrcmt. She said 
the city aheady has laws 
cm alcohd and litter. She 
said she would have a pro- 



continued from Page 4 

He said he would sup- 
port the cx-dinances, but 
they will create more frus- 
trating situations. He said 
that oncx an ordinance is 
passed, people expect no 
drinking in public, no 
frisbees. "It's not going 
to be that way. Go to court 
to see what's going on 
with these laws we pass. 
You may end up more 
frustrated." 

Councihnan 3dtm A. 
Baum said he was pre- 
pared not to vote for any 
of this. It would be giving 
up the dtizens' rights to 
use the beach. "What 

BIEDay 

Continued from Page I 

displays will be amducted from 2:30 to 3:13 p.m. A 
formal proaram, including remarks from Chamber of 
Commerce. President Bob Fentress, public school 
administrator Gariand Jackson, and Mrs. George Bush, 
will take place from 3:13 to 4:30 p.m. 

The day is sponsored by the Virginia Beach Chamber 
of Conunerce Education Qsmmittee; the Virginia Beach 
Education Assodation Task Force G^IE; and the 
Virginia Beach Public Schod Administration. 

Businesses which participate in the program will be 
given a list of suggested topics for discussion while the 
teachers and counselors are visiting. 

The press will question Mrs. Bush during a question 
and answer period fdlowing her talk. Attendance at the 
formal program is by invitation only. 



blem telling a mother in 
Kempsville that she can't 
go to the beach with her 
child (because she would 
be prdiibited from taking 
food or drink). 

Councihnan J. Henry 
McCoy Jr. said that "We 
do have civilian rights," 
and that the laws go so far 
they get ridiculous. 

fotmtx U.S. Congress- 
man Pwter Hardy, a 
resident of Westminster- 
Canterbury, said that the 
prd)lems are generally at 
night and the noise seenas 
to be accented around 
fires. 

Q-eech suggested los- 
ing into better control 



during n^httime hours. 
Unwood Robinson said 

the pe(vle ^^ "°'sy» 
rowdy, insdent, and that 
ahhough the pdice have 
been called, they have 
said they had no author- 
ity. 



Mrs. E.C. Nelson said 
she would love to see 
mothers and children. "I 
hate to spdl that, but 
loathe being awal»ned at 
night." 

Jones said he had pro- 
blems with (insistency, 
that the ordinances were 
pieced together like a 
patchwork quilt. 



Businesses participating in the day are: 
Ayera tasalatlog And Sap^ Co., Inc.; Bank «w 
Vlrgliila Beicb; Bayihk Hoapitiri; ■ro*?-^-S«; 
hone Inc.; CftP TekphoM Co. of VA; UvaUerHotei 
Corporatiai; ConuwwwiWi College; The Dwim 
CompMiles: Farm Fresfc Snperaiarlfiets; Fetbes Can- 
dies; Goodman Segar Hog an; Kafc' Gieli; Ume^ 
Realty Corp.; Dberty DateMi, Ud.; Metro taioriMtton 
Services; R.G. Moaw Bnildlni Corp.; P*ter Jwlck 
Copies Inc.; Price's Inc.; ScteD Supply Corp.; Sews, 
Roebock * Co., Ptembnite; Staali Bniders, toe.; 
Tandon's Pine TVee ton; Tea Pndi Co. toe.; Tlie Trane 
Co.; Tmt Value Home Onter Inc.; Vlrginta laedrk & 
Power Co.; Vlrginta NatioMl Bank; WMWt-Radio-- 
it-94; Ewt Const Screen Printinf toe.; Rnben H. 
DooneUy; Haynes; tegf ctts; and Ranuda Oceanfroot. 



Back Bay 
Study Office 

The Back Bay Study 
Committee has established 
an office at the Virginia 
Beach Municipal Center. 
The office will be staffed 
by the Committee's con- 
sultants. Roy Mann 
Associates, Inc^. en- 
vironmental planners and 
landscape architects, who 
will analyze water quality, 
fisheries and waterfowl, 
and land use management 
practices in the nine mon- 
th study of Back Bay and 
its watershed. (Jason M. 
Cortell and Associates, 
Inc., environmental 
engineers and biologists, 
are technical consultants 
on the project.) 



PMIlUPSi 



Jetty] 



YNNHAVEN 

Sixty -S« ' 

80iS.LynnJiavenRd. 

y^el^oy^i^^^^ 340-5480 

Bait, Gas & Ice 

(Fresh Bait & Tackle) 



Look for our 
Grand Opening Soon! 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
Transmi^ion • Brakes • Tuaeup 
• General Repairs • 



i: 





...NOT "SEASHELLS", 
...BUT, "HOMESHELLS", 

Room Additions ''on the HalfShelV 
Wedotheoutside...Youdotheimide 



We can make your home beautiful & functional 
for a price that is affordable... but, most of 
all, we will make your home... 

ENERGY EFFICIENT ! ! 

• FREE ESTIMATES* ______^ 



April Special 



•FREE INSULATION WITH SIDING AND 
INSTALLATION ORDER. LIFETIME GUARANTEE. 



•25% OFF ACROSEAL ® insulated 

REPLACEMENT WINDOW. FEATURING ONE INCH 
INSULATED GLASS WITH TILT-IN WINDOW SASHES 
AND SCREENS WITH OPTIONAL BUILT IN ALARM. 
OUR MOST REQUESTED ENERGY SA VING PRODUCT!! 



• INSULATED SKYLIGHT SPECIAL. . .WE EVEN HAVE 
SOME THAT OPEN! 



•BROCHURES AND CONSULTATION AVAILABLE 
AT OUR SHOWROOM FOR "DO-IT-YOURSELFERS". 
WE WILL SHOW YOU THE PROPER WAY 
OF INSTALLING OUR ENERGY 
EFFICIENT PRODUCTS. 

•25 YEARS EXPERIENCE SOLVING HOME OWNER 
PROBLEMS IN ALL PHASES OF REMODELING 
AND REPAIRS. 

Satisfied customer references only... 

Because that's all we have... 

We guarantee it! i i 

THE ENERGY CLINIC, INC. 

3902 COLLEY avenue, NORFOLK, VA 23508 
(804) 625-4747 (804) 490-8303 



■1^ 



i«vniiKi«..i 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 13, 1983 



7- 



vn 



Attend The Services 

Of Your Choosing 

In Tidewater 



Sunday 

Luke 

19:28-40 



Monday 

Luke 
19:41-48 



Tuesday 
Exodus 
12:1-14 



Wednesday 

Luke 

22:47-71 



Thursday 

Luke 

23 1-25 



Friday 

Mark 

15:21-41 



Saturday 

Luke 
23;50-56 







his noia pretty picture 



The crosses m the shadows were real. Three 
hung there and died in agony... two for their 
own wrong-doing... one for yours. 

That chapter to which the Book lies 
open— it tells of the scandal... the in- 
dignity... the injustice— and the pain. 



^^ PROVIDENCE ROAD - VIRGINIA BEACH. VIRGIHIA V 

vAtiJ'-< lWa«» lUffui'M —^ *»*••» *^" ''**^' 

Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 



The Ulies?... symbols of what men call 
Easter Day! When the women found the tomb 
empty... and were afraid to believe He was 
risen... 

IT is not a pretty picture. IT is the stark 
reminder of man's distrust of God... and 
God's love of man. 

And you'll let nothing keep you form wor- 
shipping your Lord when you stop thinking of 
IT as a pretty picture. 
rr happened. 

For you— IT happened. 



Announcements 



Indian River BapUst Church, Sunday, April 24th. 7:30 
p.m., The Sacred Concert by "His Own" of corner- 
stone ministries. 



3tlS.NcwtowaRoiid 
>wfalk,Va..23SU 




OJlDTIMNSl* 



SUNDAY 

9-MkM. OH*- 
nMKM. 



461-5041 



WQ)NISDAY 
DAILY 



f itow C tl l w «H 

R! L. Kay, Pastor Danny R. ThDmas.>4isocM<e fayiw 



H 



(804)340-1441 



"fgOpenDoor 
Chapel 

3177 Va. Beach Blvd., Va. Beach, Va., 23452 

%NDAY TUESDAY 

SuAvSchool 9:1SAM MUcSii^ 10:0eAM 

Wofsl#ScrTicc IMAM 

....ll-JIAM WEDNESDAY 

PnriMScrvkc .fcMPM Midweek Scnrkc .... 74* PM 



f—* 



Kings Grant Baptist Cliurch 

«73 Little Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 



WEDNESDAY 



SUNDAY 

Monrfig WwiUp . . . Ml «.■ 

fluiirff-* — ' 9Mnjm. 

Su*vS(feMl IMlBA 

MMrt« WonMp . . llMui 

E*Mta«W«ii^ ...7MpJB. PnaPwSerrkt... 

Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
340-0902 



i'» 



.<:Mp.i 



CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

4925 Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard Campbell, Pastor 

495-1004 
Youth L.I.F.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. 




M mwTMTHm n mewMmn 
imiu^MmYcmiRmi 

IMDIAMmVER 

BAPrmrcHURCH 

I€OOLmn«IAvmim 
CfcMiyMii«,Va., 21325 

Phate W, McSmm, Jr. Pastor 



CJar J^oad M^M^ of Qod 







^) MJta.a. 

rutiiiili 111 'ill f^ip.B. 

Ttuii|i Ya«m ^fcl>. . fJIpjB, 
Wciwiv Italic N^M7-Ji ^jm. 




Student Creative Writing 
Winter 

The thing I like best about winter is snow. You 
can make snowballs. You can ask your best friend 
to make snowmen. You can do lots of things with 
snow. You can ski in it. 

Sometimes it freezes the river. Then you can ice 
skate. You can really have snowfights! 
By lfw€tt T«rk«iii«. I, dM«kter of Hn* nd Sm Tutortaa. 
Tnxtt h I iWrd gndcr la Mn. Uada Kwtoafw' ch« ■! Ph« 
Eleomtao School. Tfec Pitadpal It Hori Wi%hl. 

Virginia Beach 

I like many things about Virginia Beach. I like 
Oceana the best because I like to watch the jets 
and my dad works there. 

1 like Mt. Trashmore because I can ride my bike 
down the path. I like Virginia Beach because it is 
warm most all year round. 

I also like Virginia Beach b«ause their police 
force is very strong. 

By David Neboa. if., 9, sob of Mr. aai Mn. David aad Pwda 
NdMM. David k a lUrd gnulcf la Mn. Uada Koaloatat.' dan 
■I Plan. 



Egging Houses 



Egging people's houses is a very bad thing. 
Some older kids sneak out at night. They go 
around and egg people's houses. Its just terrible. 
Sometimes it stains the brick and never comes off. 

Virginia Beach would be much nicer without 
people egging houses. 

By Mike GaUtaa, », mm of Mr. aad Mn. JomM Galiaa. 
MIkt b a flfth grader la Mn. Betty OaaiaoNi' ctai at Wood- 
stock EteBwalary Sckool. Tkc prtadpal li SUrlcy Baico. 



Unemployment 



Unemployment is too high. I think they should 
find jobs in the government. 

They should not lay-off so many workers in 
companies. They should train people for positions 
in companies. Also put people into training for the 
armed forces. 

By Tad Zcpnikowiki, H, wa of Mr. aad Mn. T. J. Zep- 

nikowski. Ttd U a flfth grader la Mrs. Betty Oampott't daM at 
Woodstock. 



Bullock 

Weds 

Wallace 

Ivy Creek United 
Methodist Church in 
Charlottsville, Va; was the 
setting Saturday. March 
26 of the wedding of Miss 
Trina Ellene Bullock to 
Mr. John Craig Wallace. 

Miss Bullock is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
David E. Bullock of 
Charlottesville, Va. and 
formerly of Virginia 
Beach. 

Mr. Wallace is the son 
of Mrs. Margaret 
Kujawinski of 

Macadonia, Ohio and Mr. 
Craig Vincent Wallace of 
Sugarland, Texas. 

Miss Bullock is a 
graduate of Kempsville 
High School and Old 
Dominion University. 

Mr. Wallace is a 
graduate of University of 
Ohio Law School. 

Mrs. Mindy Nicolas of 
Washington served as 
maid-of-honor with Miss 
Diane Elsy of Cleveland, 
Ohio, and Miss Tonia 
Bullock of Charlottesville, 
Va. sister of the bride as 



Arts Center 



Continued from Pa«e I 

catagories were selected 
for purchase awards. 
The various sponsors of 
the awards received the 
selected artwork through 
$250 cash prizes given to 
the artists. The Mayor's 
Trophy winner by Von- 
nie Whitworth also was 
selected for a purchase 
award in the painting 
catagory sponsored by 
Virginia Beach Savings 
and Loan. Karen and 
Jim Chalkley won the 
ceramics award spon- 
sored by Smith and 
Welton for their respec- 
tive works. Edward 
Zingraff received the 
printmaking award 
sponsored by Pacific 
Places Shoppes in Vir- 
ginia Beach. Ruth 
Peerless won the drawing 
award sponsored by Barr 




Pharmacy in Virginia 
Beach. Art Bouwman 
was selected for the 
photography award 
sponsored by WGH FM 
Radio and Ruth Scarlott 
won the Other Media 
award sponsored by J. 
C. Penney's. 

Other awards included 
10 Awards of Merit and 
10 Honorable Mentions. 

"We were pleased not 
only with the quantity of 
artwork in this year's 
show, but with the ex- 
cellent quality," said 
Frederick Schmid, Arts 
Center director. "All of 
the work had been ac- 
complished over the past 
12 months. We inten- 
tionally made this one of 
the requiremenu to en- 
courage artists to CTeate 
new and fresh work. The 
results have been ni<»t 
gratifying. 



Mrs. Wallace 

bridesmaids. Flower girl 
was Miss Stephanie Hor- 
ton of Chesapeake, Va.. 
niece to the bride. 

Mr. Steve Wallace ser- 
ved as his brothers best 
man with brothers Mr. 
Don Wallace and Mr. 
David Wallace as grooms- 
men . 

After the honeymoon 
the couple will reside in 
San Clemente, Calif, 
where Miss Bullock is a 
sales rcprescnmtivc for 
Union Carbide and Mr. 
Wallace is associated with 
the Kern. Walley and 
Maloney law firm of Los 
Angeles. 



Princess Anne Women Meet 



The GFWC Princess 
Anne Woman's Club of 
Virginia Beach held it's 
April meeting at Tan- 
dem's Pine Tree Inn on 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. 
Lunch followed the 
meeting. 

Mrs. Tony Sloan, 
program chairman, enter- 
tained members with a 
fashion show. La Vogue 
supplied the fashions and 
models were members of 
the club. 

At the recent Spring 
District Meeting held at 
Holiday Inn Scope, the 
club received first place 



awards in leadership, 
home life, public affairs 
and Legislation. An: 
honorable mention was 
presented in creative arts.. 
Blue ribbons in arts and, 
crafts were won by Mrs.' 
Robert J. Boyd, Mrs. Earl. 
DuVal, Mrs. C.A. Miller 

Club members Mrs." 
A.R. Bunting, Mrs. G.C. 
Greham and Mrs. T. M. 
McCrory announced that 
$870.50 was raised for 
their part in the Rock-A- , 
Thon for Cancer recently 
held at Pembroke Mall. 



Cape Henry Women Meet 



The G.F.W.C. Cape 
Henry's Woman's Club of 
Virginia Beach has been 
presented nine awards at 
the Tidewater District 
Spring Awards luncheon 
recently held at Holiday 
Inn, Scope. 

These awards were 
presented from the 
Wontan's Clubs that have 
over 100 members. 

First place awards were 
presented in two divisions: 
Safety and Creative Arts. 
Second place awards went 



to Family Living and 
Aging and Home 
Life/ Health divisions. A 
third place award was 
presented in Conservation 
and Garden division. 
Honorable Mentions wei^ 
presented in fou^ 
divisions: Leader-^ 
ship/Personal Develop*; 
ment, Legislation an^ 
Public Affairs. Mcmbeih 
ship award for the iiH 
crease in members during 
1982. 



I 



Ocean Park Women Meet 



1983 Members* Show Awards 

Mayor's Trophy: Voaiiie WWtwortli 

Awards of Excdleocc: 
Pat Reno.- "Cameron" (oil on linen); 



Pat Rena - "Cameron" (oil on Unen); CarollBe 
Ncwblli - "The Unwilling" (colored pencil): Lan- 
ce Chandler - Untitled Painting (oil/acryUc); 
Karen Chalkky - "Faceted Basket" (porcelain); 
Skippy ABderwa - "Homage to ClothesUne #2" 
(watercolor); Ruth ScaHoM - "MedaUion for Nep- 
tune" (hand cast paper); and Art Boowomb - 
"Autumn Mud" (photography). 

Awards ol Merit 

CaritoB Abbot • "Sky Steps" (pastel & pencU); 
Rath Fecriew - "Surf Rider" (pastel); NaKjr 
Rooney - Untitled (acryUc); Normaa Goodwta - 
Tides at 4:00" (premacolor & Graphite); D^ni 
ScoN - "Aryan Blue" (oil); Jack Speacer - "Fore" 
(acrylic): Frank Walker ■ "Moonrise 
(photography); Lacelte Rltter - "By the Window 
(acrylic); PhyUb Mklgett Howell - "Winter Trees 
Along the Canal" (photography); and WUHaai 
GcBz - Untitled (porcelain). 

HoBonbk McattoBi 

Loab JoKS - "Blue Christmas" (egg tempera); 
Noma Dadley - "Burst of Spring" (watercolor); 
JcBBic Powell - "Spring" (pastel); Edward RoeliBi 
. "Porch Scene" (watercolor); Naacy Roir - 
"Flying Lotus" (fiber); Pat Reed - "Reedinp 
(weaving); G«orfla«B Grover - Stained Gtass; G. 
E Ohea - "Torso" (sculpture); Ami* F. mytn - 
Gray Lady" (oil); and Joyce Woodsoa - "Pole 
BCTries" (watercolw). 

PvdmcAwwii 

PainUng - Voarfe Wtttworti; ceramics - Kaiw 
rt^m.uj . Jim OuOkf, printmaking - V4mv4 
BatrafT; drawing - Radi Peeitaa; photogra^y - 
]Crt BoBwaaa; and aU oth« media - Rirth 
Scariott. 



Tlie CFWC Ocean Park 
Woman's Qub has been 
awarded eleven ribbons at 
the Tidewater District 
Arts and Crafts Contest, 
held recently at the Ports- 
mouth Woman's Club. 
"Hie nine blue ribbon win- 
ners were Lorraine Ash; 
Kathleen Cooper, who 
won two; Sarah Davis; 
SWriey Emerson; Flora 
Gattuso; Thelma Balston; 
and Joyce Whitaker. 
These ribbon winning 



items will now be judgd| 
at the VFWC Convention 
in Richmond in April. : 
Barbara Engle won ;i 
red ribbon and Mick|f 
Lukas won a yellow rij| 
bon. :| 

(la 

"Ocean Park Womaall 
Qub is indeed proud it 
the recognition brought & 
its o-ganization by the« 
ouutanding enuies," sot 
Oiarlotte Cash, a cl* 
spdcesman. :« 



1 i«> 

Governor's School For Gifted| 

The Old Donation anter for the Qfted and Talente|, 
1008 Ferry Plantation Road, will host 1983 participant 
in Governor's School on Tuesday, April 19 at 6:30 p.iB. 

A reception wUl honor the 20 students from Virgma 
Beach Schools who have been invited to participate m. 
Longwood College. Virginia Polytechnical Institutf, 

and NASA. : 

The fdlowing students were selected to atte^ 
Governor's Schod this summer: „,.„• X 

■aytide Hf h School: Bonnie Gale Bishop, Willi!^ 
Foster Marx, and Tina Louise Messner. : 

One ifcary Cotegtate School: Kim Ferguson. ; 

Fraak W. Cox High School: Catherine Elizabe|h 
Capertoo, David Kyvck Eun, Leslicr Carmen Lowe. a|d 
Moiiique Marie Travelstead. ' 

Flnt CokMial Hfh School: Michael Rowe Davis aad 
Douglas McCarley Garrou. J^ 

Cntu Rbb Will School: Kathryn O. Mallap. 
Timothy Alan Maner. and Jill Michelle Redenbauglt 

flofd E. KcUaa Hf h Sdiool: Anne Uura McClfj- 

an ^ 

kcBptvUie Mgh Sclwol: Lilly Diane Chen. Erika %e 
Kammerer, Brian David Doehr and Bradford Rich^d 

PrtBCCis Abbc Hgh Sclwol: Robert Jorge Aruta ^ 
MattlMw Hiomas Ptante. i 

Governor's School is a four week residency progrjm 
toprovi«k enrichment opportunities to 450 of Virgu^ s 
most abte students. Students are able to select their 
area of coocentnttion and are assigned to locations ;on 

that basis. 

Tlie reception will be given by parents of the Virginia 
Bnch Association of Gifted and Talented. ] 



■M 



W 



HWOTPW««l^ 



-' s- 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, April 13. 1983 



Business, Real Estate ft Finance 




Hospital Names 
Director 



(L. to R., seated) Samiy Stewart, Margaret McKengle, Gloria Daont, (L. to 
R. standing) Marie Bailey, Bessie Lawrence, Ann I^ps. 

NABW State Conference 
Scheduled 



Garrett Snyder, R.P.T., 
has been named director 
of the physical thmipy 
department at Virginia 
Beach General Hospital. 

Snyder graduated from 
Old Dominion University 
with bachelor's degrees in 
Biology/Psychology and 
Physical Therapy. An ac- 
tive member of the 
American Physical 
Therapy Association, 
Snyder came to Virginia 
Beach General in 1981 as a 
staff physical therapist. 



Snyder resides in 
Virginia Beach with his 
wife, ^uan, who also is a 
ph^ical therapist. 

The Physical Tbovpy 
Department at Virginia 
Beach General Hospital 
continually works toward 
the prevention of 
disability, the relief of 
pain, the restoration of 
muscle function and 
strength, and ultimately 
returning the {Nitient to 
the fullest possible ac- 
tivities. 



Focusing on "Strategies 
for Success" the Virginia 
State Conference of the 
National Association of 
Bank Women, Inc., will 
be held April 22-23 at the 
Williamsburg Hilton, 
Williamsburg, Va. 
Women bank executives 
from across the state will 
attend the conference. 

Kicking off the con- 
ference program Friday, 
April 22nd, will be a 
wekome from Mary Ixe 
Darling, vice mayor of 
Williamsbtu-g. Margaret 
McKenzie, conference 
chairman, will presde at 
the opening ceremonies. 
The^ keynote address, 
"Organization Structure- 
Bank's Changing Perspec- 
tives," will be delivered by 
Nancy B. Boruch, second 
vice president of Con- 
tinental Illinois Leasing 
Corporation. 

At 10:30 a.m. a panel 
discussion on "Strat^c 
Planning Techniques for a 
Changing Environment" 
will be moderated by 
Gerald T. McDonald, 
senior vice president and 
treasurer of Citizens Trust 
Bank in Portsmouth, Va. 
Panelists will by John B. 
Bernhardt, president, 
Virginia National Bank; 
Charles Reynolds, 
president, Atlantic 
National Bank; Henry 
Sadler, executive vice 
president. Bank of 
Virginia; Frank R. 
Bloxom, Jr., senior \i<x 
president. First and Mer- 
chants Bank. 

"A Vision of the New 
NABW" will be the topic 
of the educational lun- 



cheon presentation by 
NABW Southeast regiomd 
director, Linda Bramblett, 
vice president. People 
National Bank, 

Shelbyville, Tennessee. 

On Saturday, April 
23rd, programs will lead 
off with "Career 
Strategies for Women" 
given by The Honorable 
Betty J. Diener, secretary 
pf Commerce & Resour- 
ces, Commonwealth of 
Virginia. 

Two concurrent 
workshops will begin at 
11:00 a.m. Th^ are: 
"Productive Power" led 
by Nancy B. Boruch, 
second vice president. 
Continental Illinois 
Leasing Co^ration; and 
"Receiving Performance 
Api^aisals" with Dennis 
and Diane La Mountain, 
La Mountain & Associates 
Consultants, Richmond, 

The luncheon speaker 
will be NABW State 
Council chairman, Donna 
Marie Joy, assistant vice 
president, Central Fidelity 
Bank. 

Beginning at 2:30 p.m. 
concurrent workshops will 
include "Personal 
Profiling" led by Julie 
White, Ph.D., president 
of J. White Associates, a 
training and consulting 
firm in Norfolk, Va.; and 
"Time Management" 
with Judi S. Coleman, 
member of United 
Virginia Bank's 

organization Developemt 
and Training Department. 

That evening, The 
Honorable G. William 
Whitehurst, Member of 



You're Bright. 

Ambitious & Successful. 
So why are you bored? 




Most jobs are like this: you start Uke a house on 

first, learn all tnere is to know, ttoi you end up 

doing the same thing day after day after day. 

When you work vidth CENTURY 21* METRO, 

no one sets limits on your growth; you earn as 

much as you're worth at your own pmx. 

Call us about our scholarship programs and our 

eitensive real estate training. 

For a brighter future, join CENTURY 21* 

METRO. You'll iKver be bored. You have our 

word on that. 

We will DOUBLE 
OUR SIZE IN 1983 




guBt^oHTraraL" 



COME GlIO^ WITH U%» 



Congress. 2nd District, 
Va., will be the banquet 
speaker. His topic will be 
"Social Security 
Reform." 

Virginia Bankers taking 
part in conference plan- 
ning include conference 
chairman, Margaret P. 
McKenzie, vice president, 
Old Point National Band; 
vice chairman, Bessie 
Lawrence, marketing 
research officer, Virginia 
National Bank; and com 
mittee chairmen: Gloria 
M. Daout, corporate ser- 
vice officer, Virginia 
National Bank Sandy 
Stewart, assistant trust of- 
ficer, Citizens Trust Bank; 
Marie Bailey, assistant 
vice president, Virginia 
Nationid Bank; Ann Hp- 
ps, credit cards sales of- 
ficer, Virginia National 
Bank; Jerry Braband, 
commercial administrative 
officer. United Virginia 
Bank. 

The Virginia State con- 
ference is sponsored an- 
nually by the National 
Association of Bank 
Women. Iiic, to provide a 
forum for women. Inc., to 
provide a forum for 
women bank executives to 
develop and exchange 
ideas and keep them up- 
dated on what they need 
to know. NABW's more 
than 28,000 members hold 
managerial positions in 
banking institutions in all 
SO states and Canada. Its 
services and programs en- 
NHirage professional ex- 
cellence and career growth 
for all women in 'he 
banking industries. 




Roger Pyle 



jaaiere The Ideas 
Come From 



Barbara A. Hoettig 



Huettig 
Selected 
Outstanding 
Woman 

Barbara A. Huettig of 
Chesapeake has been 
selected Outstanding 
Young Career Women by 
District VI of the Virginia 
Federation of Business 
and Professional Womans 
QafK. Ms. Huettig was 
fint chosen to represent 
the Southside Business 
and Professional Womens 
Club of Chesapeake and 
competed with other club 
candidates in District VI 
in March, 1983. The Out- 
standing Young Career 
Woman Award is given by 
judges based on a young 
woman's career 




achievements ai^~gofls, 
community service and 
commitment to women's 
issues, as promoted by 
BPW. 

Barbara Huettig is 
presentiy Assistant to Vice 
President of Alliance 
Health Systems. She was 

most recently an Assistant 
Administrator of 
Chesapeake General 
Hospital until March 
1983. Ms. Huettig 
graduated from Em<^ 
University and received 
her MS in Hospital Ad- 
ministration from Georgia 



"sate Dravcrsity^ She is 
active in niunerous civic 
and health professional 
organizations and has 
taught professional tennis 
for the past six years. Ms. 
Huettig has been a 
resident of Chesapeake 
since 1981, 

The Virginia Federatiwi 
of Business and 
Professional Womens 
Clubs wiU hold their state 
convention May 19-21 at 
the Omni in Norfolk. Ms. 
Huettig will " represent 
District VI and compete 
for the state Young Career 
Woman Award. 



Not all ideas for this 
column come from the 
ibrary, ahhough this area 
nas very excellent and up- 
(0 date reference libraries. 

We try to keep a good 
flow of newspapers and 
current professional 
publications coming in 
from all over the country 
and some international 
publications The idea fctf 
the Zero Interest fimrndflg 
that was first sucxe^u^*^ 
Used here bf one^ofw-' 
largest jmd mo^^fiipuMMr' ' 
builders original^ <}amt 
from an articte iit thi 
Oklahoma City newspaptf 
that my mother sent td 
me. We also get 
newspapers and 

publications from Dallas, 
Houston and Phoenix. I 
find that the people in the 
Southwest are very ttlvan- 
ced in their thinking in 

the Real Esute/Kkl. lam 
pleased to note that we are 
ahead of them in the area 
of resort Condo-Hotels. tt 
very profitable new Real 
Estate concept that in- 
volve tax advantages, ac< 
celerated apprcdatioa and 
the pleasures of a vacation 
home. A recent big article 
in the Oklahoma City 
newspaper - Front page of 



the Sunday Business Sec- 
tion - was written about 
local businessmen backing 
the Resort Condo Hotel 
project in Colorado. THe 
article said that 
"Although the condo- 
hotel has been popular in 
Europe, it is just getting 
off in the United States. 
Only about 16 such 
projects in variotis stages 
of competion nationwide, 
one of the most popular 
being the now-complete, 
314-room Mariner in 
Hilton Head, S.C, which 
sold out completely to in- 
vestors only about three 



months." 

Virginia Beach has three 
such Condo Hotels on the 
oceanfront. Marjac was 
first. It has been sold out 
for over a year and is 
making money for it's 
buyers. Station One and 
Ambassador at 24th and 
Oceanfront are enjoying 
brisk sales. Station One 
sold out completely in 3 
months and Ambassador 
is almcMt sold out. 

It's good to know what , 
our neighbors are doing. 
It's great to knpw that 
sometimes we do things 
better! 



^^OUR PRIMTED WORD*' 
IS QUALITy 



FOR YOUR 
BUSINESS 
FORMS AND 
LETTERHEADS 



mKfamimui 



m 




SPECIAL! 

*59.95 

lOOO Letterhead 
1000 Envelopes 

NO CHARGE FOR 

negative*, plates or 
typcscttinf. 



RML ICALU 




CALL BRAD AT 

486-0300 ^ M» Oconee Ave. • Va. Beach 

— RWanRTS MAILING. LTD 



Serving The Real Estate Needs 
Of Chesapeake 

WAIN WRIGHT REALTY 

Are you considering selling your home? If so, now is the ideal 
time. Call us fbr a free, no obligation market analysis. We will in- 
form you of the best methods of disposing of your property, 
vnrious types of financing available and other information per- 
tinent to the sale of yo ur property . 

3237 Western Branch Blvd. 

In The Heart Of Churchland 

414-7777 

Members of Portsmouth, Oienpeake Multiple Listing Sovice 
Metro Muhijdc Usting Service 
Portamoutli, Chesapeake Boaitl of Rodtors 






We're Number 1 
In Great Bridge 

• Rcsideniial 

• Commercial 
•Farms 

^N>cci«N«i!i 

Serving ChesapMlkc Since 19M 



3^if actio, Jfnc. 

REALTORS® 

MILDRED B. RICARDO 
PRESIDENT 



m 

(CALTOW 




3S1 JohDstowB Rmid, Chnapeakc, Va. 

• In the Heart of Great Bridge 
•54T4555 







5 no Greenwich Rd. 

Va. Bch., VA 23462 

499-333e 

ADIVISiON OF OOUHOALKKVICE CORPORATION 



OAtiantfe Pennaiient Mortgage Conipaiiy 

A Wholly Owned Subsidiary of Atlaotic Permanent Federal 
Savii^AIJoanAModatiwi 

SM4 Indqioidaice Blvd. 

Virginia Beach. Virpua 234SS 

(WM)460-U76/28t0 



^8o4(m4€U 




A DIVISION OF COLONIAL SERVICE GORPORATKm 

Virginia Beach Boulevard West 

Norftrtk, Virginia 2?510 

Phone (8C»4) 623-3753 



LyOlonial cJitic 
Jrtgency 

A nVBKW OF OOUWIAL SRVKX (XMPOmATKW 

944 Inctependence Blvd. 
Va Bch.VA 23455 




SCHOOL 

ISNTJUST 
FOR KIDS..., 



Since 1972 we've trained 

some of the most successful 

realtors and brokers in the 

Tidewater Area. Our graduates 

come from all walks of life. 

Some make Real Estate a 

car^r, other enjoy the 

freedom of part time selling, 

while many home owners 

take our course for 

their own personal 

knowledge. If you've 

ever been intrigued by 

Real Estate, give us a 

call today. Going to 

school can be fun. . .and profitable. 



SURETY 

REAL ESTATE SCHOOL 

5737 Prin^^ Anne Road 
Virginia Beach, VA 23462 (804) 499-2395 



i\ 



IB 



iWV 



•wn^r^^x 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 13, 1983 9 



ft} 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



1 




Small Home Offers HopeEor future 



An attractive home that 
will sell for $23,000 in 
most sections of the coun- 
try has been created 
through a joint project of 
three leading shelter 
authorities to help solve 
America's housing crisis. 

Family Circle magazine, 
Redman Homes, Inc., 
Dallas, Texas, and Ar- 
mstrong World Industries, 
Inc., Lancaster, Pa., 
combined efforts to 
develop the 924 square 
foot home which is 
featured in the April 19 
issue of the magazine. 

Through the combined 
efforts of the three par- 
ticipants, the 14'x66' 
home makes maximum 
use of space and attractive 
amenities to compensate 
for the compact size. 

Focal point of the in- 
terior is the 13'x25' living 
area containing living 
room, dining room and 
kitchen, deflned by fur- 
niture and counter 
placement instead of 
waU& A4»Ubalral cdli% 
, extends tlW>4lii|Mi «f ^ 
spacee and into the 
13'xl3' mas^ bedroom 
at one end. A snaaller 
bedroon) designed as a 



bedroom/den is located at 
the opposite end. 

To further open up the 
space, sliding glass patio 
doors were designed on 
the same side as the back 
door and an Alenco 
gTMnhouse window was 
installed above the kitchen 
sink on the front side. 
Double windows were 
designed in the living 
room and master 
bedroom. The front door 
opens on a small mirrored 
entryway at one end of the 
great living area. 

Quality materials were 
used throughout the home 
including carpets, resilient, 
flooring and ceilings from 
Armstrong; Masonite 
prefinished hardboard lap 
siding; draperies; 240- 
poiud composition roof 
shingles; Whirlpool 
refrigerator and dish- 
washer and a Magic Chef 
range. 

Complete with all in- 
terior fmishes and ap- 
pliancn, the home has a 
suggested . retail . price of 
S25,000 shipped and set 
up at the buyer's lot. In 
most sections of the coun- 
try, it will be possible to 
move into the home com- 



plete with land for $30,000 
or under. ' 

The prototype home 
was set up and landscaped 
on a 1/4 acre lot in a 
residential neighborhood 
near Rendon, Texas- 
south of thii Arlington- 
Fort Worth area~by Y's 
Mobile Homes in. 
cooperation with Redman 
Homes. 

Optional weather 
resistant wood decking 
from Louisiana Pacific 
was installed at the front 
of the home and at the 
rear off the patio doors 
and the site was lan- 
dscaped by Andersen's 
Greenery of Arlington to 
demonstrate the attrac- 
tiveness of the home. 

The home is built to 
comply with standards 
established by the Depar- 
tment of Housing and Ur- 
ban Development in 1976 
and can be flnanced by 
conventional, VA and 
FHA mortgage plans. 

Quality construction is 
carefully controlled under 
indoor^ctovy condfdon^. 

The production line ef- 
ficiencies make it possible 
to ship and set up the 
home at the site within 



two to six weeks of order. 
Redman will build the 
home in several plants 
located throughout nuMt 
sections of the country 
and will have models 
available throughout a 
network of r^ailert. 

The 14' wide home 
made as a single unit was 
selected for the project 
because it offers the most 
low-cost ef flciencies and is 
the moist poplar style in 
the country. Family Cir- 
cle's Home Projects 
Editor Robert L. Ander- 
son said. ______ 

"With the average price 
for new single family 
homes between $80,000 
and $90,000, it is im- 
possible for most people 
to buy a home," Ander- 
son said, "Because of 
this, there is a definite 
trend toward downsiang 
but this doesn't mean a 
reduction in quality. We 
felt an attractive, well- 
built mobile home would 
help answer the desperijte 
need Tdr housing." 

He pointed out the 36% 
of all single family homes 
sold in 1981 were mobije 
homes. 



A Custom Townhouse Community in 

the Urban Tradition. We offer 

exceptional quality at 

affordable prices 




Surge 
Reported 
In Home 
Sales 



Goodman Segar H<^an 
Residential Sales Cor- 
poration recently reported 
an increase of 1 IS per cent 
in sales volume for the fir- 
st quarter of 1983 over 
1982 figures, according to 
Oicar B. Ferebee, Jr., 
presidebt of the com- 
pany. 

Goodman Segar Jlogan 
has been involved in the 
sale of 1,132 homes in the 
fint three months of this 
year which represents over 
$80,000,000 in residential 
real estate. Sales activity 
exceeded for the first time 
a rate that's greater than 
selling a home every hour 
every day compared to 
past activity of a home 
every two hours every day. 

"The tremendous 
amount of business in the 
rtti atate industry is a 
sure sign of economic 
recovery," Ferebee said. 
"Even in our area, which 
has not felt the full force 
of the recMsion. the in- 
crease in housing activity 
is a very positive sign." 



Ferebee poiated out fur- 
ther that '83's housing 
recovery is due principally 
to more affordable in- 
terest rates. For example, 
monthly payments (prin- 
cipal and interest) on the 
median priced home 
na||oni»Uy are today down 
$2$QH;>er month over th«r 
petkiuil982! That means 
i thtt it takes roughly 
$10,000 less income per 
year to qualify for the 
same home this year as 
last year. 

It's clear that many 
families have re-entered 
the housing market with 
these more affordable 
rates as reflected in our 
recent sales increases," 
sutasd FerebM. 

Goodman Segar Hogan 
is tlw largest independent 
real estate firm in 
Southeastern Virginia 
with over 350 sales 
associates in 13 offices 
throu^out Tidewatn and 
the Peniruula. The firm 
projects 1983 sales volume 
to exceed $200 million. 



The Builders 
Block 

Wf Doag Hickman 

I EKilt Etflor 



The Builders Block is a 
r^ular feature highlight- 
ing new construction in 
VirglBia Beach and 
Chesapeake. 




An Affordable 
Alternative 



You'd like to improve 
the quality of your fam- 
ily's life. You'd like a V* 
or '/j acre lot on a cul-de- 
sac in a quiet residential 
neighborhood, but you 
need nearby shopping, 
schools, churches, and 
interstate ease. Poplar 
Ridge South in Chesa- 
peake may be right for 
you. 

Located just 3 miles 
from the interstate, you're 
only twenty minutes to 
downtown Norfdk, thirty 
nuniUes boia the ocean 
front and five minutes 
from sh(^ping, schools 
and churches in Great 
Bridge. 

Poplar Ridge South 
was opened in January of 
this year, and to date over 
2 million dollars in volume 
has been recorded with an 
average of two homes sold 
per week! There will be 
two hundred forty home- 
sites available averaging 
'/4 to Vi acre with city 
maintained water and 
sewer. Most of the lots are 
situated on cul-de-sacs to 
reduce the noise of un- 



wanted traffic, and insure 
a much safer neighbor- 
hood for children and 
pets. 

These three and four 
bedroom homes are all 
brick construction and are 
true colonial style ranches 
with four models avail- 
able. Virtually any varia- 
tion in interrior design 
may be requested, short 
of moving a load-bearing 
wall. 

This very accommodat- 
ing builder is Bill Hear- 
ring, owner of Hearndon 
Construction Corp. and the 
current president of the 
Tidewater Builders Asso- 
ciation. A reputation for 
successful developments 
and an eye for detail and 
quality fdlows Hearring 
to Poplar Ridge South. 
He developed and built 
the majority of Etheridge 
Manor, which last year 
accounted for approxi- 
mately fifty percent of all 
building permits issued in 
Chesapeake. Hearring 
was active in Wilson 
Heights, and was the sole 
devel(^r of Briar wood. 



"Many buyers are find- 
ing they get much more 
house for their money at 
Poplar Ridge South, 
"said Tom Seddon, site 
agent and vice president 
of Ricardo Realty, the 
marketing arm behind 
this development. 
Recardo, since their 
inception in 1973, has 
seen Great Bridge change 
from a sleepy area to a 
progressive community 
where property values are 
on the rise, but the area 
still retains a relaxed, 
friendly atmosphere. 
"Eighty percent of our 
buyers come from the 
beach for the spacious 
secure atmosphere we 
enjoy in Chesapeake. To 
get this quality home on 
this size lot, would cost 
considerably more any 
where else in Tidewater," 
said Tom Seddon. 

At these prices for this 
type of quality, consider 
this an affordable alterna- 
tive to smaller lots and 
higher mortgages in more 
populated areas. '- 





If you've been trying to sell your home, or looking for one more suited 
to your ne^s, perhaps you should call us. Last month our team sold one 
house every day for thirty days, for a total of almost three million dollars 

in volume! If you need results. . . .CALL US 

We Sell A Home Every 
Two Hours... Every Day. 

Great Bridge Shopping Ctr., 237 S. Battlefield Blvd. 

482-3395 




CkHNlman Segar Hogan 



Congratulattons 
WUUe Colson 




$480,000 in true volume for the 

month of March! Willie had a 

tremendous 1982, but 1983 

is looking even better!! 



fm conrteow and prof essional 
service, can WHUe... 
482-4771 

or 
S47-82M 




Rhodes Rmlty, Ltd. 

ii$S, BattkfkUaM. Om. 



LANDS END 



$393 

PER MO. 



68 




•r«>«iNvft*«*Mi«> 



AFFORDABLE CONDOS 
AT THE BEACH 

•Monthly Principle & Interest 
VHDA - 5 yr. Buy Down (Limited 
Amount) 

$2650.00 DOWN PAYMENT 

ADD $50 For Taxes & Insurance 

MODELS: OPEN 12-642M1M 

NIGHTS: Alice Pyle 3404441 

PYLE REALTY 460-1777 




Pyk Realty Promotes 
Virginia ^cKh 



^m 



wtm 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, April 13, 1983 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



Clinics Opens At 
Pembroke 



Minor Emergency 
Clinics of Virginia, LTD., 
has enterd into a lease for 
4400 square feet of office 
space at 4S98 Broad 
across from Pem- 
One in Virginia 



Street, 

broke 

Beach. 

The 



clinic will offer 



medical treatment for 



non-life threatening 
emergencies. It will open 
around May 1 and have 
extended hours of 
operation seven days a 
week. 

Jim Owens of Harvey 
Lindsay and Company 
represented the tenant in 
the negotiation. 



Finance Courses 
Offered 



Two real estate finance 
courses will by offered by 
the Goodman Segar 
Hogan Training Co. on 



Thursday, April 14 at the 
Quality Inn Lake Wright 
Hotel, 6280 Northampton 
Blvd. 

An update to 
Traditional Financing 
seminar will take place 
from 9:00 a.m. until noon 



and an Alter- 

native/Creative Financing 
Seminar will begin at r;00 
p.m. and end at 4:00 p.m. 

The fee for each 
seminar is S25 and 
manuals for each course 
are available for $14.93. 

For information and 
reservations, call Cliff 
Kavanaugh at 460-4410 or 
595-3345. 




Gooch 
Named To 
Council 



William A. Gooch, an 
assistant vice president of 
E.F. Hutton in the firm's 
Virginia Beach office, has 
been named to Hutton's 
1983 Directors' Advisory 
Council. 

Membership in the 
council is limited to the 
firm's top 41 account 
Executives out of a tiJlahoP" f 
Qusre thafiiJflK , v^.,; 

Council members meet 
anjiuaUy to exchange in- 
vestor services ideas and 



to advise Hutton senior 
management on all facets 
of the retail investment 
business. 

Gooch, who joined 
Hutton in 1981, was 
previously an account 
executive with Merrill 
Lynch in Norfolk. 

He earned a bachelor's 
de|i<e*> ih business ad- 
Ittmistation from KM- 
tysburg College in 1979. 

Ctooch is a resident of 
Vji^inia Beach. 




ttiisi 





Allene M. Smith 



Annette Adkins 



VBF Promotes 
Smith & Adkins 



Allene M. Smith and 
Annette Adkins have been 
promoted within Virignia 
Beach Savings & Loan 
Association, the an- 
noucement has been made 
by William L. Owens, 
President. 

Smith becomes assistant 
secretary and personnel 
director, in addition to her 
responsibilities as 
secretary to the president. 
She has been with the 
Association since 1977 
and resides in Virignia 
Beach. 

Adkins becomes 



assistant secretary and 
Kempsville brancii 
manager. She has been 
with the Association since 
1977 and has been serving 
as Kempsville assistant 
branch manager. She and 
her family reside in 
Virginia Beach. 

Virginia Beach Federal' 
Savings & Loan has five 
area branches. The 
Association has increased 
savings more than 350% 
during the past 20 months, 
and is nationally ranked in 
the Top 25 in earnings. 



Prueare Names 
Martin Agency 



PruCare of Richmond, 
a subsidiary of Prudential 
Insurance Company of 
America, has named The 
Martin Agency as its 
public relations and adver- 
tising firm. 

PruCare is a health 
maintenance organization 
(HMO), an alternative in- 
surance plan under which 
medical providers meet 



the health care needs of 
subscriber-members for a 
prepaid fee. First in- 
troduced to Richmond 
this year, PruCare is 
Virginia's only HMO. 

The Martin Agency, is 
an 18-year-old marketing 
and communications firm 
with offices in Richmond, 
Washington and Virginia 
Beach. 



SINCE 1886, WE'VF 
MET TIDEWATER'S 
FI\Ai\CrAL NEEDS. 

WE'RE STILL 
GROWING TO MEET 
YOIRS. 



See us for rewarding savings plans and 
specialized loans. 

Home I^deml 

Savings and loan Association 

o( NorWk Orginiztd 1886 

Main Office 700 Boush Street. Norfolk, Vft; 627-6431 

Brancii Offices: TNxnas Comer / Port•mout^ / 

ftowt / Hampton / Sutfoui / Hilltop / 

Denbigh / Great Bridge ' Grafton 



Consolidate Your Bills 

24 HOUR APPROVAL 

Home Owner Loans 



• Complete Appication 
overphone 



•Deal Directly 
with Lender 




LANDBANK EQUITY 

CaU 1080 Laskin Rd. Va. Beach, Va 
Today (804) 425-6621 



9-6pmM-F 
9-1 pm Sat. 



CORP. 

23451 



PE€yRLB'B BANK 

Vf^Vc aU the hcmk you'll evaneed. 



Swce 



1966 



McDonald's Waves 
Goodbye To Litter 



''^OURPRIfiTEDWORD' 
t IS QUALIJy 



McDonald's restaurants 
in Tidewater, in 
cooperation with the 
Clean Community Com- 
mission, will sponsor a lit- 
ter awareness compaign 
during Clean Community 
WeekApril 15-23, 1983. 

Trayliners used in the 64 
McDonald's in Tidewater 
will urge customers to 
"Wave Goodbye To Lit- 
ter" By listing seven ways 
by which individuals can 



decrease litter in thdr 
ccmimunity. 

Virginia's litter problem 
costs taxpayers and 
businesses over $25 
million a year in clean-up 
alone. The message of the 
Clean Community Com- 
mission and McDonald's 
is that we can save money 
and save Tidewater's 
beauty with just a little 
thoughtful action on 
everyone's part. 



SPECIAL! 

•59.95 

lOOOUtterfecad 
lOeOEovdojMt 

NO CHAKGE FOR 

■cgallvM, piilcfl vr 




'^ 24390COMC Ave. • V«. ■cack 
RES0RTS fiCAILINO.LTD. 



SBA Answer Desk 



The Small Business 
Administration (SBA) 
recently installed a toll 
free telephone number for 
its small business and in- 
formation and referral 
service. 

Experts from SBA's Of- 
fice of Advocacy will be 
staffing the "Answer 



Desk" telephones from 
8:30 am to 6:00 pm Mon^ 
days through Fridays. 
They arc prepared to han- 
dle questions from small 
business executives 
needing help with the 
complexities of dealing 
with the goverrunent. 

Call toll free 800-368- 
585S for this new service. 



I I I I I I I 



HOMEOWNERS - REALTORS I 

SECOND : 

j MORTGAGE LOANS \ 




Home Improvements /Put chases 
Bill Consolidation 
Business Investment 
Amortized or Balloon Pnymijnts 
Loan;, Up to 52^0.000 ,1^' : 



(804)461-0909 



L» 



TT I 1 



I I 



Ha 



DON'T LOOK NOW, BUT 

YOUR MILLION-DOLLAR 

IRA NEST EGG HAS 

SHRUNK TO $316,000! 

Last year at this time Ameriouis were told they 
could become milUonaires by putting just 
$2,000 a year into an Individual Retirement 
Account. 

So a lot of them put their $2,000 into 
accounts at savings institutions that were 
promising to pay interest of 16^ or 17% a year. 

If reates had continued at that level for 30 years, 
millionaires they'd be. 

But in the past 12 months interest rates have 
fallen to about 9%. At that rate, in 30 years 
$2,000 a year will grow to less than $316,000. 

From $1 ,000,000 to $3 1 6,000 in one short year. 

We think it's unwise to tie your financial future 
to sranethingas unpredictable as interest rates. 
You're likely to do much better if you put 
your money into an investment that's proven its 
ability to give you supaior results over long 
periods of time and under ail kinds of conditions. 

That's why we recommend the American Funds 
Group, a family of mutual funds with objectives 
that meet a wide variety of financial goals. 

Anyone who made the mistake of listening 
to the siren song of high interest rates last year 
doesn't have to make the same mistake twice. 

Call or visit us today and let us show you the 
facts and figures that will help you decide where 
your nest egg has the best opportunity to grow. 

P.p. Box m,A 109 E. Main St. 

Va. Beach, VA 23451 Norfolk, VA 23510 

(804)428-0110 (804)625^281 

fifstSecimties 




GREAT milX.L m BattWidd BodevanJ SoutkOEtr CREEK; 1 124 Gewge Wfa*ii«ton Highway h4iwlh IVM )NDS CC^NT R :03C 

B«nWwU Boutevad N«th.GREENBRrER BartWidd Boulevaid it VolvoParkwavCHURC HI ANI> 335^ VMB»em Bran* Boules,^rd 

m Farm FmkSCXTTH MlLfTARY HKJHWAY 2005 Soi»h MiBtarv Ftahway, K Mart f entrr m Farm Fresh. 

LYNNIH AVEN 4SJ South Lyimhaven Rom, m Virginia Beach 

MFMBFRFnr 



rlbnns 
And Lower 

ManthlvP 



Morteage Options 



United Virginia Mortgage Corporation is pleased to <^r two new secwid mort- 
gage plans designed to fit today's budget. These innovative options combine 
longer terms with today's lower interest rates to offer substantially lower monthly 

payments. 

With our new 30/15 Secxmd Mortgage, monthly payments are based on a 
payback period of 30 years altfwu^ the actual loan term is 15 years. This n^ans 
low monthly payments with the remaining balance becoming due at tiie end (rf 
the 15 yrar paiod. \, 

Another q)tion is our 15 Year SeoMid Mortgage, witii monthly payments that 
are considerably lower than the tralitional 7-10 year secmd molgage. 

Add these long term advantages to tiodi^r's lower interest rates, and you have 

a second mortgage both flexible and affoidaUe. 

Be^ of all, there are no brtAo^s fees or piqjaymwit penalty ftff paying cff 

Hbe loan at an earlier time. 

So can us today to find out mane rfxwt tiiese exciting mw optioi^ Give us a 
second of your time, and well give you a second mortgage ctesigned to fit yoiff 
budget 

Ciall our office now at 

llwM flguTM am taMd on the 
munKMon rai bw Mw PBRnani 
wM tM du* wWrin Mrty ^Gg days 
Of macnHna ohm. 









Touch 


fwmM 


Mwunt 


179Monttily 


Final 


180 Monthly 


Percentt^ 


Financed 


r^ymenisOf 


F^ymwtt 


Ptrfimm 


FMi* 


$10,000 


$123.89 


$9,252.39 


$31,428.70 


14.75 


$15,000 


$185.83 


$13,881.72 


$47,145.29 


14.75 


$25,000 


$309.72 


$23,134.12 


$78,574.00 


14.75 


$5aooo 


$619.45 


$46,261.98 


$157,143.53 


14.75 



MortqagaLB i 

abla. nrwria moftdaga hiauranoa 
■ncCraia Inawanca raqiAad on 



*Raiai arid tamw tutfart 

4 m 11^ Mrt WW m kM^akxKA ^ J. I ,iim m 






QJI 



United Virginia 

Mortgage Corporaljon 
Ewtty Finmce IXi^ton 



461-9426 

2 K<^er Executive Center, Suilc 100 
Norfolk, VA 23502 



■■■■■I 



■■m 



^fmimm^^^ 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 13. 1983 1 1 



The Woman's View 




Notes 
To 
My 
Friends 

ByJIMKINCAID 

June 9, 19&). 

Pla^arism. as any English studat knows, is the 
copying of someone dse's writing, and daiming of 
it as one's own; and it's a toriblc crime unong 
writers. 

So, I've always practiced a policy of giving 
credit when I swipe someoiw dse's lines, or 
thoughts, especially if there's a chance I'll be 
caught at it. 

But here's one for the book. 

Out in Eugene. Or^on, the professors of 
English at the University of Oregon, the 
publish 

Ctat in Eugene, Or^cm, the i^ofesiors of 
English at the University of Oregon published a 
handbook for students, one that includes a section 
on plagiarism. 

It's an elegant passage and details the enormity 
of this literary crime. And it was stolen, word for 
word, from the Stanford University handbook. 

This series of excerpts frcwn "Notes To My Frien- 
ds" is brought to you through the courtesy of The 
DonnlBg Company, a local publishing firm, and 
Jim Kincaid. The book <• available in most book 
stores. ^ ~ 




-Announcements- 



By CHUCK FAULKNER 



Embroidery, Presdug ■ Never i»ess an iron direc- 
tly onto the material. Always press embroidery 
from the reverse side. 

Eaamelwarc, Removiag Food Stidas - Use water 
with one Ublespoon of baking soda or one-half 
cup of white vinegar added. Boil for five minutes, 
then rinse thoroughly. 

Eaamelwarc, Strengthening • When new, put it in 
a large pot, cover with cold water, then bring it 
slowly to a boil over low heat. Remove from heat 
and let the water cool. This vrill give it twice the 
normal life. 

Enanelware, White. Removliig Stains • Put the 
stained enamelware in a pot of eqUal parU of 
white vinegar and cold water. Add a tablespoon 
of baking soda, then, over medium hear, bring to 
a boil. Boil hard for five minutes, then allow to 
cool. They'll be as white as snow. 
Envelopes - If the glue fails to work, try a few 
drops of any nail polish. It sets Uke cement. 
Epoxy Glue, Removing - Soak a soft white cloth in 
lacquer thinner. Place it on the glue for thirty 
seconds to soften it, then wipe it off. 

Chuck Faulkner is brought to you through the 
courtesy of The Donoing Company, a local 
publishing firm, and Chuck faukner. The book is 
available in most book stores. 





Opening Of 
C&T Pet Shop 



P.T.A. News - The monthly meeting of the G.A. 
Treaklc Elementary P.T.A. will be held on Mon- 
day, April 11th at 7:30 p.m. in the school caf- 
terioum. The achool is located at 2^ Gihnerton 
Road, Chesapeake, The title of the fHrogram is 
The Many Faccto of Scho<rf Life - "SUde 
Program". 

Green Meadow Point Gardc0 ChA Mcctli^ Mrs. 
B.F. Taylor of the Westwood Garden Glub will 
present a sUde program on "Wildflowers of 
Tidewater" at the A^ 19 meeting of the Green 
Meadow Pmnt Garden Club. Tbe meeting will be 
held at thelrome of Mrs. R.P. Turner with Mrs. 
R.D. Leonard serving as co-hostess. The meeting 
begins at 7:30 p.m. The club's annual Yard-of-the 
Month contest b^ins this month. 
Wcsteni BnuKb Higk School PTA Meetiiv - The 

Western Branch High School PTA wiU hold a 
brief business meeting on Tuesday, April 26 at 
7:45 p.m. in the auditorium. The Band will 
present their "Spring CoMert" at 8 p.m. 
The Golden ThtaMe Nccdiccraft GidM wiU hold 
its Tenth Annual Needlework Show wi Saturday, 
April 16 from 10:00 a-m. to 5K» p.m. and Sunday 
April 17 from 12:00 noon to 4:00 p.m. at Ham- 
pton aty Hall, 22 Lincoln Street, Hamp^>n. 
Admission is free and the puWic is invited to at- 
tend. 



J 




Beauty 
Unlimited. .. 

By PATRICIA DAVIS 



QUESTION: My lips arc very chapped from the 
winter months. What lipstick colors can 1 wear to 
minimize this dryness? 

ANSWER: If your lips are not smooth - stay away 
from frosted colors as that only draws attention to 
the dryness and lines. Go with creamy colors and 
add a dash of lip gloss to add more moisture to the 
lips. 



•GIVE YOUR MOUTH PERSONAUTY COLOR. CURVE 



First shapt ouflin* wilh a brush. Vlaul bs • pro " no bmell you 
toibw my favorite brtncmg act - luil lw«) your iiWiyw «*^ 
handad accuracy. Do orie sda ai i uma. top tplM- And look al 

.i„„~_. bw • lMl> .Linhl nl h«nri m f f diM a ihaolno! 



nanoao accuracy- u« ""■ •«" ■* • ""■"•. '""^^L^T 
dwgrams lor a MSa tlsigM-ol-h««d oorractoM shaping! 



my 




TMNUPS 
OmrouMine/usr 
aaidiinaiura/lpiina. 
WinmeilgMorpmly 



FUULIPS 

Draw ibit /uar Iwilt 
rMuiwl to Una. K in 
>mamp»rstmd» 
Stnmn comtn by 
stoopinoiun short 
oHhf 



UNEVEN MOOTH 

Abk As f>* you «ks 
ban ahtimihe other 
onaummch. 



TIPS ON CHOOSING YOUR LIP COLORS: 

Small lips wear lighter colors - stay away from 
dark colors as this will make lips appear even 
smaller. Fuller lips wear darker colors - this will 
minimize and make lips appear smaller. 

Write or call in your 
questions on Skin Care or 
Makeu^o: 

Patricia DavU 
Janaf Office Building 

Suite 320 

Norfolk, Virginia, 23502 

Phone: 466-166S 



C&T Pet Shop 

Announces 
It's 

GRAND OPENING 

Saturday, April 16th 
at 12:30 

FREE Goldfish Given to 
First 20 Customers 






Visit Us 

at 

1904 S. Battlefield Blvd. 

421-2615 




{^^^td^nM^ eft U 

also. HL 4c'^*' ^ . 




B.B. FULK 

OPTICAL COMPANY 

OPEN SATURDAYS 
9 AM Til 1PM 



• STORE FRONT PARKING 

• NEW PRESCRIPTIONS HLLED 

• GLASSES DUPLICATED 

• EMERGENCY REPAIRS 

• PERSONAL SERVICE 

5847-B Poplar Hail Dr. 
Norfolk, Virginia 23502 

(beside Military Circle-across from L^^tU). 



Space And 
Decoration 

Maximum use of space 
and clever decoration 
treatments characterize 
the interior of the home. 
The livingroom, kitchern 
and diningroom are 
(ksigned to read as one 
with furniture placement 
used for functional 
definitions. Cathedral 
ceiling, sliding patio doors 
framed by a specially 
designed upholstered lam- 
brequin make the area 
more spacious. 




There's a new pet shop 
in town located on South 
Battlefield Blvd. called 
C&T Pet Shop. It's a 
family owned operation 
that started simply 
because the owners had 
such a love and desire for 
pets. 

The owners, Francene 
Krause and David Hoyt 
expanded their business 
from their home because it 
was getting relatively large 
and it has been their secret 
desire to own a pet shop. 

To get things rolling 
they are planning a gala 
affair Saturday April 16th 
at 12:30. Festivities in- 
clude the cutting of a rib- 
bon by Mayor Sidney 
Oman, WQZQ broad- 
casting live and giving 
away prizes. Also The 



r: 



Chamber of Commerce, 
City Council and Sheriff 
Department will send 
representatives to attend 
the affair. 

Along with the prizes 
the radio station will give 
away, Francene and David 
will give away tickets to 
Metro Park for those who 
ask for them. Also they 
will hold a drawing for 
two pair of Dr. Scholl 
sandijs. 

"We expect several 
hundred people to attend 
and we're excited about 
the publicity and 
coverage," says Francene 
and David. 

J For those who plan to 
nop by and visit Francene 
and David, expect to And 
warm people who love 

animaU, 






mn YWR CARPETS 
AMmiNiTUIIE 

lY mOllSSIOIIAlS 





Endorsed by furnishings 
manufacturers, 
the Duraclean 
Foam-Absorption 
Process gets 
the dirt out 
that the other 
methods leave in! 




takts the soil OUT 1 

Safest for fabrics and 
fibers. Watch colors 
and textures spring 
back to life It's all 
done in your home . . 
ready for guests the 
same day. 



Calf wtor a fr— QuottVon 
Flower Fresh Carpet and Furniture Cleaning 

Duraclean-Burton Specialists 
487-7M1 Chesapeake 



Exercise & Aerobics 

V^laaaCs of Dance As Seen On 

9:30 AM 

5© > "^ Cox Cable U 

" I -* 




461-3515 

RXOptkian 
Bev Fulk 



Magnifiers 

Ray-Ban Hour*: Mon-Ffi 9-5:30 

Sunglasses Sat 9-1 

, (No \ppmntmaA NeccMary) 




Which Do You Prefer? 



Nutri'Metia 

"SUM Can A CatmHkt " 

Made From 
VITAi^INS 




PROTEINS 



Other Cosmetics 
Made From 
)hol 




C&CQl^ttls 

Fonnaldahyde 



**Compamentary'*skin analysb A 
make^tp s^on in ymw h^ntm^ 



Let our e3q>mrOh^yw took 
yow1mt**Niaiua»y'* 

C^4li6-ldM Today 

F V Ymir As^nMmmi 



/■aIic .A'lduis 



We have styling chokes 

for everyone and for 

tUlages! 



•5.70 mMm OpwMMly 

9-fTlMnwbQ' 




ITME-UMtOwkM. Oil 



m%\ 



mi 



mni 



nifV.anckl 

en-9t9 



3mmm 



iAtYMV< 






SALE 

m% ®^ 

six selected mouldings 

PICTURE FRAME 
FACTORY OUTLET 



Ivy Slwwroom 

1224 Harris Straet 

OttftotlMvilta. Va. 

29ft«ia 

Mon-Sal 105 



Ivy Showroom 

2%1 Vs. BMCti Blvd. 

Vs. B4K*!, Va. 

Mof»-Fri 10« ^l 10^ 




10% IMsccmnt to 

AllMemboi 

At 

I^UKX Related, Inc 

HiUt<q> Square 

44 Classes 
A Month 



/- 



Two Locations 



SMFInlCoioalalM. 

Hilltop 
42^6828 



amj— j ioffMM. 

ThaUa 
486-2M3 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, Apiil 13, 1983 



Entertainment & Dining 



li ii. f '•. i|^$p Mf^ mw 



CEDAR COVE INN 



Please Call For 

RESERVATIONS 

on Friday, Saturday 

and Sunday 



100 Fernwood Farm Road 

547-3022 

11 am to 11 pm 



r 



Banquet Room 
For Fifty 



Chesapeake's Elegant 
Cedar Cove Opening 
Big Success! 

The Official Grand Opening of the Cedar 
Cove Restaurant in Chesapeake was a gala affair 
attended by about 130 people. It was a resoun- 
ding success and comments from those in atten- 
dance iilcluded "the best thing to happen to 
Chesapeake in years." The overwhelming con- 
census was "it's a great place to eat and have fun 
in Chesapeake." 




■Announcements- 



Crab Pot Restaurant and Casbah Lounge- 
Appearing April 15th and 16th in The Casbah 
Lounge "The Click" 

House of Windsor-Mon.-Fri. Daily Luncheon 
Buffet all you can ear for $3.25. Mon.-Thurs. 
Dinner Buffet served 4:30 to 9 am at $4.95 



Grand Opening 

Friday and Saturday 

The New House 
of Windsor Rib House 

New Specializing in BBQ Ribs 



Monday through Friday Daily Luncheon Buffet 

All you can eat for only $3.25 

Mbnday through Thursday Dinner Buffet 

Served 4:30 til 9 pm at $4.95 

Fabulous Sunday Brunch 
Served 1 1 am til 5 pm at $3.95 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 




......—■Save »2.00 With This Coupon— -———"" 

PLUS FREE SALAD BAR 

With Any "All You Can Eat" Sit Down Buffet 



Fillet of Trout Golden Fried. ........ *4.95 

Fried Chicken Crispy *4.95 

Fried Fillet of Flounder 

Hometown Favorite *5.95 

Fried Clam Strips Tender *7.95 

Fried Deviled Crab In Natural Shell *8.9S 
Fresh Fried Oysters In Season Select. »9.95 
Fried Shrimp Golden *9.95 



Rib Lovcn, Thb ii ill Thcae temicr deildous rilM are coated 
with oar homemade nuMC. Try 'em once and yon'll be 
believer. 

BBQ Baby Back Ribs *10.95 

Crab Cakes Our Own Homemade 

Maryland Style •10.95 

Spiced Shrimp Peel 'em yourself. 

Hot or cold *11.95 

Deep Sea Scallops if you like fried 
Scallops, this is it *12.95 



(You may reorder 2 or 3 of any other buffet items of equal or less value than your original order, Reorders 
will be served only for customers placing the original order - Thank you. 

6149 Va. Beach Blvd. 2406 E. Little Creek Road, Norfolk • 583-3793 3960 Turnpike Rd. 
Norfolk OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Portsmouth 

AA%.titXA 0^«M«m.-Thiin.4:3«-li»/S«B.lM:J» Fri. * Sat. 12-9 399-5S38 

..«!'«»— —-Save *2.00 With This Coupon......—-—-— 



Also serving N. Y. Strip Steak 

with Baked Potatoe/Salad Bar for 

only $4.95 



Banquet Facilities A vailabie 

FREE Door Prize Drawing Held 

Saturday, April 16th 






S671 Vki^ia Icadi Blvd. 

Norfolk, vkgiria jfjg yvew House of 




MTASTIC 



BUtbaor 



Have A Nice Day 



RESTAUHANT 
Telephoiw: 461-OOOS 

Ood Bless You 









fitfjiA Lounge 

Tfy Vfrgiaias fmsi 
in Coun^ Dining 
arui Dancing 






Live EnUriainmen* ^ 
r^'^TKcV/fangferBand" 



(•■(■ 

• • 

U 






STs SOUTH i^«ym t>K>rtj. 






Saaday- Wrangler Gong Sh<i|£,'lst prize 150.00 
Monday- Closed 

Tuesday-Ladies Nitc • Happy Hour All Nite for Ladies 
WcdncMlay-Mens Nite • Happy Hour All Nitc 
Tight Jeans Contest, 1st prize $50.00 
(for Cowgirls) 
Thursday- Wrangler Rib Special • Bring a Friend 

2 for 1 $6.95 
Friday-Steamed Shrimp Special 15.95 

Vz lb. in spicey beer broth 
Saturday- Wrangler Steak Special $4.95 
Juicy N. Y. Strip cooked to order 



FAMILY DAY 
EVERY SUNDAY 

QUEEN CUT 

PRIME RIB 



ONLY 



4.95 



r 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 




■1 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Buy any Entree at Regular Price And 

Get The Second Of Equal Value 

Or Less Absolutely 

r K££ With this Coupon. 



ExpiresMay 1,1983 



I 

1 



I WITH SALAD & POTATO 
I 



• 



Enjoy Your Sunday 

And Relax. 

Let Us Serve You, 

FOR THE KIDS: 

A HOT DIGGUY DOG 

OR HAMBURGER 

^FRENCH FRIES « A COKE 

ONLr.99C^ 

And Don't Forget 
i Our Catering And 

L Banquet Facilities. 

^^»^^ ^B^ ^^ •^i^ ^B* ^*» '^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^ 



4621N.WitchduckRd. 
Vii^nia Beach 

490-0581 



FANTASTIC 
nNWKXS 



RED 
LOKTES 



mmKHMfKX.\ 




-Announcements. 



Appearing at Fantastic Fenwicks "States" on 
April 18. 

At the Circle. Restaurant every Wed., Thurs., Fri. 
6pm-9: 30pm Ray Brown at the piano 




' Seafood ReataurarU 
Specializing in Sof tsliell & Steamed Crabs 

Friday & Saturday Night 
Specials 

ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET 

at 

$9.95 per person 



BUFFET 

Steamsliip Round*Com Muffins 

Steamed Slirimp*Qams 

Crab Lep*Cole Slaw 

Broiled Trout«Potatoe Salad 

Sbrimp Creole 



R^ular Mtmi Available for 
Lunch and Dtimer 

Live Entertainment 
Fri^y and Saturday Nights 



2314 Beauregard St. 

(Comer of Ankt G«r4ei«lcwtl'i PoM RoiiA) 

CaU: 853-2672 



What's Cooking At 
The Circle? 



1" NEW YORK 
SIRLOIN STEAK 

•14" 

The best quality 
steak in Tidewater 



UVE MAINE 
LOBSTER 

•10»» 

IV^ lb. stuffed with 
jumbo aab meat 



Early Bird Specials- 



•Om Lane Crab Cake *5** 

•Fried Scallopf *6>* 

•^Btecd didtea Ltvcn *4*» 

•Fried or Broiled Tnwt %** 



L UNCHE ON 
BUFFET 



*3>* Tociday-^tBrday 



Fan llMb Served*!*^ aa-2 |m 
Toca^ tea S«tarteyK3oied M»day 



^GHTLY ENnaiTAINMENT 
Ray ftrowB At The PiaiM 





UCD 



3010 lUtli Street 
Portemmitt 




3Sr7-8196 



ii iiiiiniiiiiini'iimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimjt. 



■p^ 



Virgiflia Beach Sun, April 13. 1983 13 



'f New Program 



When Kids Help Kids With Problems 



By Mike Gooding 

"He tdd me he wanted 
to commit suicide," 
recallni Judy Bird, a IS 
year-old ninth grader at 
Independence Junior High 
School. "I just let him 
talk. He needed to have 
someone listen to him." 

"I've handled two fit- 
tempted suicides," said 
Lara White, a 14 year-old 
ninth grader at the school. 
"I know I'm ultimately 
not responsible if these 
people live or die. but the 
idea that they might not be 
around school on Monday 
morning is pretty scarey." 
Bird and White convin- 
ced their friends not to 
follow through on their 
suicide threats. Their suc- 
cess, they say, can be 
traced to a school 
program called "peer 
counseling," for which 
they volunteered several 
months ago. 

The project was 
initiated jointly by Josie 
Collier, head guidance 
counselor at Indepen- 
dence; Lynne Coates, a 
learning disabilities 
resource teacher at the 
school; and Judy Will, a 
mental health nurse for 
the City of Virginia Beach 
Mental Health and Mental 
Aetardation department's 
Comprehensive Mental 
Health unit. 

Adolescence, according 
to Collier, is a very dif- 
ficult period in a young 
person's life. "He or she is 
really confused by the 
changes going on inside of 
him, and the whole thing 
is magnified by incredible 
peer pressure," she said. 
"We know that there are 
some things kids won't 
talk to adults about, but 
they will talk to other 
kids. That's where the 
idica for peer counseling 
came in. 

The peer counseUag^» 
program at Independeiioe,' 
the only one in Virginia 



Beach's 62 public schools, 
is patterned aftn a similar 
and very successful 
program in Palo Alto, 
California. When the idea 
first surf«:ed last year to 
launch a similar program 
at Independence, the aim 
was to curb what Coates 
called "a serious drug 
IM-oblem" at the school. 
"Since then, though," she 
said, "we've found there 
are many problems other 
than drug-related ones 
that this program can 
help." 

KidfHelplBgKids 



The 10 students who 
volunteered to participate 
in the classmate coun- 
seling program, say there 
are many different reasons 
for beconung peer coun- 
selors. 

"I wanted to help other 
people" said Danielle 
Strohecker, a 14 year-old 
ninth grader. "I don't like 
to just sit back and watch 
other people with 
problems. Also, I was very 
interested in learning 
listening skills. 

"I can start solving my 
own problems now as a 
result of what I've lear- 
ned," she continued. "I 
don't just run into my 
room now, slam the door, 
and cry myself to sleep. 
Instead, I analyze my 
problems. 

"I've been able to help 
some of my friends get 
over boyfriends," said 
Christina Champagne, a 
14 year-old ninth grader. 
"I became a peer coun- 
selor because I thought I 
might be able to help 
m^elf with some of the 
difficulties I was having. 
Also, I look at this as a 
step towards a potential 
career, maybe as a 
psychiatrist." 
"I was having a lot of 

mobtfms in °>y ''^^ 
■wyielf," said Rodel 
Catahan, a 12 year-old 



seventh grader. "I didn't 
know what to do with my 
future or who I should 
hang around with. 

"My friends have a 
whole lot of problems," 
Catahan continued. "I 
had one guy who was pret- 
ty heavily into dru^. I 
would see him, and then a 
week later he looked pret- 
ty bad. I didn't know how 
to help him. Now, I would 
know how to help him." 
"You wouldn't think 
that kids at the junior high 
level have important 
problems," said Richard 
Copley, a 15 year-old nin- 
th grader. "But, they 
really do have problems. 
This is a prc^am that 
reaUy lets you fmd out 
about people." 

"This projpam has been 
instrumental in helping me 
understand people," said 
Andrew Greenberg, a IS 
year-old ninth grader. "I 
can now look at people 
and understand what they 
arc really saying under- 
neath what they are saying 
on the surface. This 
program has helped me 
see people for what they 
really are." 

"I think that some day, 
this program is going to 
help a lot of people; it is 
already helping me," said 
Chris Seabron, a IS year- 
old ninth grader. "The 
program is helping me to 
show my real feelings in- 
stead of keeping them bot- 
tled up inside. Also, I've 
been able to help friends 
in trouble like one guy 
who smokes grass. I told 
him, 'You're smoking too 
much.' He has since cut 
down." 

"I had a friend who was 
pretty messed up on drugs 
and I just wanted to help 
her," said Christina Hor- 
nsby, 15, a ninth grader. 
"By getting into this 
program andlearning how 
to help people like my 
friend it has helped me, 
because I've learned how 



not to become hysterical 
over every little thing." 

Gary Matthews, a 
seventh grader, was the 
only participant of the 
program who was unavail- 
able for comment. 

One problem of the 
program, according to 
Collier, is that all of the 
students presently in- 
volved will not be retur- 
ning to Independence next 
fall. Ninth graders will, of 
course, move on to high 
schools. Because of re- 
districting, the two seven- 
th grade students in the 
program will be sent to 
other schools as well. 
"We're going to have to 
start over from scratch I 
guess," said Collier. 
Several of the students 
said they planned to con- 
tinue peer counseling in 
their new schools in the 
faU. 
Collier, Coates and Will 



hope to expand the 
program into other 
schools in the future. 
"There is definitely a need 
for it." said Will. "The 
main benefits of the 
program are the building 
of self-estMm, listening 
skills, analytical skills, 
and insight into the 
human condition," for 
the counselors. 

The ultimate success of 
the program is based upon 
their listening skills. Will 
added. "They can't find 
the answers for these 
people; they have to find 
answers for themselves," 
she said. 

"The role of the peer 
counselor is to Ifsten and 
to help people explore op- 
tions and make their own 
decisions about things." 

Under Will's direction, 
each of the students has 
undergone about 26 hours 
of counseling training. 



Crows Flock To Beach 



About 2,000 electronic 
warfare specialists known 
as the Association of Old 
Crows will flock to 
Virginia Beach this fall for 
an international conven- 
tion. 

The group, with 15,500 
members in the United 
Sutes and in 43 foreign 
countries, works for the 
advancement of electronic 
warfare with the 
cooperation of the U.S. 
Department of Defense. 
The membership includes, 
scientists, engineers, 
managers, operators, 
educators and military 
personnel, who comprise 
60 percent of the 
association. 

They are coming to 
Virginia Beach for their, 
20th annual convention, 
the first east coast conven- 
tion they've held outside 
of Washington, D.C. In 
past years, the association 



has met in cities such as 
San Francisco, Sm An- 
tonio, Dallas and Las 
Vegas. 

The Old Crows will 
spend the majority of their 
stay, from Oct. 31 to Nov. 
3, at the Pavilion conven- 
tion center, although some 
symposiums and work- 
shops will take place at the 
Cavalier Hotel and at the 
Virginia Beach Civic Cen- 
ter. Also scheduled are 
golf and tennis tour- 
naments. About two- 
thirds of the group's 
meetinp will be closed to 
the public and press, 
however, because of the 
secretive nature of the 
organization's work. 

More than 100 
exhibitors of electronic 
warfare devices will be in 
atttndance. Much of what 
these vendors have to 
dkplay is not for public 
coiuumption, either, and 




, ae^^&me our TO ASSIST 




Bring Free DA V Service 

To Veterans and their Families 

Veterans and their familin in 
cities and towns across America 
are taking advantage of the free 
counseling and claims filing 
service provided by the Disabled 
American Veterans (DAV) Field 
Service Unit program. One of 
these mobile offices, manned by 
a DAV veterans' benefits expert, 
will be located at DAV Chaper 
Home, Craddock Chapter Hh 
72 Af ton Parkway in 
Portsmouth on April 26. 
National Commonicatioiis Dept. 
DAV Nattonal Headquarters 
P.O. Box 14301 
Qiicinnati, OH 45214 

(606)441-7300 



r 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



20 words or less - $4.40. Additional words - 22« each. 
Please print clearly using one word per box. 



OUNCE O'GOLD 




Counselors include Julie Bird, Christina Hornsby, Lara White, Danielle 
Strohecker, Christina Champagne, Rodel Catahan, Richard Copley, Andrew 
Greenburg, and Chris Seabron. Teacher is Lynne Coates, learning disabilities 
resources, and also debate coach 

/ ■ ■ - 




Old CrQw President, far right, is David Vigil. 



will, therefore, be shown 
under tight security at area 
military installations. 

"We had a lot off 
problems last year in San 
Francisco with 

peaceniks," said David 
Vigil, senior operations 
manager of SYSCON 
engineering consulting 
firm and 1983 convention 
chairman, explaining the 
tight security measures. 

Vigil said Virginia 
Beach and Tidewater were 
a natural choice for 
location of the 
organization's annual 
meeting. "We are in the 
center of what is probably 
the largest user com- 
munity of electronic war- 
fare of any other area in 
the United States, con- 
sidering the presence of 
the Navy, Army, Air For- 
ce and NATO here," he 
said. 

Vigil added that this 
year's convention could 
prove to be beneficial to 
the city of Virginia Beach. 
"This could be a gold 



mine of an opportunity 
for companies who will be 
represented as exhibitors 



to get a look at Virginia 
Beach and see what this 
city has to offer," he said. 



Wedeyan Team Captains 



Five business and 
professional leaders have 
been named team captains 
for Virginia Beach in tlw 
spring campaign for the 
Friends of Virginia 
Wesleyan College Annual 
Fund, according to 
Virginia Beach area 
chairman William J. 
Jones, Atlantic X-Ray 
Service, Inc. 

The team leaders are: 
John J. Bailey Jr., In- 
surance Consultants, Inc.; 



Larry W. Bell, Willis 
Wayside, Inc.; Frank R. 
Gilmore, Virginia 
National Bank; Edwin C. 
Kellam Jr., Kellam-Eaton 
Insurance Agency, Inc.; 
and Frank Clements, 
Virginia B«ich Bank of 
Commerce. 

The goal for the 
"Friends" program 
during the fiscal year ai- 
ding June 30, 1983, is 
$290,000, including 
$90,000 for new scholar- 
ships. 










































4.40 


4.62 


4.84 


5.06 


S.28 


5.50 


5.72 


5.94 


6.16 


6.J8 


6.«) 



Please run ad for — 

Mail to: 

Byerly Publications 

P.O. BOX 1527 

Chesapeake, va. 23320 



Issues, or until cancelled ( K 
Cost of single ad S 



Number times to run 
Amount enclosed $ _ 



Name 

Address 
city. 



r 




h 



.State. 



jsp. 



Yourteiertionenunit»r — — 

itaSHeDAlJSmJIilMTMECHiSAPWIffi POST WOTHEVRCMA BEACH SUN. 

Biw fciB Mfitii your cM»sWed ad. j^ase ^« 547-4S71. 



COME SEE WHAT'S 
UNDER OUR RAINROW 

Tidewater' Leading Gold Merchants 
are Pleased to Announce the addition of 

DIAMOBTD'S 

to our 14k Line 



Make us your last stop 
for Diamond Merchandise 



HE WILL NOT BE 
UNDERSOLD 

OUNCE O^GOLD 



JnycM't BaM|v«tlMll TovrMy 

The Virginia Beach Jaycee's and Miller Lite is 
sponsoring a three day Racquetball Tournament, 
April 22, 23 and 24. 

This event wiU be hosted by the "Cardinal 
Court Club." 

Entry forms for all participanU can be acquired 
at "Dixie Sporting Goods" on Kempsville Road 
of the "Cardinal Court Club." Entry deadUne is 
April 18. 

Tee-shirts will be given to all participants of this 

event. 

Trophies will be awarded to first, second and 
third place winners in the mens and womens 
divisiofis. 

A party will be held on Saturday, April 23 for 
all participants involved in thb Tournament . 

All proceeds help Jaycees Support Community 
Development. 

The public is invited. 



r 







• amOMWmKAVAIUBlE 

• E LOCALLY OWNED 



• OOLD SOLD BY WEIGHT 

• COMPLETE REPAIR DEVICE 

iUUJ.-420-S9S2 



CnatsnandproducmofquaHty, hwcott 

OFFSET NEWSPAPERS 
AndCIKCULARS 



Cmi^t»emfi99him 



BYEnYPVBUCATHm 



en 627^20 F*r 



«■ 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, Apr! 13, 1983 



Virsinia Beach Public Notices 



PmHc HMrins 


raMICIIMiWB 



Puklie Hftriiif 



hibiie NMrinf 




NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC 
The Commission of Game and Inland Fisheries has ordered to be 
published, pursuant to Sections 29-123, 29-126, and 29-127 of the 
Code of Virginia, the following proposed changes in Commission 
regulations applicable Statewide. A public hearing on the advisability 
of adopting, or amending and adopting, each of the proposed 
changes, or any part thereof, will be held at the Holiday Inn- 
Midtown, 32CO W. Broad Street, Richmond, Virginia, beginning at 
9:30 a.m. on April 29, 1983, at which any interested citizen present 
shall be heard. If the Commission is satisHed that proposed changes in 
lis regulalions. or any parts (hereof, are advisable, in the form in 
which published or as amended as a result of the public hearing, the 
( omniis^ion ninv adopt each siH'h prn|KiMil, acting upon the 
piopoMiN M'|iiuiilrlv in in lilmk. 

I'AK I II. UAMl. 
CHAPTER 2. In General. 
Amend Kegulaiion R2-5 (a) to read as follows: 

II shall be unlawful to hunt with a dog or gun or have in possession 
a sirung bow, or a gun which is not unloaded and ca.<ied or dismantled, 
iM iliv naiiciiial forcsls and on Commission-owned lands and on lands 
inariagcd by I he Commission under cooperative agreement except 
during the period when it is lawful to hum bear, deer, grouse, 
pheasant, quail, rabbit, raccoon, squirrel, turkey, waterfowl in all 
cuuniies west of (he Blue Ridge Mountains and migratory game birds 



Subject 
Wanted 
ByPolice 

The Virginia Beach 
Crime Solvers program is 
seeking information on 
one man, Norman Brick- 
house, who is wanted in 
connection with crimes 
committed in Virginia 
Beach. If a tip leads to the 
apprehension, Crime 
Solvers will pay up to 
$1,000 in cash. 

Brickhouse, 27, is a 
black male with black hair 
and brown eyes, 6*1" tall 
and 180 pounds. He is 
wanted for the Feb. 5, 
1983 armed robbery of the 
Medco Drug Store in the 
800 block of Baker Road. 

Anyone who has infor- 
mation about this man or 
any other wanted person 




Brickhouse 



can call Crime Solvers at 
427-0000. Crime Solvers 
will pay cash rewards up 
to $1,000 for information 
about any crime, or for in- 
formation leading to the 
recovery of stolen proper- 
ty or confiscation of 
illegal drugs. 

Callers are never asked 
to give their names to 
collect the rewards. 




The Virginia Beach Crime Solvers program is 
seeking information about a rash of 22 unsdved rob- 
beries that have occurred in Virginia Beach between 
Jan. 19, and March 15, 1983. Of these, nine appeared to 
have been committed by the same person. The robber 
generally enters through the front door, walks to the 
counter and, with 12" to 18" sawed off shotgun or flint 
lock type pistol with wood grips tucked by his side, robs 

the clerk. , . .• 

The robber has been described as a black male in his 
later twenties or early thirties. 5' 9" to 5' 10" tall, 160 to 
170 pounds. He has black hair, brown eyes, and a small 
mustache. In most of these robberies he wore a dark 
blue hooded sweatshirt, faded blue jean pants and 
boots. During each robbery, the hood of the sweatshirt 
was pulled up or a knit cap was worn. 

This man is thought to be responsible for the 
foUowing robberies: Taco Bell - Princess Anne Rd.; ITT 
Bakery -Booney Rd.; Seashore Motel - Laskin Rd.; Miss 
Quick - Lynnhaven Rd.; Econo Lodge - Bonney Rd.; 
Best Western Motel - Northampton Blvd.; Arby s 
ResUurant - Virginia Beach Blvd.; Econo Lodge - Shore 
Dr ; and Kentucky Fried Chicken - Princess Anne Rd. 

Crime Solvers asks that anyone with information 
about these or any other robbery call Crime Solvers at 
427-0000, and you wiU be eUgible for up to $1,000 cash 
reward if an arrest is made. 

Crime Solvers also pays cash for mformation about 
any crime, wanted person, or the recovery of drugs or 
stolen property. You never have to give your name to 
collect the rewards. 

Thalia Burglary Info Wanted 

The Virginia Beach Crime Sdvers ptogt&m is 
offering a cash reward of up to $1000 fw infcwmaticm 
about 14 burglaries that were ojmmitted between Jan. 
7, and March 24 in the Thalia Area. 

The burglaries occurred on seven streets. The 
hardest hit was South Budding Avenue where eight 
burglaries took place. One burglary occurred on each of 
the following streets: Thames I>ive, South Palm 
Avenue, Wahales Drive, Thalia Tra<» Drive, Lochness 
Court, and Mongcliff Court. 

The most conmuxi means of entry has been prying 
open the rear sliding patio door. 

Items that were taken valued at more than $8,000 and 
included jewelry, television seu, stereos, cassette 
tapes, a camera, sewing machine, money, one shotgun . 
and one rifle. 

Anyone with information about these Thalia burglar- 
ies or others may call Qime Sdvers at 427-0000. If an 
arrest is made. Crime Sdvers will pay Tj) to $1,000 in 
cash. Rewards are also paid fa informatics about the 
locatJOT of stden property, wanted people, drugs ch- any 
crime canmitted in Virginia Beach. 

Callers are not required to give their names to cdlect 
the rewards. 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

in all counties east of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The provisions of Virginia: 

this subseclion shall no( prohibit the establishment and operation of _. ,™,i„, »...«:«> r^t *u» /-•;»., r^ft,,„rii r.f viminia 

archery and sho«..ing ranges on national fores! lands for the purpoK P^ regular meeting of the City CounClI of Virginia 

of sighting in riHcs and general shooting wKhiii established and iden- Beach Will be heard in the Council Chambers of the 

lified range boundaries. The use of firearms and bows in such M^et City Hall Building, Municipal Center, Priocess Anne 

during the closed hun(ing period will be resticted to the area within Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, April 25, 

established range boundaries. Such weapons shall be required to be j^gj ^^ 7:00 p.m. at which time the foUowing ap- 
unloaded and cased or dismantled in all areas other than wiUiin the ' -nvLu A. 

range boundaries. The use of firearms or bows during (he doMdhun- P"^"°')? *"' °* "^1™' -^v,,.,/-. ntcTDi/^-r 

ling period in such ranges shall be restricted to target practice only and CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

no birds or animals shall be molested. CLASSIFICATION: 

;•• LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

Add a new regutation to be numbered R2-8.5 to read « fo«o*»: i . An Ordinance upon Application of Robert W. Wad- 
It shall be unlawful to willfully molest, damage or remove any trap. . ,, -. _ T...-.1- o,f \/:,»!ni- n-«oK rtrtknn^iir 

or any lawfully caught bird or animal therefrom, or in any way diitur*. dell, M.D. Trustee of Virgima Bcach Orthopedic 

traps or snares legally set. Assoc., Inc. EmployM Proflt Sharing Plan for a 

CHAPTER 3. Bear. CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

Amend Regulation R3-I to read as follows: ,.,.,. CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to O- 

Exccpt as otherwise provided by local legislation and with the , r%fr:«_ rv:.«.:^t «„ «-,♦»;« «,o...^,.#., i,^atmA «« fh* 

specific «cep(ion« provided in the regulalions appearing in (hi. chap- 1 Office District on certain property located on he 

icr. ii shall be lawful lo huni hear from the fouriii Monday in Novem- South Side of Old Donation Parkway beginmng at a 

ber ihroiigh January .V hoih dates inclusive. point 1049.26 feet West of First Colonial Road, running 

a distance of 813.73 feet along the South side of Old 

^CnS'itJr SV:gSS."rr^^^ above, thelicen. Donation Parkway, running a distance of 744.19 feet in 

sec shall, wiihoui unnecessary delay, preseiiiihe lagged carcaM of hii a Southeasterly direction und running a distance ot 

kill to uii aiiihori/ed checking station or to an appropriate represen- 481.91 feet in a Northeasterly direction. Said parcel con- 

laiive i>f Ihe conimissioii in the county or adjoining county in which mj^j 4 jjjjrgs n,Ore Or leSS. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

the bear was killed. A( such time, the lag previously •''«h«; '0 (he ^ ^ Ordinance upon Application of BOSDIM and 
carcass shall be exchanged for an official game tag, which whall be ■. , ,-^uavi<->c /m:: -^z-vkitki/- ^»IOTDIr-^ 
furnishedby(heCommission, andsecurelyattachedtothecarcais. Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to R- 

Anieiid Kcgiiluiioii K3-A. I lo read as follows: g Residential District on certain property located on the 

Up..n killing a bear, any person exempt Iron. ITcense requitwnenl as j^ ^ j^ j ^ ^^ Lynnhaven Road beginning at a 

se issued pursuant to § 29-52 (3) shall, without unnecessary delay, CC of 438.65 feet along the North Side Ot South Lyn- 

present the carcass of his kill to an authorized checking station or to nhaven Road, running a distance of 744.08 feet along 

any appropriate represcniative of the Commission in the county or ad- ^^^^ Eastern property line, running a distance of 450.58 

joining county or adjoining county in which '»«: bear was kiiie^ At ^ ^^ Northern property line and running a 

such time, (he person shall be given an ofhcial game lag furnished by • ^ *" /^. „,„„„♦„ liVi. 

ihe Commission, which tag whall be securely ai.ached to the carcass. distance of 720.62 feet along the Western property line. 

CHAPTER 6. Deer. r -i* Said parcel contains 7.2 acres. LYNNHAVEN 

Amend REgulation R6-9(c) (o readas f^lows: ^ ,^ ,. BOROUGH^ ^, L. . _.,.,. 

■Upon killing a deer and tagging same, as provided above, ine ucen- 
see shall, without unnecessary delay, present the tagged carcass of his 
kill to an authorized checking station or to an appropriate represen- 
tative of the Commission in the county or adjoining county in which CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
ihc deer was killed. A( such (ime, Ihe lag previously allachcd to the viUMUAVPW RnPni lOH- 
carcass shall be exchanged for an Official game lag. which shall he J-'^I^NHAytN »^*^>J^"- . 

Lnnished by Ihe coininission. u.kI sixnrciy allachcd lo Ihc curcass. 3. An Ordinance upon Application of Virgima Beach 

Racquet Club NortU Associates for a CONDITIONAL 

Amend Regiilaiion R6-9. 1 lo read as follows: (jSE PERMIT for renovation and expansion of existing 

Upon killing a dc-er, any person exempt from licensr requirement as rggj^ational facilities tO include locker rOOms and grill 

prescribed in § 29-52 of (he Code of Virginia, or issued a complimcn- "cviwi"^'"" i«».mii« v« v v Th^ma. 

iary license as prescribed in § 29-80 or Ihe holder of a permanent licen- On certain property located On the ^t Side of ThomaS 

se issued pursuant lo § 29-52 (3) shall, wi(hou( unnecessary delay, Bishop Lane beginning at a point 560 feet morc or less 

present ihe carcass of his kill to an authorized checking station or to f^orth of Great Neck Road, running a distance of 760 

any appropriate represenlalive of (he Commission in Ihe county or ad- ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ j^^j ^j^^g j j,g g^^j jjjg ^f Thomas Bishop 
joining county in which the deer was killed. At such time, the person „,ntiina a Hictanr.. nf 1 10 fcM in a tniitheasterlv 

shall be given an official game tag furnished by the Commission, Unc, rumung a distance Of » ^0 fcetm a southeaster y 

which tag shall be securely attached to the carcass. direction, running a distance of 300 feet in an Easterly 

CIIAPTIRI5. Rahbii. direction, running a distance of 330 feet more or less in 

AinciidHeKiiiaiidnKi^-iioreudasioiiows: ^ Southerly direction, running a distance of 860 feet 

l.xce|)i as otherwise specifically providi-d in (he regulations ap- ^^^^ ^^ j^^ ^^^^^ Easterly direction, running a distance 

GX":S*r ;«';i'^»r;i,'ri'<i» ^ ""' of ^ f« »,„„ o, less ,„ a S<>u.hw«.e,ly dir^Uon and 

CHAPTER 17. Squirrel running a distance of 1030 feet more or less in a 

Regulation RI7-I1, setting the bag limit for squirtel, is hereby reaoin- WtfiSteriy direction. Said parcel COtttains 9.379 acres, 

ded. "'-• s LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

Regulation RI7-I7, seuing the bag limit for fox squirrel, is her^y 
rescinded. 

, SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

Add to thapter 17, following regulation R17-18, a new Article 3 en- LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 
titled "Bag Limit." 

Add a new reguiaiion to be numberedRP-i^ to read as" follows': 4. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 

The combined bag limit for all squirrels shall be six ■ day and seven- regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 

(y-five a license year in theaggr^ate. f^, Subdivision for Roy G. Farless and Richard W. Set- 

CHAPTER II. Turkey. ^er. Property located on the North side of Scott Bend 

"TThJltrrurS^lS'Si^e^luTy. only from April U Lane 200 feet West of Garcia Drive P^^^^^^ 

throuth May 12. 19M. both dates inclusive, and from Arpil 13 detailed information are available m the Department of 

through May 11. 1985, both dates inclusive, from one-half hour Planning. LYNfttlAVEN BOROUGH, 

before sunrise lo 1 1 o'clock a.m. Bearded turkeys may be hunted by 5, Appeal from TO:isions of Administrative Officers in 

calling. It shall be unlawful to use dogs or organized drives for Ihe yggaj-j {q certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 

purpoie of hunting. ^^ Subdivision for Delia Lee Barton. Property located 

Amend Reguiaiion RisU to read'as follows: on the South side of Old Virginia Beach Rad, 75 feet 

The bag limit for hunting turkeys shall be one a day and two a licen- £ast of Realty Avenue. Plats with more detailed infor- 

se year, either sex during the fall season. mation are available in the Department of Planning. 

Aineiul Kliguladon rIh-* M^orcuiu; foHo^s:' ' bJ^Si^^S;!Sl-,r^» 

Upon kilting a turkey and lagging same, us pi«»vldcd uU'vc, the VIRGINIA BtACH BUKUUtiM. 

licensee shall, without unnecessary delay, present (he tagged carcass uf 5. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 

his kill to an authorized checking station or to an appropriate fgggfd to certain dements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 

representative of the Commission in the county or adjoining county in «j„hdivi«ion for Mrs J James Davis PrODCrtV 

which the turkey was killed. At such time, the tag previously attached f*. subdivision lOr Mrs. J. james ^a^'*- ""P*"^ 

to the carcass shall be exchanged for an official game tag. which shall located at the Northwest corner of Pinewood Road and 

be furnished by the Commission, and securely attached to the carcau. Holladay Point. Pklts with more detailed information 

are available in the Department of Planning. 

Amend Regulation R18-6.1 to read as follows: VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

asXriS ' it127,S^^^TviX^^TssX•^! Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

plimentary license as prescribed in § 29-80 or the holder of a per- Department Of Planning. 

manent license issued pursuant to § 29-52 (3) shall, without un- All interested persons are invitred to attend. 

necessary delay, present the carcass of his kill to an authorized Ryth Hodges Smith 

checking station or to any appropriate representative of the Com- ^. /-.i-.u 

mission in the county or adjoining county in which the turkey was fMt^tTA/i-ivn 

killed. At such time, the person shall be ^ven an official game tag 193-12 ZT 4/13 VB 

furnished by the Commission, which lag shall be securely attached to 
Ihc carcass. 

CHAPTER 19. Waterfowl and Waterfowl Blinds. 

Amend Regulation RI9-2 lo read as follows: vioti/->c r^x: ui 101 m un a DiKir> 
A violation of federal statute or a regulation based thereunder as NOTICEOF PUBLIC HcAKINO 
relates to the taking, capturing, killing or attempting to take, capture The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will Con- 
or kill any migratory game bird shall tonstiiuie a violation of this juct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, April 20, 1983, at 
regulation. Provided, however it shall not be a vioiaiion of ihu 7 jq j^ ^^^ Council Chambers of the City HaU 

regu at on to shoot a crippled duck, goose or other migratory bird _ ., .T \. ■ . , >-. ^ i,- • • n u i/:.-:.:.. 

upon oepn public waters from a motorboat while it is being propelled BuUding, Mumcipal Center Virginia Beach, Virgima. 

by a motor, nor shall it be a violation of (his regulalion to hunt The Staff briefing will be at 6:45 p.m., in the Com- 

migratory waterfowl with lead shot anywhere within the Commtm- missioner of the Revenue's Conference Room, Room 

c^MMlsiff;,rSME:NlH^ »25. The following applications will appear on the 

George L. Sheppard, Jr., M.U.. t hahmaii agenda. 

195-5 IT 4/13 VB 



NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC 
The Commission of Game and Inland Fisheries has ordered to be 
published, pursuant to Scc(ions 29-125, 29-126, and 29-127 of the 
Code of Virginia, (he following proposed changes in ComnuiskNi 
regulalions applicable (o all couniiet Eas( of the Blue Ridge Moun- 
tains. A public hearing on (he advisability of adopting, or amending 
and adopting, each of the proposal chaise*, ot any part thereof, wiU 
be held ai ihe Holiday Inn-Midtown, 3200 W. Broad Street, Rich- 
mond, Virginia, beginning at 9:30 a.m. on April 29, IM(3, at which 
any interested citizen present shall be heard, if Ihe Commission is 
satisfied (ha( proposed changes in its reguladuns, or any par(s (hereof, 
are advisablie. in the form in which published or as amended as a result 
of the public hearing, the Commission may adopt each such proposal, 
acting upon the proposals separately or in block. 
CHAPTER 16. Raccoon. 
Amend Regulation RI6-2 (o read as follows: 

Except as otl^rwise sp^ifkally provided in (he rqiultions ap- 
pearing in this chapter, ii shall be lawful to chase raccoon with dogt, 
without capturing or takii^, in all counties east of the Blue Ridge 
Mountains from Augus( I through May 31, both dates inclusive. It 
shall be unlawful to have in immnliate possession a firMrm, box, axe, 
saw, or any three climbing (tevice whik hunting durii^ this ehne 
season. 

COMMISSION OF GAME AND INLAND FISHERIES 
Georae L. Sheppard, Jr., M.D.. Chairman 
195-4 IT 4/13 VB 



REGULAR AGENDA: 

1. F. H. and F. K. Reamy requests a variance to aUow 
parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot 76, Section 2, 
Lynnhaven Colony, 3121 Lynnhaven Drive. Lyimhaven 
Borough. 

2. Nick and Judy Cirillo requnts a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational equipment in front of a 
building instead of behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public street on Lot IQH, Section 
I-B, R^ MUl, 2188 i^ecroft Road. PriiKcss Anne 
Borough. 

3. Donald R. Smith rwjuests a variance to allow parking 
of major recreational equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest portion of a buikluig ui- 
jacent to a public street on Lot 373, Section III, Pan- 
broke Meadows, 800 St, James Drive. Bayside 
Borough. 

4. John W. Thornton requests a variance of 9 f^ to a 1 
foot side yard Mtback (east side) inst^ of 10 feet as 
require (acc^sory building) on Lot 7, Block A, OrMt 
Neck Manor, 2212 Harbor Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

5. Ikmd Beyer requott a variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot 



rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required (swim- 
ming pool) on Lot 11, Block C-C, Section 10. Lake 
Placid, 2440 Enchanted Forest Lane. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

6. Runnington Investment Corporation by Pandell 
Builders, Inc. requests a variance of 5 feet to a 65 foot 
building separation instead of 70 feet as required when 
principal structures are separated by a common ingress, 
egress and of 5 feet to a 15 foot side yard separation 
between buildings not separated by a common ingress, 
egress instead of 20 feet as required and of 12 feet to an 
8 foot setback from the south property line and of 15 
feet to a 5 foot setback from Laskin Road instead of 20 
feet each as required and of 5 feet to a 5 foot setback 
from the east property line instead of 10 feet as required 
(townhouse condominium project) on Lots A & D and 
property of W. B. Gallup, Birdneck Acres, 1221 and 
1233 Laskin Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

7. Hayden I. DuBay requests a variance of 2 feet in fen- 
ce height to a 6 foot fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required side yard adjacent to a street (Fen- 
tress Avenue) on Lots 1 and 33, Block 2, Chesapeake 
Beach, 4531 Pleasure House Avenue. Bayside Borough. 

8. William C. Burke, III requests a variance to park a 
commercial vehicle in excess of one (1) ton in a residen- 
tial or apartment district, where prohibited on Lot 27, 
Block B, Section 25A, Magic Hollow, 2904 Cardo 
Court . Princess Anne Borough . 

9. Mary W. (Gomez) Adams requests a variance of 40 
feet to a 10 foot setback from Discovery Crescent in- 
stead of 50 feet as requiml (through lot) and of 12 fwt 
to a 3 foot side yard setback (south side) instead of 15 
feet as required (pool, deck, steps and pump house) on 
Lots 8 and 9, Princess Anne Hills, 313 Whitehaven 
Road. Virginia Beach Borough. 

10. Sam Arrington requests a variance of 10 feet to a 10 
foot front yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
(residential addition) on Lots 20, 21, and Western half 
of Lot 19, North Virginia Beach, M8 76th Street. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

11. Ronald Johns by Schertle Pools, Inc. requests a 
variance of I foot to a 4 foot side yard setback (west 
side) instead of 5 feet as required (swimming pool) on 
Lot 2, Block 23, Diamond Springs Homes, 5629 West- 
bury Road. Bayside Borough. 

12. A Fuentes requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot 
side and rear yard setbacks (northeast corner) instead of 
10 feet each as required (swimming pool) on Lot 30, 
Section 4, Larkspur, 4724 Southern Pine Drive. Kem- 
psville Borough. t 

13. Christopher G. and Teresa M. Doty request a 
variartce of 2 feet in fence height to a 6 foot fence in- 
stead of a 4 foot fence as allowed in a required side yard 
adjacent to a street (Topaz Circle), Lot 51, Block H, 
Section 3, Salem Villages, 3981 Topaz Lane. Kempsville 
Borough. 

14. David L. Snyder requests « variance of 1 free- . 
standing sign to 2 free-standing^^signs instead of 1 free- 
standing sign as allowed on Parcel X, Lynnhaven In- 
dustrial Park, 2697 Dean Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 

15. Horst P. Elsbergen requests a variance of 26 feet to ': 
a 4 foot setback from Holland Road instead of 30 feet 
as required (through lot - swimming pool) on Lot 13, 
Block D, Section 1, Windsor Oaks West, 3817 Forrester 
Way. Kempsville Boroughs 

16. Stanley D. Grimm requests a variance of 5 feet to a ; 
15 foot rear yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
(glassed in porch) on Lot 4, Block L, Section 2, 
Parliament Village. 5378 Leicester Court. Kempsville : 
Borough. 

17. Richard D: Hertzig requesU a variance of 14 feet 2 : 
inches to a 3 foot 10 inch side yard adjacent to a street : 
(Holly Road) instead of 18 feet as required and of .5 feet : 
to a 7.5 foot side yard setback (east side) instead of 8 : 
feet as required (residential addition) on Lot 14, Block : 
1 1 , Ubermeer, 222 55th Street. Lynnhaven Borough. : 

18. Bruce B. Mills requests a variance of 15 feet to a 20 
foot setback from Rodrigu^ Drive instead of 35 feet as 
required on Lots 23. 24 and 25, Block 5, East Norfolk, 
Bonney Road and Rodriguez Drive. Kempsville . 
Borough. 

19. W. F. Oliver, Jr. and Barbara P. Oliver requests a 
variance of 9 feet to an 11 foot front yard setback 
(Ocean View Avenue) instead of 20 feet as required and 
of 2 feet to a 6 foot side yard setback (east side) instead '. 
of 8 feet as required of Lot '7 and 8, Block 17, 
Chesapeake Park, 4828 Bay Bridge Lane. Bayside 
Borough. 

20. Richard J. Gecri requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 ; 
foot side yard setback (east side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (swimming pool) on Lot 5, Forrest Park, 1000 
Timberwood Court. Lynnhaven Borough. 

21. Dr. Sidney Coren requests a variance of 3 feet to a 
IS foot side yard adjacent to a street (58th Street) in- 
stead of 18 feet as required and^of 3.1 fwt to a 4.9 foot 
side yard setback (north side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (2 story residential addition) on Lot 7, Block 4, 
New Virginia Beach, 5800 Ocean Front Avenue. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. John W. Kellam requests a variance of 19,500 square 
feet of land area to 10,500 square feet of land area in- 
stead of 30,000 square feet of land area as required and ' 
125 feet of lot width to 75 feet in width instead of 200 
feet of lot width as requir«l for a multiple family 
development on L<^ 16 and eastern half of Lot 18, - 
Block 38, Virginia Beach Development Corporation, 
516 20th Street. Virignia Beach Borough. 
ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD. 
Garland L. Isdell 
Secretary 
193-13 2T 4/13 VB 



Public Notice 
On February 23, 1983, 
Brian J. Frinlman filed 
with the Federal Com- 
munications Commission 
wi q>plication for con- 
struction permit for a new 
commercial television 
station on Channel 43 to 
be licensed to Virginia 
Beach. The station will 
qperate with 30(W kw of 
power at an antenna 
height of 846.5 feet. The 



transmitter will be about 1 
mile south of. Driver, 
Virginia. The main studio 
will be within the city 
limits of Virginia Beach. 

The applicant is a sole 
proprietor. The ap- 
plication is available for 
publTc inspection during 
library hours at the 
Virginia Beach Public 
Library, Main Branch, 
Virginia Beach. 
195-8 3T 4/25 VB 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 1 3. 1983 1 5 



Classified Ads 



1. 



GREAT BRIDGE HIGH 
SCHOOL STAIHUM 

DRAiNAcx mraoviMDns 

The City of Chesapeake, Vir- 
^nia will receive scaled bkb in 
accordant with the law, for 
H^nstruction pf the above project 
until 2:00 o'clock p.m. local time 
on the 14th day of April, !983, at 
' the office of the City Engineer, 
Department of Public Works, 
Engineering Division, 
Chesapeake Civic Center. 
Public ServiM Building, Albcr- 
marle Drive, Chesapeake, 
Virginia. Bids will be publiciy 
opened and read aloud at that 
time. Bids are to be submitted on 
the attached form of the Bid Pr- 
oposal, in sealed envelopes 
bearing the bidders name and 
address and dearly marked "Bid 
on Drainage Improvements 
Great Bridge High School 
Stadium. 

Drawings and Specifications 
may be examined without charge 
at the office of the Engineering 
Administrator, Department of 
Public Works, Engineering 
Division, City of Chesapeake, 
Civic Center, Public Services 
Building, Albermarle Drive, 
Chesapeake, Virginia; Tidewater 
' Area Business and Contractors 



I. 



\t HIMviMCVm^WTv 



: 



29* HUP WSr^Pw 



13. M» 



32.lMkMMFfrRMt 



T 



42.CMMCar« 



^VB:Aud0otR^try 
^ & Ffce Pappy Referral. 

List your stud Dog or puppy 
litter. Very Reasonable. 
Nancy Dunn...49S>1019 
Open 9 am-7 pm. _. 



1^.9 



Association' (T. A. B.C. A), 
ProfcssioMl Aru ftiiMiag, 143 
West York Street, Suite 41 5,^ 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510; 
Buibtov and Contrwnors Ex- 
duu^. Inc., 210 E. 21st Street, 
Norfcrfk. Virginia 23317; f. W. 
Dodge Reports, 16 Koger 
amative Center, Norfolk, Va. 
23302. Copies of the Drawings 
and Spedfications may be ob- 
tained from the Engineo' upon 
the dqxMit of Wrty DoUan 
(S30.00), which sum will be 
refunded upon return of the 
Drawings and Spedfications in 
IpXMl condition within ten (lOi 
days after the date on which bids 
were recdved. 

ffidders 1^0 wish to be shown 
over the wwk by representatives 
of the Public Works Department 
shtNild attend a Prc-Bid Con- 
ference at 10:00 a.m. local time 
on April 7, 1983 at the intersec- 
tion of Mount Pleasant Road 
and Stadium Drive. 

Bidders are required under 
Title 54, Chapter 7, Article I, 
Code of Virginia to show eviden- 
ce that they possess a current 
license from the Sute Board of 
Contractors to engage in con- 
tracting. Hie Bidder shall phice 
in the outside of the envelope 
containing his bid over bis 
signature the following notation 
"licensed Virginia Contractor 

No and "Chesapeake 

Contractors License No.. 



INCOME TAX - and Account-' 
ing (indoding tax au«ttts). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. (near 
lUMemont Rd.) CaU 463-MM. 
- ITFN 

CAREER EXPLORATION 

Seminar - Identic your skilk, see 
new alternatives, plan your 
future. April 28-29. CaU for tai- 
formation. 463-2788. 

^ 14T4-aO 

CXEIMT PROBLEMS? Rccdve 
a Mastercard or Visa, Guaran- 
teed, Nobody refusal; for free 
Brochure send Self Addressed 
Stamped envelope to CREDIT 
DATA, Po. O. Box 271084, 
Dallas Texas 75227 or- call 
ANYTIME 214-324-3944. 
14T4-27 

FISHING SITES WANTED - 

Physidan desires permission to 
fish your private pond or lake. 
Fish returned to water. 547-301 1 - 
days. 

12T4-13 

JUNK CARS - Wreeta(«J or run- 
ning cash-free towing. We also 
buy used radiators and batteries. 
7 days a week. Call 487-9222 or 
aft«^ 6 p.m. 857-3370. 

ITFN 



WANTED TO RENT ■ Private 
docksUe space for eritocn^ar. 
Vi^nia Beach area oniy. CaU 
543-2088 or 423-7637. 



mm ^v^vOTMW 



3 




GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for. 

People Planning 

Homes d Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 
333 Providence Rd. 

C^LL 464-9317 



mmm 



Each Proposal must be ac- 
companied by a bid bond in the 
amount equal to not less than 
five percent (5V») of the 
proposal. 

The City of Chesapeake ex- 
pressly reserves ^e right to rejed 
any or all proposals, to waive 
any informalities in the 
proposals received, and to accept 
that proposal which in its 
judgement best serves the interest 
of the City. 

Drainage Improvements to 
Great Bridge High School 
Stadium consists of ap- 
proximately 200 ( ±) L.F. of 13" 
storm drainage pipe and ap- 
putenances, ditch regarding, and 
pavement restoration. 

All bids must be in strict com- 
pliance with the provisions of the 
Invitation to Bid section of the 
contract documents for "Great 
Bridge High School Stadium" 

in case of a claimed error, the 
bidder must give notice in writing 
of his claim or right to wkhdraw 
his bid within two (2) miness 
days after the conclusion Of the 
bid opening. 

12T4-I3 



ATTENTION MIUTARY • E-4 

to E-9: Dental Plan, Champus 
Aid, discounts on stereos, autos. 
Low rate auto, life insurance 
through NCOA Klembership. 
Pete Schuhl USN (RET) 463- 
6690. 

24t4-27 
ORIENTAL GIRLS SEEK 
American men for friendship, 
marriage. Individual introduc- 
tions. Information photos S2. 
Equator, Box 57031 1-A15, 
Miami, Fla. 33157. 
24T4-1 3 

RKXIVE A MACTISCAIO 

OR Visa. Oaaranteed, nobody 
refused; for free brochure caO 
House of Credit, toU free 1-«XP 
44M53I anytime. 



4. MM 



^ 



OTYOr 
vmCINU REACH 

In accordance with the 
requiremcatt of Sectka. 3. of the 
Housing * Ufbu DevdopoMOt 
Act of 1968, Part 1 33, the aty of 
Virginia Beach poats job vacan- 
cies ctmtimimisly with each of 
the following: 
Beachwood Civic League 
Burton SUtion Ovic Lcapie 
Doyletown Qvic League 
Gracctown Gvic Lea^w 
Ncwtigkt Civic League 
NewsQoie Farm Civic League 
Queen aty Ovic League 
Rcedtown Ovic Lea^ 
Sotack Civic Le^uc 
Kiagiom Hall Jrtovah's Wit- 

nen 
New Jerusalem Church of Ood 

in Christ 
Morning Star Baptist canird& 
St. Stq>hen's Oiurdi of Ood 

inChrist 
NewU^t Baptist Church 
House of Prayer for All 

People 
New Hope Bapdtf Church 
First Baptist Church of Lynn- 
haven 
TabCTnade Holiness Churdi 
Virginia Emptoynent Com- 
mission 
we urge all Target area residoiu 
to review these job listings and 
apply for any City position for 
which they qualify. For further 
information, contact the City of 
Virginia Beach, Dept, of Per- 
sonad, 427-4157. 

10 IT 4-13 

TELEPHONE SALES • Mor- 
ning hours, salary and bonuses. 
No experience necessary. We 
train. Great for studenU and 
housewives. CaU 627-1999. 

10 WN 

ARE YOU READY to work for 
something you believe in? 
Virginia Action is training ttaJt 
to work on consumer isracs. 
Hours Mod. Ttoougb Fri. MO 
p.m. CaU 625-7364. 

10 4 T 4-20 

MANAGER TRAINEE 



AUTO BODY REPAIR Instruc- 
tor in tN rehabiliutivc school. 
Authorities School at the St. 
Brides (Correctional Center, 
located in Chesapeake. Starting 
salary SI4,5S6, depending on 
education and experieiux. Ap- 
plicant must be eligible for the 
vocational-Mlucation oertificaU,' 
which requires a high school 
diploma and 6 yean experience- 
in the trade. Send completed 
state applications to the 
RchabiliUtive School Authority, 
101 N. 14th St. Richmond, Va. 
23219 before April 20, 1%3. For 
additional information caU Dr. 
Don Stowers, at 1804-421-714!. 
E.O.E. 
10 2T 4-13 

ATTENTION LADIES - Under- 
cav'er Wear Home Lingerie Par-^ 
tiers. Have a party or become an 
a^t. Call Belina - 422-1408; 
Penny - 423-1840 or Sandy - 245- 
8764. 

_ 104T4-27 

gAUS4tEWARO YOURSELF 
Top positions bdng fiUed in 
Tidewater and surrounding 
areas. Weekly pay, commission, 
car allowance, monthly bonuses. 
Good working conditions. Work 
hi your area. Be home every 
B^. Have the support of a 50 
year M company. Opportttnity 
for advancement. Training 
period with pay. No prevtous 
sales ciperience necessary. Must 
have your own car and phone 
and be ova 21. CaU HUFF 
COOK at 483-3390 

lfit5Z4 

EXCELLENT INCOME for 
part time home assembly work. 
For information caU 5(M-64I- 
8003 Ext. 7699 

10-4T-5/4 



PARROT - SPECULATE 

Amazon, 5 yrs. old, complete 
idth ca^. S450.00 or best offer. 
(^428-3863 

13-IT-4/13 

SCHNAUZERS • Minature. 
AKC, champion blood line. 3 
females. I male. $250 to S300. 
Terms and waiting list available. 
Taking depMits now. Call 467- 

0063 

13-1T-4/I3 

SHETLAND SHEEPDOGS - 
AKC, 4 blue Merle females, call 
3406112 

I3-1T-4/13 



STORES AND STORAGE areas 
- All Sizes, Properties unlimited. 
Marvin Goldfarb. 399-8390. 484- 

1273. 

32TFN 



33. ApartRMirt* Fw Rent 



CHILD CARE - Need two 
children any age. excelleni care 
and conditions, full time. Kem- 
psville/CHarletown area. After 
6 p.m.. Call 467-71 14. 

424T4-1J 



IS. 



WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE - 

Any major appliances. Call 547- 
4030. 

154T4-27 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach. ApartmenUrfor adults. I 
and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
2 bedroom townhouses. We pay 
Imu and hot water. The Pines. 
CaU 468-2000. 

., 33-TFN 

APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS • Great Bridge. 4 
locations, one and 2 bedroom 
apartmenu. From S260. Rental 
office, 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

33TFN 



^ ■ I 



CONCRETE - Quality work 
done on driveways, sidewalks, 
patios and pool decks, etc. New 
or old construction. Call Scott, 
482-2672. 

43 4T 4-27 



45. ExttnnliMtbig 



TT- 



WASHERS, 

REfrigerators 
CaU 460-4512. 



Dryers, Ranges, 
Reasonable rates. 

I5TFN 



31. iMi Estate 



U.ArticiM Far Sale 



HUMMELS • Nkc selection. 
Diamonds and fine jewelry. 
Bayshore Gift Sht^. 7950 Shore 
Dr. CaU 588-1 111 
Jfci] 



FOR SALE • 15 acres, Grandy, 
N.C. On rt. 158 with house 
traUer by owner. Good buy with 
possible terms. Cal) 420-94*5 
36-4T-5/4 



MASTER PEST Control -• 
ScientiFic rxtermination. Sand 
and moisturi control, windowsill 
and joicc repair, hoose jacking. 
Free Termite inspection. $5 off 
on termite control, $50 off on 
roach control with this ad. 
F.H.A. & V.A. reports given. 
Call 487-4024. 

45-66t-3/9/g4 



4t.la»tftti0B/14RcatlaR I 






IT.Fwiillwt 



ndiin. 



FURNITURE REONISHED - 

Why buy new? Free pick-up and 
ddivery. Free estimates. Prkx 
most reasonable. 424-4899. Also 
quality upholstery work. Call 
467-9684. 

. 17 4T 4-27 




18. AatifNif 



tl> PaaMtM WiRlaf 



A BETTOI DEAL FOR YOUR 
MOBILE. Running or not! Free 
towing. Call 499-4028 or 543- 
5164 

4-4T-5H3 



E 



7. 



WANfW 

comR 

Joe M. DMlwr 
CoapBoyt Inc. 

4tt-H50 



HONDA-1979, CM400T. Win- 
dshield, back rest, low mih^e. 
$900.00 or best offer. CaU 499- 
7060 

7-1T-4/I3 

1979 HONDA - 185 Twin Star, 
black, dectric kick start, duid 
exhaust. Was $793 only 1595. 
CaU anytime home 427-1477,. 
work 463-3040. 

7TFN 



A-1 Paving 

spring Special 
25<7o Discount 

Driveways, Pari^ Lob, Seal 
Coaling, SidcwaOa and Patch- 
work. Bted( Top Only. FrM 

EsdiMlcs 

460-4079 

4-U 




A«?1 . 

Vii^nl»-NofttafaiBa 

WITH G0(» CSEDITIV TO 

100% olryaiiic 

RcflnaBceMor^^n 
lst,2Bd,orMi 
lasoBccaa 

. RADCREDIT 

wlAMfflcicBlycvrtty 

C^aranteed 
Approval 

' St(H>Foneionuif 
PayJadgemeatiOr 

IRS 

yUsoVAAiBA 

OpcaTHinf 

s^MTaim 

Q«ittri 
4M-ltM 

After H o ia ^ i i CIS 



IF YOU ARE A MATURE 
DEPENDABLE HOUSEWIFE, ABLE 
TO WORK WITHOUT SUPER VISION 
WE DO HAVE A JOB FOR YOU! 

Guaranteed '3.35 per hour working from the com- 
fort of ymir home. Good worker may earn u 
much as 's-OO per hour. AU you have to do « aU 
local housewives for used tax deductable 

househoW discards, to support local D.A.v. 
MOSELUNG 461-1473 




Ap- 
plications are now being accep- 
ted for manager trainee poaition. 
We oner good m(»ey and good 
futtire. For interview caU 463- 
7624. 
_^ I04TTFN 

WRITE yoi» ~ 

OWNPAYCHECX 

Are you tired of the same old 
routine? Are you worth more 
than you're apid? WeU, it's time 
to step up. We are looking for 
dynamic and aggrenive tan and 
women with taloK to deal with 
the pubUc. If you fed you have 
tiKW quaUfications, caU: 229- 
1457 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
for 4>pointment. Ask for Amy. 
10 4T 4-27 

COUN8ELUNG/8ALES • The 

non-commissioned and pdty of- 
ficers assodatimi is in need of 
resident counseUon in the local 
area. Contact Mr. Durst. ^9- 

9878. 

lOTFN 

PiiRt TIME - Sdcs, need sttt": 
chery lovers with (ksire to earn 
extra income. No deliveries, 
training. CaU 486-6317. 

19 4T 4-27 



GENERAL HOUSE Cleaning 
reUable and experienced. C«U 

340-1389. -,t>;TFN 

EXPERIENCED Man and Udy 
wiUing to do cleaning; clean 
vacant apartment buildings, yard 
deaning. work as companion, do 
day work. CaU 622-0792. 

114T4-27 

iluLirPRA'CTICAL Norse. 
Certified and Ucensed 10 years 
experience in hospital and 
residential nursing. Any shift. 
References. CaU 625-7093 

. • ll-lT-4/13 

NURSES AID licensed for 
gerittrics. FuU time or part time. 
Own itranspoitttion. References 
available. CaU 397-4771 

IHT-?/-* 

SHUT-INS, WORKING 
mothers or treat someone spedal 
to a shampoo set, hair cut, per- 
manent wave, in your home. CaU 
345-3277 

II-4T-; 



ANTIQUE STOVE - Wood/coal 
stove. Good condition. Call days 
at 547-457 1 after 6 call 485-4684. 

I8TFN 

FVORY COLLECTION - 
Statues, Netjike, Orientia 
screens, silks. Cloisonne neck- 
laces; Vases and Boxes. 1804 
Granby St., 625-9119. Daily 10- 

5. 

18TFN 



22.Jfwalry 



DOMINION - '73, Shed, skir- 
ting, 275 gaUon oil drum. 2 
bedroom, can stay on lot. $4,500 
or $2,000 and assume balance. 
545-4729 

3g-lT-4/13 

HOUSE TRAILER: 1970 Sher- 
wood - 12 by 60, good condition, 
2 bedroom new hot water heater 
and faucetu, undenkirt. $3,500. 
Call 543-6467 or 343-5164 

38^T-5/3 

MARSHFIELD - 3 bedroom, 2 
baths, double wide, new car- 
p^ing and fireiriace. Park Uke 
rental lot in London Bridge. 
$28,000 or $9,000 down and 
assume balance. Call 340-3238 

38-IT-4/13 

MOBILE HOME: 1981 Com- 
modore, 2 bedroom with wood- 
itove and appliances, 14 feet 
wide. $1,000 down and assume 
payments of $129.06 a month. 
Must be moved off lot. Call 466- 
8005 

38-1T-4/13 



PIANO TCACHER: Your home 
or mine. Music Degree, 10 years 
experience. All levels, all ages. 
Before 3 p.m. and after 7 p.m. 
Call 588-5535 

48-4TJ/4_ 



^w» HaviRf ■ HaMN^ 


MOVING - Cleaning and 
Hauling of all kinth. CaU 543- 
2697. 

49 4T 4-27 


SI. Palntiflg 


PAINTING: INTERIOR and tX- 

terior. Free estimates. Lai'ge or 
small jobs. Fair prices. 485-3002 
51-ir-4A3 



LAbnS JEWELRY FOR SAXE 

One ladies cocktaU ring with 45 
diamonds and is 14 carat ydlow 
gold. Also a 14 carat white gold 
23 jewd huUes Bulova watch. 
Ring appraised at $3400 and' 
watch appraised at $1900. WUl 
sdl dther for half the appraised 
value. CaB 547-0858 after 5:00 
p.m. 22 TFN 



24. Wanted To Bay. 



HOLIDAY - 1975. excdient 
condition. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 
and appliances, new vinyl skir- 
ting, plus many exras. Moving 
must seU. Home must be moved. 
$9,400 or best offer. Call 468- 
0770. If no answer call 427-2176. 

38 TFN 

CONER • '82 14 by 70. 2 
bedrooms, 2 lMthrooms,-«aiM*al 
air. fireplace, fenced yard, shed. 
Woodshire Trailer Park. 
Chesapeake. Call 487-2>)36. 

38 4T 4-27 



WALLPAPERING AND 

Painting - Fast and friendly ser- 
vice, local references furnished. 
Call us for a free estimate. Ar- 
thur and Comi»ny Redecorating 
Conractors. 4a)-3478. 

' 51 TFN 

PAINTING - Large or small 
jobs. Interior and exterior. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References available upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

51 TFN 



52. PlMtagraphy 



11 



4T-3/4 

Mritjr 



Job Training 

Bank Teller 
OrOttkitf 

HavaANtirTniaiaOiriy 

4 Weeks 

CaalaniAallteiiAi 

*5.0ePerHoiir 

Catl 4254333 

UBmn 

KajrLtaraATMi 

MIGnuAylMIRakSH 

4-21 



BLUE AND GREY Flea Market 
- Inside and outside spaces.- 
Grand opening specials on out- 
side tables. 2640 Nevada Ave., 
Norfolk. CaU 853-9521. Open 
Friday, Sat. and Sun. 
_ 124-^7 

ATTENTION: Flea Market 
DeatersI Buy at wholesale and 
bdow wholesale. Independent 
Sala. 1616 Meadowlake Dr. 
Norfolk, or caU 857-4007. 

I2TFN 

INSTRUCTOR/COUNSELOR 
Conduct dynamic personal and 
professional development 
programs. FuU or pari time. In- 
dependent business opporiunity, 
mi ninMif unvestment. CaU 463- 

rn. 

12 4T 4-20 

STAR OF THE SEA SCHOOL 

Ftea Market - Sat. May 14th 10- 
7:30. sun. May 15th 9-2. Rait 
indoor taUe now. $13.50 both 
days or SIO.OO Sat. only. CaU: 
428-4933 OT 481-1568. 

12 4T 4-27 



CASH PXrO- Virginia Meach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oU pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire housefuUs. Also, good 
used furniture. Call 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24 TFN 

WE NEED COINS - Stamps- 
Oold-Silver-pocket watches- 
usable jewelry. Anything related. 
C^ now-top doUar. CASTLE 
COINS AND STAMPS, 1107 S. 
MUitary Hiwy., next to Toy 
Castle, 420-2646 
24-4T -5/? 

TABLE SAW - PKefer carWde 
blade. WiU pay cash. CaU 627- 
30208 - 5 p.m. Ask for Lisa. 



39< Prafassiaiial Sanricat 



IcmI 



LEIGH PHOTOGRAPHIC* 

Service - Beautiful Wedding 
Memories - Photography For 
Any Occasion. Call 482-1312 
Today. "The Wedding Photo- 
graphers". 

52 TFN 



2S.8aadTlilag«TaIrt | 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS - 

Across from Hurd Seafood 
Restaurant. Shucked in own 
natural judes. By quarts, pinu, 
or bushels. CaU 340-5171. 

25-TFN 



muwitwiiR I 



IS. Mi 



I^°I^a[nb*iiaM-«i I AntiqaeRepibrA 



RefioisUBg 

Caaloai rcprodactloas 
araMaMr. I* yoo can Xutf /m 
■(.IcaaMUH. 

CaU 424^99 



ReMwYoMraail 
Or 



With 

Crete or adbtpw. 



Ml in ooB- 



LeroyMllcrTDeCo. 
1T4-6 4«2-31M 



p »# * »w# w ^ w #»»#«i#»>#» 



High Qualiiy At Low Prkc 

BABY 
BAZAAR 

Baby Furniture by Basselt 
Nursery Accowria 



' 
i 
i 



i Speeiri CJifli lor Special 






FREE LAY-AWAY 
Wi«lWCMIB-*Wl 

467-S032 

ISii L yaa lM ww fkn. 

Ha %4w^V*a ^^HH 

M-FIMSMW4 




mwmnr 



^MSS 



CAGES: CUSTOM wrought 
bon. Let your crertivity become 
reality. I wiU build that 
ia^aaitve home for your birds 
mi odwr pett. Lowest price in 
town. 4244^9 

4-1T-4/I3 

PliANfiAS - 17 large with 70 
gallon aq^uffls. Also 15 gaUon 
and IQpdIon. AU oxnpieidy sd- 
■p withstands. 467-5416 

I1-1T4/13 

fOaaUi.r\snW&: Sumdard, 

bla^. ExceOent brenting, great 

tfqwiitioa. 4 Males, 4 Females. 

Cdl497-»^ 

13-IT4/13 



HOB8ESHOE3NG 

IFanftr, 
iPrtecB.lSY«ars 
.Cdr 
ES^EAKMAN. 
422-23^ 



WALKER AND SONS 
TREESEXVICE 

Removal, topping, stump grin- 
ding, crane service, fuUy insured. 
Free estimates, 488-9061 
anytime. 
29 4T 4-27 

CoMWidal- Reridea aal 
Landsca^ng Service* 
TORO Sprinkter Systems In- 
staUed. North Landing Nursery 
(Next to Farmers Market), 
Virdnia Beach. 427-6886 
MTFN 

LANDSCAPING SERVICE 

Lawn and Garden ttttotwiion, 
grading and seeding. Free 
estimates. 421-7350. 

28 TFN 

MULCH-BUTUS AND SON 

Siredded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
while on sale. We (teliver in oiw 
day. 853-0250 or 855-7467. 

29TTN 



L * L PLUMBING, Heating, 
and Air Conditioning; Repair 
and new work-sewer lines, water 
heaters.- faucets repaired and 
drains unstopped. 24 hours. Call 
853-0056. 
39 4T 4-27 

AAW REPAIR: All phases of 
carpentry and painting. 
Professional roofing, guttering, 
vinyl siding, ceramic tile, room 
additions and garages. Licensed, 
insured, and bonded. All work 
guaranteed. Call 399-8941 

3iMT-?/? 

PLASTERING: NEW and 
repair work. 30 years experience. 
Free estimates. Call 583-7494 

39-IT-4/I3 

PLASTERING • Experienced, 
aU kinds. smaU or large jobs. 
Also hang waU-boards and do all 
kinds of cement work. Free 
estimates. CaU 853-5774 

3{MT-?/3 

APPRAISALS - by graduate 
gemologist. Set appointment. 
Bryant Gemologist Laboratory. 
CaU 588-1111 

39-1T-4/I3 

UPHOI^TERY: 10 years ex 
perience. sofas and chairs. Fair 
prices. Free pick-up and delivery. 
Free estimates. CaU 485-3002 

39-IT-4/13 

ALL TYPES OF Rower bed 
work. Reasonable rates. Hedges 
trimmed and cut. WUl Sfx-ead 
topsoil 

3MT-5/3 

SHARPENING - Saws, knives, 
scissors, blades, almost 
anything. Reasonable rates. 
Work guaranteed. Call 547-7645. 
39 TFN 



55. 



BATHROOM REMODELING - 

Old and new. Specializing in 
ceramic tile walls and floor 
covering. Reasonable rates. Free 
estimates. 20 years experience in 
Tidewater area. Small and large 
jobs. Guarantee all work. Call 
547,-4774 anytime. 

55 TFN 



M« Tax •anwi) 



INCOME TAX • and Account- 
ing (induding tax audits). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent, 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd., (near 
Rosemont Rd.) CaU 463-6608. 

39-TFN 



•LHacMnaryAadTaals 



MACHINERY AND TOOLS: 

Payloader-1978, 515 Inter- 
national articulating payloader, 
2 yards. No hrs. since major 
overhaul. Looks and runs like 
new. $35,000. CHARLIE 
BRYANT 461^1023 
»l-4T-5/4 

PAYLOADER-1978. 515 Inter- 
national articulating payloader, 
2 yards. No hrs. since major 
overhaul. Looks and runs like 
new. $35,000. CHARLIE 
BRYANT 461 -4023 
6MT-5/4 

BULLDOZER-TD 15 Series B. 
NO hours since major overhaul. 
Like new. $30,000. Charlie 
Bryant 461 -4023, tiU 9 p.m. 

6I-4T-5/4 



40.Scrvlcci 




Commercial & Residential 

Design - BuUd 

Dean P< Edwards, Im. 



n 



Room^^iditiMis 

Cterages 

Deda 

OtaMpeake 

I0M21-9273 



RffiioMii^ 

Ojooe^Wivk 

fikw Hone O>nff^tfou 

919-Ml-^Oi 




X12lltfMAtf« 

$795.00 
S^ITE LIME BUILDERS 



When Something Needs 
Building or Repaired, Yoa Need 

BLACK 

BROS. 

Home ImproYcmcnc 

Specialisls 
•Buildi«gCohiraclt»fRoof»«Carports»Oarage$ 
•Bath Remodcled'Room Additions 
•AluminumSidings-Kltchcn Remodeling 

545-7318 . 

HatHE-Madt.^- 




SAVr NOW ON SPRING 
TUNE-UP'S, MOTOR- 
CYCLES, AND MOPEDS. 
CASH OFF PARTS AND 
LABOR. HALF MILE WEST 
OF MILITARY HIWY. BIG 
SID'S. 461-8959 

4<Mt-5/4 

ANBOmm REMOi»LING - 
AU types of home repairs. Pain- 
tiz^ roofing, siding, carpentry, 
etc. Work guaranteed. Free 
eAfanates. Inured and bmided. 
CaU 588-2558. 

40 TFN 

Unr us CLEAN Your Office. 
Any schedule that is convenknt 
for you. You can afford our 
prices. 623-0741 for free 
estimates. Ask for Lome. 

<g*r^27 

TREASURES AND JUNK - 

Don't throw it away. I'B come 

and get it. Call 545-0459 or 545- 

1»6. 

40^4-27 

CAVCT CLEANING and ia- 

siatt^. (^Btact AmM, 488- 
7138. 

40 4T 4-27 



•2.naa Mariiat 



FLEA MARKET: Ocean Park 
Women's club. April 16. 8 a.m. 
until.. Baylake United Methodist 
Charch. 4300 Shore Dr. Benefits 
charities. Rain daU: April 23 8 
a.m. 

62-IT-4/I3 

MSCNUH'S FLEA MARKET: 
5939 Va. Beach, Blvd. 461-9778 
INSIDE SHOPS OPEN 7 
DAYS. GOLD/SILVER 
BOUGHT/SOLD. OUTSIDE 
SPACES, SAT. AND SUN. 15 
A DAY. 

62-«T-5/4 

UC TOP FLEA MARKET • 
Have your sale here, ^ying gold 
and diwiwnds, etc. 7600 Sewelb 
Pt. Rd. 480-3122, Tue*. thru 

aM^T?/< 

FARIS ST. FIXA MARKET; 
3450 AZALEA GARDEN RD 
SHOES. SOCKS. AND HOSE 
FOR YOUR DOLLS. WILL 
DRESS IN CHRISTENING 
CLOTHES WITH FRENCH 
BONNETS. CALL 853-5877 
e-4T-5/3 



■w 




Dealership Serving Tidewater For Over Fifty Years 



Optimism Abounds At Perry Buick 



"We've made a profit 
every year we've been in 
business, and we will 
again this year." That 
statement is certainly 
typical of the optimistic 
view that has been taken 
for over fifty years by the 
man who made it, Aubrey 
H. Perry, Sr., board 
chairman, Perry Buick. 

As one would imagine, 
the son, Aubrey H., Jr. 
speaks with as much en- 
thusiasm, and remains as 
optimistic about the 
future of Perry Buick." 
We have excellent product 
engineering, quality and 
appearance, and we 
believe through these we 
will increase sales," Perry 
Jr. stated. 

"Furthermore, the 
present demand for new 
cars is as gocxl or better 
than its' ever been, and 
the reduced interest rates 
will do a lot to attract the 
buyer. The annual vehicle 
scrap has reached enor- 
mous proportions with 
close to 9 million cars 
towed to auto graveyards 
annually, "those cars 
have to be replace," said 
Aubrey Jr. recently. 
When people keep their 
cars longer, he said, a 
dealer's sales are helped 
by the extra servicing the 
older vehicles require and 
by surging parts sales. 

The Perry s* are even 
looking forward to an ex- 
pansion program which 
will include three other 
"experienced, trained, 
and quite capable 



Perry's," Aubrey H. 
(Buster) Perry III, general 
manager of Perry Buick; 
James M. Perry, new and 
used car coordinator, and 
Walter A. Perry, new car 
manager. The Perry name 
has virtually become a 
household word in 
Tidewater, having served 
the area for over 51 years. 
The central location, 
company reputation, 
capable service crews and 
aggressive advertising 
campaigns have all con- 
tributed to their success 
over the years. 

The Perrys'. themselves, 
attribute much of their 
success in a bad economy 
to repeat business by 
faithful customers and 
Perry Jr. said it all this 
way last week; "we have a 
human relationship with 
our customers and that's 
what keeps us a step ahead 
of the competition." He 
further stated that the ex- 
cellent reputation the 
Perry dealership has main- 
tained over the years for 
service and "keeping their 
word" on promises to 
customers is probably 
responsible for Perry 
Buick's ability to retain 
those "faithful 

customers." 

From the Great 
Depression to today's 
economic woes, the 
Perrys' have seen it all. 
They remain steadfast in 
their belief that the 
Golden Rule has its ap- 
plication in business and is 
probably as responsible 




Perry Buick 

Keeps econoiiQ^ 
inits place. 




for their longevity. But, 
the Buick name is a big 
part of it all they readily 
admit and this year's 
selection offers the finest 
technology and 

engineering they've seen in 
a long time. 

From a handful of em- 
ployees over fifty one 
years ago to a present staff 
of over 80 and with assets 
that have grown from 
S32,000 (and the need to 
borrow), to assets of over 
S2 million in buildings, 
land, equipment and in- 
ventory—Perry Buick — 
6633 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard— (near New- 
town Road) in Virginia 
Beach— seems solidly en- 
trenched in the highly 
competitive Tidewater 
new car dealership 
market. 




Hie 19SJ 'Buick S^yiaili- 

EPA 46 Hwy., 28 City 



^^^^pF yjumt^ _ 




Hie 196?'BaiCk SloAiaMk. 




EPA 42 Hwy., 27 City 

9.9*7o Financing available 
on these models 

offer OHb May 3ltt.lM3 



PERRY BUICK 

SERVING TIDEWATER 
OVER 52 YEARS 

461-8855 



I VANTASTIC SPRING SALE 

On All Custom Vans 

$799500 



AS LOW AS 



NO ONE ANYWHERE WILL OUT 
SELL OR OUT TRADE VIRGINIA'S 
LARGEST VAN DEALER. 





463-6100 



'^yjxmsi 



3443 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Next To Princess Anne Plaza 

DMVgS02 



WHERE 
YOU'RE 




You don't give 
up a thing at 
Budget 

1 



1982 J-2000 

Or 

1982 FORD 

EXP'S 



r 




DOWN 



$ 



139 



MONTH 



Cash Price $5 1 56, Down Payment 
$86. Finance Charg« $1602, Total 
Payment $6672, Total Deferred 
Payment $6758. Used Car APR 
14.54%. 4« Mo«., With Approved 
Credit. 



420-5450 

DMV 133 





PONTIAC-VOLVO 

1800 Greenbrier Parkway 
Chesapeake, Virginia 23320 



Tidewater's Largest 

Inventory Of 

S-10 and K-10 4x4 

Pick-Up Trucks 



WYNNKMOIOR 
CORP. 




i2.*'''5 



!!.:<;: 



Up To 

*2000"* 
Discount! 

(With This Ad) 

Kline Chevrolet 

1495 S.MUitary Hwy, 

3 Mi. Sofllk of Military Circle 

424.1811 



13.4*)5 



RK SACRIFICE PRICES 

NO PROFIT 
SALE 

We are overstoclied with new 1982 Models that we 
must sell during April. There's no small print in 
this ad and no gimmicks. E^^ry car is listed 
below. Come in now and pick out the new 1982 
Chevrolet you want. It doesn't matter what it says 
on the sticker, you'U get the car for what it cost us. 
AT NO PROFIT. It's as simple as that. 




\V\NMM()1()H( OKI' 



«^4''5 




Stock* 


.m^ Fritt 

Monte Carlo •9975 




6025 






6262 


Cavalier 4 Dr. ' »7575 








6321 


Qivalier4Dr. «W7S 








6430 


CdAtity2Dr. •8275 








6074 


Malibaaia»c4Dr. •n75 








6077 


Monte Carlo •9575 








6134 
6155 
6169 
6208 
6210 


MalibuClauic4I^. *9075 
CavafierC-L4Dr. •M7S 
Onralkr 2 Dr.. Hatchback *%ns 
Cavalier 4 Dr. '7975 
Civ«lfer4Dr. »7975 




^<H 




6432 


Celebrity '8475 








6532 
6533 
6575 
6590 
6600 
6727 
6795 
OOl 
«06 


Corvette •17,4» 
Corvette *M,757 
Cadjrity •1575 
OtttiOT •7t75 
Corvttte *lt^75 
CeteWty ^9275 
Ctevette ^5174 
C^brity 1«75 
Citation "W^ 
rhfv^e ^5575 




' * : 




6r74 




DKI'. 


RK 


^^^LYNNHAVEN PKWY. Al 


j(,l-(»K(Hl 


ms 


^qeeS VA.BEACaUVD. 



% 



The Virginia 

S7th V«M. No. 16. Virainia Beach. Va. ^^— ^^ AM* 20, 191 



S7tb Yew. No. 16, Viii^a Beach, V« 





posed 
Law Draws Fire 



ByLeeCahill 

Sun Council Reporter 

Virginia Beach's hand- 
gun law is slow aborning. 

Originally the ol^ct 
had been to have an 
ordinance pertaining to 
the purchase of handguns 
which would follow cur- 
rent city pdicy. 

At an informal sessim 
of Council Monday after- 
noon Councihnan Dr. J. 




Larry Joyner 

Festival 

Chairman 

Announced 

The chairman ^iLrJhc 
Tenth Annual Virginia 
Beach Neptune Festival is 
Larry L. Joyner. He will 
direct a force of over 
1,000 volunteers for the 
1983 festival scheduled for 
Sept. 28 - Oct. 2. 

Over 30 events are 
planned for this year as 
announced by Joyner, 
who was selected to be 
Festival Chairman by 
Robert Fentress, 
president, Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce 
which co-sponsors the an- 
nual celebration with the 
City of Virginia Beach. 
Ust year over 900,000 
people attended the 
festival and this year's 
goal is to reach and sur- 
pass last year's attendan- 
ce. 

Asked to give the key 
ingredients to the success 
of the Neptune Festival, 
Joyner stated, "it is the 
time of the year, that 
brings the community 
together at the beach. 
With the summer ending 
and the fall beginning the 
weather is just right for an 
outdoor festival. Along 
with the season comes the 
high caliber of people 
living in our community 
who volunteer to put the 
festival together for 
everyone to enjoy." 

Joyner, who is one of 
these volunteers himself, 
has been actively involved 
in his city for the past 20 
years in the Back Bay sec- 
tion of Virginia Beach. 
His activities include, 
member of the Executive 
Committee of the Nep- 
tune Festival; Board of 
Trustees for the Virginia 
Museum of Marine Scien- 
ce; member of Tidewater 
Boy Scout Council; 
American Red Cross; 
Creeds Ruritans Club; 
Better Business Bureau; 
Virginia Beach Rotary 
Club and Vice President 
of Development for the 
Virginia Beach Chamber 
of Commerce. 

Along with his wife. 
Rita and daughter Lee, he 
is a member of Charity 
Unitwl Methodist Church 
and looks forward to this 
year's festival which 
begins with pre-festival 
events on Sept. 17, 1983. 



Henry McCoy Jr. said that 
the involved process 
required for purchasing a 
handgun gives pec^le a 
prc^lem. He said that 
they have to go to Hamp- 
ton and Franklin or 
another locality where the 
laws are not so strict to 
purchase a weapoi. He 
said the law does not hurt 
the criminal but the lawful 
people. 

Councilman Harold 
Heischober said the law 
puts a burden cm the 
vendcff. To correct that, 
he suggested that even 
when weapois are pur- 
chased elsewhere, owners 
should be required to 
register the gun in Wt- 
ginia Beach. 

City Attorney Dale 
Bimson said that the pre- 
sent ordinance applied to 
the purchase of a hand- 
gun. He suggested that a 
separate ordinance be 
prepared to cover regis- 
trati(m. 

Councilwoman Meyera 
Oberndorf asked how 
such a registraticm ordi- 
nance would be enforced. 

Councilman Sdin A. 
Baum asked why a person 

shouldn't have to explain 
why he or she has a 
handgun. 

Criminals will continue 
to be criminals. Council- 
man Jack Jennings Jr. 
said. He said it would be a 
"nickel cffdinance" with 
no impact on the criminal 
mind. 

Councilman Robert G. 

^iones asksd for inftsn»- 

tioa from Pcii(x Chief 

Charles Wall to back up 

the need for an CM°dinance. 

Heischober said that 
convicting criminals even 
under a gun law would be 
an improvement over not 
convicting them at all. He 
pointed to the members of 
organized crime who 
served time, not for their 
more vident crimes, but 
fcMT inccxne tax evasion. 

Councilwoman Nancy 
Q-eeih said, "We don't 
make laws for lawiiil 
people. I think we can put 
lawful pe(q)le to a little 
more trouble to contrd 
the unlawful. We have to 
put the law abiding to 
some discranfOTt tocaitrd 
the others," she said. 

Jennings wanted to 
know how often a person 
who purchased a weapon 
committed a crime 
immediately afterward. 

Baum said most of the 



time gum are misused. 
"Who knows how to use 
one?" 

"Yoi're talking about 
the second amendment!" 
McCoy said. 

Referring to the Consti- 
tutional amendment 
giving citizens the right to 

See GUN. Page 4 



Beach 

Parties 

Banned 

Virginia Beach City 
Council Monday after- 
noon unanimously ap- 
proved an ordinance 
designed to cut down on 
reported wild parties on 
the beach on the 
Chesapeake Bay. 

The ordinance prohibits 
any person from carrying 
on the beach or being in 
possession on the beach of 
any food and drink bet- 
ween the hours of 6 p.m. 
and 9 a.m. from May IS 
to Sept. 30. 

Another ordinance ap- 
proved last week outlaws 
fires on the brach. 

$358,000 

Expeqt^In 

Savings 

Virginia Beach Library 
Director Marcie Sims ex- 
pects to realize a $358,000 
savings over five years by 
using computers for which 
two operators are needed. 

The employees are two 
of the three part-time em- 
ployees added to the up- 
coming budget. The third 
is a clerk-typist for 
children's services. 

Sims also told City 
Council at the budget 
workshop Monday mor- 
ning that 41 percent of the 
city's population are 
library card-holders. She 
said that this compares 
with 31 percent in Fairfax 
County, a community 
with a comparable type 
population. 



Local Officials to the right, The Swinging Madrigab from Princess Anne Junior High School to the left, 
and Jim Kincaid at the microphone. Litter Week ceremonies were held at Lynnhaven Mall. 

Virginia Beach Joins Others In Litter Fight 



The Clean Community 
Systems of Greater Ham- 
pton Roads recently 
celebrated Clean Com- 
munity Week '83. 

The week's festivities 
began with the Clean 
Community Week 
Opening Ceremony in the 
center court of Lynnhaveri 
Mall. City representatives 
of Virginia Beach, 
Chesapeake, Norfolk, 
Portsmouth, Hampton 
and Newpori News as they 
"Wave Goodbye to Lit- 
ter!" Vice Mayor Barbara 
Henley represented 
Virginia Beach. 

Radio and television 
celebrities participated Jn 

k Sltanp-A-Gan Cont Af 'tlementaiy School; 2nd 
Jim Kincaid of WVEC-TV place - Ryan Barber - 



School, directed by 
Donald Nultemeier. The 
Fort Eustis Cbtor tjuard 
presented the colors. 

Clean Community 
Week is an annual cam- 
paign which consists of a 
series of projects and ac- 
tivities designed to en- 
courage citizens to help 
keep local communities 
clean, healthy, and attrac- 
tive. 

April 1983 Litter Art 
Contest Winners ware: 

Poster Contest 
Grades K-3 

1st place - Kammie 
Clukey - Princess Anne 



was the master of 
ceremonies. Music was 
provided by the Swinging 
Madrigals '83 from Prin- 
cess Anne Junior High 



Princess Anne Elementary 
School; 3rd Place - 
Demetrius Sutton - Prin- 
cess Anne Elementary 
School; Honorable Men- 



tion - Joseph Jacobs - 
Hermitage Elementary 
School and Shawn 
Williams - Hermitage 
Elementary School. 

Poster Contest 
Grades 4-7 

1st Place - Virginia 
Dizon - Malibu Elemen- 
tary School; 2nd Place - 
Tommy Pierce - Princess 
Anne Elementary School; 
3rd Place - Melanic 
Dykins - Malibu Elemen- 
tary School; Honorable 
Mention Michelle 

Blalock - Malibu Elemen- 
tary School, Caroline 
Collins - Hermitage 
Elementary School and 
Robert Modin. 

Junior High 3D 

1st Place - Laura 
Crowell - Lynnhaven 



Junior High School; 2nd 
Place - Karie Keene - Lyn- 
nhaven Junior High 
School; 3rd Place - Kim 
Beckmann - Lynnhaven 
Junior High School; 
Honorable Mention - 
Amy Chertock - Lyn- 
nhaven Junior High 
School and Tejuana 
Thomas - Lynnhaven 
Junior High School. 



Junior High Collage 

I si Place - Kim Beck- 
mann - Lynnhaven Junior 
High School; 2nd Place - 
Adam Berger - Lynnhaven 
Junior High School; 
Honorable Mention - 
David Galbrailh - Lynn- 
haven Junior High School 
and Debbie Moran - Lyn- 
nhaven Junior High 
School. 



Oceana 
Celebrates 
With City 

This month the City of 
Virginia Beach observes 
the 20th anniversary of 
the merger of Princess 
Anne Camty and the Qty 
of Virginia Beach with a 
week-long celebration 
April 24-30 

As a vital and integral 
part of Virginia Beach's 
fast growth and prospe- 
rous economy, Naval Air 
StatiOT Oceana, a proud 
resident since the city's 
inception, plans to sup- 
port the 20th anniversary 
celebration in several 
ways. 

The major event being 
planned by NAS Oceana is 
a round of guided tours of 
the station from 1-4 p.m. 
on Wednesday April 27. 
Tours will begin at 1 p.m. 
at the picnic grounds near 
the main entrance to the 
station just off Oceana 
Boulevard. The Royal 
London Wax Museum on 
Atlantic Avenue has 
donated its red, Lmdon 
double-decker bus for the 
tours. Round trip tours 
will be made every half- 
hour with the last tour 
departing the picnic area 
at 3:30 p.m. and returning 
with all visitors at 4 p.m. 
Tours will include the 
fighter aircraft parking 
ramp with a brief stop at 
the station's Air Opera- 
tions tower building. 
There, guests may disem- 
bark the bus and inspect 
attack and fighter jet air- 
craft on static display and 
talk with assigned flight 
crews. 

NAS Oceana plans to 
display a photographic 
montage depicting the 
stations's ixcmxYi and acti- 
vity over the years during 
the "City Hall Day" event 
on April 30 and will enter 
the station's A-4 Skyhawk 
jet fighter float in the 
"Qty Hall Day" Parade. 



Small Business Council 



Chamber Announces Spring Seminars * 



"The Keys to Sales Pro- 
motion - How to Market, 
Advertise and Prcmote 
Your Business," with 
John Van Auken of 
America Direct, will be 
the lead pr<^ram for th«f 
Virginia Beach Chamber 
of Commerce's spring 
seminar series, according 
to Jim Krieger, chairman 
of the Chamber's Small 
Business Council. 

His presentation will 



include: how marketing 
can ccmtribute to the suc- 
cess of sales promotions, 
how to ccMiduct market 
research, how to use that 
research to develop suc- 
cessful advertising, and 
how to' work with an ad 
agency . 

The program will be 
presented on Wednesday, 
April 27, in the conference 
room of the Chamber 
office, 4512 Virginia 



Beach Boulevard. 

Other seminars in the 
series include: "Tax Wan- 
ing - Don't Pay More 
Than You Have To!" with 
Stephen Burke, JD, of 
Clark & Stant, and Alvin 
Wall, CPA of Goodman & 
Cconpany on May II; 
"Personnel - Hiring, Fir- 
ing and Controlling 



Unemployment Insurance 
Costs," with Margaret 
McGinn of Rices-Nach- 
mans and Leonard Doycm, 
Unemployment Insurance 
Regional Supervisor, Vir- 
ginia Employment Com- 
missicm cm May 23; Re- 
ccffding and Borrowing - 
Your Track Record and 
How To Use It," with 




Cox High School 
Presents "Pippin 



3i 



"PipiMn" cast members, (l-r), include: "Theo" - 
imx BwTiskill, 16, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter 
^nMciU; and "Pippin" - Will Hayden, 17, son 
(rfMr. and Mrs. William B. Hayden. 



Speaker: Chief Wall 

Beach Briefs Set 



Virginia Beach's top 
law-enforcement officer. 
Police Chief Charles R. 
Wall, will be the guest 
speaker for the Virginia 
Beach Chamber of 
Commerce's April Beach 
Briefs program, which 
will be held Thursday, 
April 28, at the Holiday 
Inn-Executive Center, 
Greenwich Road at New- 
town Road. 

Wall, who has been 
the Virginia Beach police 
chief since October, 
1981, will give an update 
of where his department 
is today, and the crime 
activities in the city last 
year. He wiU also be 
focusing on the depart 
ment's recent campaign 
against drunk driving. 



Chief Wall is now in 
his twenty-eighth year of 
law enforcement, having,, 
started his career as a 
military police officer in 
the U.S. Army. After his 
discharge, he began his 
civilian career with the 
police department of 
Passaic Township, New 
Jersey, as an officer, and 
rose to the rank of detec- 
tive sergeant before ac- 
cepting the post of chief 
of police for Washington 
Township, New JerseVi - 

The Brief will begin St 
7:45 a.m. in the baiU)^t 
room of the Hbli 
Inn-Executive Ce 
and tickets are $7 
person. Reservation^ are 
necessary. For infor- 
mation, call 490-1221 . 




eum Bemfit 



mi 



Ifing Winners Announced 



The First Annual Spring 
Golf Tournament spon- 
sored by the Occanfront 
Jayi^ for the benefit of 
the Virginia Museum of 
Marine Science was recen- 
Jy held at HeU's Point 
Golf Course. Event 
chairman Woody Mc- 
I>oweU call^ the tour- 
i»ment a suo^ss and an- 



nounced the following 
three top foursomes and 
other winners: 

FInt Pkm: Lane AgM. 
Joe Borat, George 
Fischer, and Earl Bowden. 

Second Place: Archie 
McDowell, Sonny 
Malbon, Pat Kavanaugh, 
and Mike Dills. 

S««OOLFINO,Page5 



Mary Anne Kennedy, 
CPA of Goodman & C«n- 
pany and George Rice, 
Vice President of United 
Virginia Bank on June 8; 
and "i^titudc - A Key to 
Success in Management 
and Sales," with CNck 
Lcrfir of the Institude - A 
Key to Success in Man- 
agement and Sales." with 
Dick Lcrfur of the Institute 
of Management and Sales 
Techniques, Inc., on June 
22. 

The cost fw the five- 
prc^ram seminar series is 
$40 fw Chamber mem- 
bers. Individual seminar 
costs are $15 for members 
and $23 for non-members. 

Over 82 individuals 
participated in cxie or 
more of the seminars dur- 
ing last falls 's seminar 
series, according to 
Krieger. 

"It's aiv excellent 
(^portunity ffx the small 
-to-medium sized busi- 
ness owner (x manager to 
fill in some (rf those gaps 
in their expertise at an 
extremely low cost," says 
Krieger, of the series. He 
noted that many partid- 
pants achieved actual 
cash savings, either 
through tax savings or 
avoiding unnecessary 
expenditures. Others took 
the ideas they learned at 
the seminars and were able 
to apply them to their own 
firm for direct positive 
gains, he added. 

All five seminars are 
currently scheduled to be 
held in the Conference 
Room at the Chamber 
building at 4512 Virgima 
Beach Boulevard. The 
sessions start at 7:45 a.m. 
with coffee and danish, 
and are usually (xropleted 
by 9:30 a.m. 

For ffilditional infomui- 
tion and reservations, call 
the Chamber at 490-1221. 



liMH^MHaH 



■■■■I 



wmm 



m 



2 Virginia Beach Sun, April 20, 1983 

Sun Commentary 



"•;ii 



.€^ 



f 



Editorials 



McClanan And 4-H 



"Glenn is a favorite native son of Prin- 
cess Anne County and the City of Virginia 
Beach, having earned this recognition as a 
citizen, a 4-H member, a 4-H All Star, 
and an International Farm Youth Ex- 
change Delegate. 

**He is held in high esteem by his 
associates in business, by members of 
organizations in which he has held leader- 
ship positions, and by the Virginia 
General Assembly. This high recognition 
was recently culminate by his appoint- 
ment to the Chairmanship of the House 
Agricultural Committee. 

* 'Glenn has not forgotten 4-H, and he 
continuously strives to give back a portion 
of what 4-H gave to him. It was my great 
pleasure to personally nominate him as an 
IF YE delegate, and I continue in this 
honor by nominating Glenn Brooks Mc- 
Clanan for the State 4-H Alumni 
Award. '' - E. R. Cockrell, Jr., 4-H Unit 
Chairman; Director of Agriculture, City 
of Virginia Beach 

Corn, Peas, Livestock 

Little did the former member of the 
Court House Elementary School 4-H 
Club know that as an adult, he would be 
so highly thought of by local and state 
agriculture ofHcials. But McClanan's 
laurels did not just grow on the vine. He 
earned them. 

McClanan, now a 12 year General 
Assembly veteran, has been involved in 4- 
H since about the time he was old enough 
to say it. His mother, Gertrude McClanan 
was a teacher at Court House Elementary 
and was also a 4-H volunteer . 

According to a state nomination form 
for the 4-H alumni award McClanan, 
while as an early 4-H club member living 
in rural Princess Anne County, was active 
in 4-H gardening projects, especially 
corn, peas and livestock. He was "par- 
ticularly outstanding" in the 4-H stefcr 
program as well as public speaking. He 
was tapped into the Virginia Chapter of 4- 
H All Stars in 1950. In 1956, McClanan 
was appointed as an IFYE delegate to 
Israel. He lived there with a 4-H host 
family, and after returning home "he did 
an outstanding job of sharing his IFYE 
experience in Israel with the people of 
Princess Anne County." 

McClanan was reportedly "an e»;ellent 



example of a 4-H teen leader, often 
helping 4-H members with their project 
books and providing transportation for 
club members. 

McClanan's love for 4-H didn't stop 
there. 

He has been a long time supporter of 
the local 4-H program, often being the 
speaker at 4-H events and activities. He 
has been a judge at local 4-H contests, 
and was awarded the Outstanding 4-H 
Alumni Award in 1979. McClanan's 
family has hosted IFYE delegates from 
Germany, 1971, and from Norway, 1979. 
He has attended several state and national 
IFYE conferences," and was the keynote 
speaker at the 1975 4-H All Star Interstate 
Conference which was hosted that year in 
Virginia Beach. As a member of the 
House of Delegates, McClanan keeps a 
watchful eye on bills affecting farmers as 
well as consumers. For the past three 
years he has hosted 4-H field trips to the 
Virginia General Assembly, involving 4-H 
club members from all over the city. 



Chairman, Award Recipient 

4-H involvement consumes but one 
portion of McClanan's life. His devotion 
and unselfishness to it does not just reflect 
his commitment to 4-H, but rather, it is a 
reflection of the man. 

McClanan has often been hailed as a 
champion of people's rights, even if at 
times, hehas taken actions in tl)e name of 
public interest which did not always fall 
into the good graces of city council. Case 
in point, calling for mandatory public 
hearings before school board appoint- 
ments are made, without conferring with 
council members' flrst. 

Nevertheless, McClanan's reputation, 
integrity, and honest public image has 
prevailed throughout his professional 
career. His being named chairman of the 
Agricultureal Committee is indeed an 
honor, and also a feather in Virginia 
Beach's cap. This June in Richmond he 
will be formally honored as the recipient 
of the State 4-H Alumni Award. Again, 
another shining star in his career. 

It must always be remembered. When 
one of Virginia Beach's public officials or 
private residents is recognized for his or 
her achievements, not only does that in- 
dividual benefit, but so does the entire 
city. — G.D.G. 



Vision 



t 



In newspapering, as in any business, 
one must have vision. A clear view of the 
past allows one to learn from enors. A 
view of present lends itsdf to evaluation. 
A view of the future, is the ultimate 
realization of hopes and dreams. 

In addition to having vision in business, 
vision must also apply to the imiividual. 
An individual or company without vision 
loses motivation. The key to motivation is 
understanding. The key to understanding 
is perspective. 

Some people are afraid to change. 
Others embrace it passionately. If vision 
is coupled with change, it should lead to 
progress. If change occurs without vision, 
what's the worth? If we don't process, 
what's the use? 



Changes, or even modifications are of- 
ten accompanied by pain and discussion. 
No person, city, c»unty, state or nation 
should fear chaise. Our only fear should 
be complacwicy. The way to overcome 
that fear is with vision. 



As Virginia Beach prepares to celebrate 
its 20th birthday, its people and leaders 
must exp^ many change; and not be 
afraid to speak up for them. As the 
sayings so, "all things must pass," 
"nothing suys the same." But in the 
proMSS of pursuing prc^os, let Ic^c and 
reason be victorious over emotion. 
—G.D.G. 



Voice Of The People 



Should The Navy Station Us Fleet Of Air Cushion Assault Vehicles In Virginia Beach? 




'Wo. My son Uves on 
the beach at Croatan. I 
think it would interfere 
with the swimming and 
boating. The planes going 
overhead are bad 
enough. " 

Ruth Barr, 

housewife 

Three year resident 



''Sure. I'd be In favor if 
il dites the Navy any good. 
They need everything they 
can gel; anything for 
protection." 

Wade Doughtie, 

retired, 

Richmond, Va. 



"// depends on how 
necessary It is. If it's not 
that necessary they 
shouldn't do it. I don't 
think it's good for attrac- 
ting tourists or anyone. ' ' 
Mn.CeUiCablier, 
video producer 
14 year resident 



"No. I don't really 
think so, if the noise level 
is as bad as they say ii is. 
The noise from the airfield 
b bad enough." 

Alvin Young, 

library courier 

five year resident 



During 



Library 
SUHIines 

tf Vk^ Im^ LttnfiM OmM 




This week, i^ril 18-23, the Virginia Beach Public 

Library joins libraries throughout the country in 

celebrating the 26th annual National library Week. In 

early December, library staff members began to 

explore ideas for a major program series that would 

highlight the impOTtance of the library in the 

community. The staff also wanted the event to be an 

official observance of the twentieth anniversary of the 

merger of Virginia Beach and Princess Anne County. 

Although this was asking alot from a single week of 

i«^ts. the library hfs namaged to^tevehjp a m^- 

l^val meeting thete febjectives by utiUriig^^ 

'(^aiming resources of Cultural Experien<^ Unliinttett 

and by using funds provided by the Friends of the 

Virginia Beach Public Library. The results is a calalcade 

of ccMitemporary arts programs which arc being held in 



all five Virginia Beach Area Libraries this week. These 
programs, which feature Tidewater artists describing 
and demonstrating their most contemporary work, 
reOect not only the National Ubrary Week slogan Go 
Fot It" but also acknowledges the youthfulness and 
vitality of Virginia Beach-now twenty years young. 

The lineup of pr(«rams being offered this week is 
truely amazing. The Virginia Stage hiterns have 
presented a children's theatre production, while poet 
Doug Pilley and local teens have combined talents to 
write a poem celbrating the Oty's birthday. Composer 
B. J. Leiderman and other young adults are currently in 
the process of conposing an official theme song for the 
Virginia Beach libraries. By the end of the week, noted 
iUustratw KeUy Freas will have lectured cm science 
fiction ait; Rita Rawls will have demaistrated coiled 
basketry; Qirlton Abbott will have discussed the state 
of modem architecture; members of Chrysler Muse- 
um's Photography AUiancc will have presented a slide 
lecture; and the Tidewater Quilter's Guild will have 
demonstrated the art of quilting. On Friday night, 
world-famous artist Fay ZeUin will lecture on the fusion 
•of historic cave paintings with computer images. Fot/ 
children, Uie week ends with puppetry by Ktds on the 
'Block and stoif ««»« bji.JJ»«^oi^in« Cimpany,^^ 

TTie week is literaUy an explosion of events intended 
to show the library's commitment to the cultural life of 
Virginia Beach during this year of celebrations. 



itm 



Letters To The Editor 



Valuable Contribution 

Editor: 

On behalf of the Arts Center, I'd Hke to express our 
gratitude for a recent story entitled "Navaho Rugs" 
that ran on the editorial page of the April 6 issue of the 
Sun. IndMd, this sort of recognition is always ap- 
preciated. Furthermore, I'd like to thank you for the ex- 
cellent coverage of our events and the generous amount 

Racial Balancing Act 

Editor: 

Headlines, 6 p.m. news and other media are causing 
me much weariness in just trying to be a human. We 
fead and hear, "Black Mayor," "Black lawyer,' White 
Uiat" and on and on. 

I have lived in five states, from Virginia to Cahforma. 
Granted, there is prejudice everywhere regarding 
everyone and everything. Why, though, do we have to 
point out all Uiis? I know it's more Uian just identity. 

I rcaUy don't care about race, creed, color or 
nationality. Let's identify mankind by his actions, 
achievements and generosity for his Fellow Man. 

We're killing ourselves with this racial balancing act. 
It will never work. Somewhere it was written that God is 
no respector of persons. Why should we differ from our 

creator? ^, „ ,, 

Norman Kello, 

Virginia Be»:h 



of newspaper space afforded our program. The Sun is a 
fine newspaper that serves the community well. The 
citizens of this area are indeed fortunate to have this 
essential media resource. 
Again, thanks for making a valuable contribution to 

OUT program. 

1 Sincerely, 

Frederick Schmid, 

Director^ 

' Virginia Beach Arts Center 



Freeze Support 



Editw: 

With both the United States and the Soviet Union 
already possessing nuclear weapons capable of 
destroying the world many times over, and with the 
crushing wwts of armaments preventing both nations 
from adequately meeting the needs of their disadvan- 
tage citizens, we see no excuse for either nation to 
produce more nuclear weapons. 

In Uie interest of all the world's people, both the 
living and the generations to come, we urge all citizens 
to give fuU aapjpoTt to the proposed nuclear freeze, as a 
first step away from nucloir disaster. 

Paula Kippard, clerk, 

Virginia Beach Friends Meeting 

Virginia Beach 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

The Vii^inta Beach Sun wdrames aiui momraies tettos to the ediUH' on any and all Virginia Beach 
issues, as weB u any oth«- issues, qurattons or c<»k«^ affectinf tte wdl being of Uie Virginia Beach 
community. Lett«s should be tjT?ed, double speucsed awi ii^iMk the writes a«me, address and telephone 
number. Mail lettcre to 7*e Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. RdOBODt Road. Vvginia Beach, Va. 23452. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

138 Sooth RoseiBont Rmul, Vir^ula BcKh, Vs. 234S2 Phone (804) 486-3430 
USPS-660-140; PuNbhtd WcdMsdajn 




GrcgGeMfwfc 
E4Mor 



W. CMrd, &. 
GcacnriMaMver 



Within Ti^w^Aret 

OneYear-$9 

AUCXto^Aras 

OKYear-Sn 

TwoY^i-S17 

SecmKi Oan Pi»tage if paM tf Lyaotei^i ^tticn, 

Virgiiua Bndi. Vi^Ui 

7»* »»fMa ««a^ Am Ii a Mcnkcr of nc Vkilili 1 



•fCMMMICC 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 20, 1983 3 



Virsinia Beach Sun Bulletin Board 



Mail Mv» to TlM Vii^nla Brach Shb, 13S S. RmcmmI 
Road, Virgiaia Beach, Va. 23452 



^ CIVIC 



CItyltosdt Vc 

The Mental Retardation/ Developmental 
Disabilities Program of Virginia Beach is presently 
in need of volunteers to help in the following 
areas: 

•To work directly with mentally disabled 
children and adults on a one-to-one basis in 
recreation and leisure activities. Both male and 
female volunteers are needed. 

•To be a tutor for a young man preparing for 
hisGED. 

•Clerical help in all phases of the program. 

For further information contact Hannah Her- 
ward, Volunteer Co-ordinator at 499-7$l9. 



Jay ^-,- 

The City of Virginia Beach will hold a Public 
Workshop on Monday, May 2, oft the Back Bay 
Watershed Management Plan. Sponsored by the 
Mayor's Back Bay Study Committee and the 
City's consultant Roy Mann Associates, Inc., the 
workshop will be held at 7 p.m. in the City Coun- 
cil Chambers, City Hall Building, Virginia Beach 
Municipal Center. 

The first in a series of workshops, the purpose 
of the workshop is to provide an overview of the 
project, to outline the work schedule and time 
frame for the project, and to enumerate the areas 
of concern being addressed by this study. 

Interested citizens and groups arc encouraged to 
provide input. For further information, contact 
Jack Whitney at the Plamung Department at 427- 
4621 or the Back Bay Management Project Office 
at 427-4495. — - 



The Virginia Beach Chamber of Commerce, 
Small Business Council, has announced its Spring 
Seminar Series. 

Series topics include sales promotions, tax 
planning, personnel, recoredkecping and 
borrowing, and attitude. 

The discussions will take place on Wednesday 
nights, April 27 through June 22, from 7:45 to 
^ 9:45 at the conference room at the Chamber of- 
fice, 45 1 2 Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

Coffee and danish ;will be served. A fee is 
charged. 

Call 490-1221 for more information. 



i-Mumiuu 3vu'j an 



Members of Preceptor Alpha Xi Chapter of 
Beta Sigma Phi will meet at Cisco's Cafe at 6 p.m. 
on Thursday, April 21, to begin the celebration of 
our Woman of the Year, Diana Pettit. Uter the 
members will continue the celebration and the 
business meeting at the home of Judy Holland, 
833 Earl of Chesterfield Drive. 

An attendance count will be taken for the 
Founder's Day Banquet, sponsored by the 
Tidewater City Council of Beta Sigma Phi, on 
Thursday, April 28. at the Holiday Inn Executive 
Center. Final plans will be made for "A Very 
Merry Unbirthday Party" to be given for the 
children at Hope Haven on Tuesday, Apnl 29. 
Judy HbUand wiU present the cultural propam 
for the evening. 



1^ EDUCATIONAL 



CexBaadPiiMlKalsMF 

The Cox High School Band will hold a fund 
raiser on Saturday, April 30 between 10 a.m. and 
3 p.m. at the Great Neck Shopping Center. 

Entertainment will be provided by the school's 
concert and jazz bands. Hot dogs, sodas, cotton 
candy, popcorn, helium balloons and chocolate 
candy bars will be on sale. 

Proceeds will go to the band's uniform fund 

drive. , . . 

"The band will more than double its mwnbers 
next year in the new Cox High School and 
uniforms are a high priority." a Cox spokesman 

said. 
Call 486-3491 for more information. 



The Virginia BeaCh City Public Schools* 
Planetarium and the Back Bay Amateur 
AstronomCTS wiU sponsor a saies of cv«its in 
honor of "Astronomy Day," to be observed on 
Saturday. April 23, at the planetarium. 

The day includes telescopes on the lawns, 
weather permitting, from 2 to 5 p.m.; a special 
J show by planetarium director. Dt. CafI Sagan, in- 
titled "Cosmos: Voyage to the stars;" stargazing 
withtdescopes from 7 to 9 p.m.; and a repeat of 
the Hwctal show, frtwn 7 to 8 p.m. 

The public is welcome. The planetarium is 
located at Plaza Junior Hij^i Scho<ri. 

For more information call 486-1971 . 



The Virginia Beach Qty Public SchooU 
Planetarium public ^offtm tot May wiU be 
"From The Shadows Of The Pyiaowb.' 

Intriguing facts about the pyramids are 
revealed. Is iL a hu^ sundial whc»e sh«lows m- 
dicate the seasons and t» ta^ of ttey«r? Wa» 
the Great Pyramid of Chec^i biiilt by d^nmenu 



with certain staft; Does the shape of the pyramid 
have special powers over people and things? 

These questions and many more are entertained 
during the May program. 

Planetarium hours are: Sundays, 7 to 8 p.m., 
May 1, 8, 15, and 22; and Turadays, 8 p.m. to 8 
p.m.,May3, 10. 17,24,and31, 

No program will be given on Sunday, May 29. 

The planetarium seats 120 people and is easily 
accessible from the Route 44 toll road by taking 
the Lynnhaven exit (Exit 5) to the Lynnhaven 
Parkway and \urning right at the traffic light at 
the intersection of Lynnhaven Parkway and South 
Lynnhaven Road. Take South, Lynnhaven Road 
to the Plaza Junior High School, where the 
planetarium is located. 

Telephone the main office at Plaza Junior High 
School, 486-1971, for reservations. Admission is 
free. Children under age 12 may be refused ad- 
mission unless accompanied by a mature person. 



1^ ENTERTAINMENT 



. , .At 

The Children's Dance Theatre of Virginia 
Beach, located on South Lynnhaven Road, will 
present Mikhail Korogodsky to teach classes at the 

theatre. . ». j„„ 

Advanced ballet will be offered on Monday, 
April 25 add an advanced pointe class will be of- 
fered on Tuesday. April 26. Two character classes 
will be conducted on Wednesday and Thursday, 
April 27 and 28. . . . 

The classes are co-sponsored by the Virginia 
Ballet Theatre and the Children's Dance Theatre. 

Korogodsky is artistic director of the Virginia 
Ballet Theatre, and has recently taught classes in 
London and Paris. 

Call 340-1534 for more information or to 

register. 



II 



It 



Jean Brodle (played by Ann Hkks), speaks 
sternly lo her former lover, Teddy Uoyd (played 
by Butch Bryant), in the upcoming production, 
"The Prime of Miss Jean Brodk," to be presented 
at the Kenpsvillc Playhouse April 27 through May 
1. For more Information and reservations, please 
call 495-1892. «••• «»> D*"*** D«*'"* 



Pippin At Cox Hlffli 

Frank W. Cox High School will present this 
year's spring musical "Pippin." a musical comedy 
by Roger O. Hirson, music and lyrics by Steven 
Schwartz on Wednesday, April 27 through Satur- 
day. April 30. at the school auditorium. 

The story deals with the life of a young man, 
Pippin, as he makes his way through Medieval 
Franw during the reign of Charlemagne. The 
music is contemporary and the style of the play is 
improvisaUonal, which makea for an enjoyable 

time. 

Tickett are available through Cox High School. 
For more information, please contact the main of- 
fice at 481 -6^r7. 



t^ HEALTH 



Tfr 



Dr. Colin W. Hamihon, M.D., orthopedic 
surg«>n and Diplomat of the American Board of 
Orthof»^ic Surgeons, wUl deliver a lecture and 
slicte pf««ntation on Tuesday, April 26, at 7:30 
p.m. in the Great Neck Area Library (1251 Bayne 
EMve) in Vir^nia B«ch. 

R^ktmtton in »ivMis:eMvM«K«t Details and 
registratioo at 48 1 -6094. 



DtotlH«ll«lp 

Carolyn Colesar, a representative of a local 
supermarket chain, will provide tips on sensible 
weight loss programs and offer a sampling of low 
calorie recipes and dishes on Thursday, April 28, 
at 7: 15 p.m. in the Great Neck Area Library. 

Colesar is a 1978 graduate of Indiana University 
of Pennsylvania with a degr« in Dietetics. She 
brings to her lecture experience as a hospital 
dietary supervisor and a home management coun- 
selor. 

Registration in advance for Colesar's lecture is 
required. Interested adulu may register by calling 
the library at 481-6094. 



•iv« Blood At ftootock 

The American Red Cross bloodmobile will 
collect blood on Saturday, Ap/lt 23 at Seatack 
Community Center, 141 S. Birdneck Road, 2 p.m. 
to 8 p.m. 





HiNMiiiSorvkosPi 

A Human Services Forum will be held at the 
Cavalier Hotel in Virginia Beach Monday and 
Tuesday, April 25 and 26. The Forum is spon- 
sored jointly by the Virginia Human Services In- 
stitute and the Secretary of Human Resources for 
the Commonsealth of Virginia. 

Entitled "Human Services In Transition", the 
purpose of the Forum is to examine some of the 
changing roles and responsibilities affecting 
human service delivery. The opening address will 
be delivered by Governor Charles Robb who will 
highlight strategic human service issues facing 

Virginia. 

For further information regarding this Forum, 
contact Walter B. Credle, Chairman of the 
Virginia Human Services Institute, at the Virginia 
Beach Department of Social Services 486-7223. 



Child AInmo Sorvlcot 

The month of April is National Child Abuse 
Prevention Month. Child Abuse is a significant 
problem in Virginia Beach. 

Although child abuse is an important problem 
in itself, it signifies a large problem: family violen- 
ce. Child abuse frequently occurs in families that 
arc characterized by violence between parents 
(spouse abuse) as well as between parents and 
children. These families create an environment 
where chiWren^ were taught to exercise violence ^n 
their relationships )»rtth others. They grow up to be 
violent adults and the cycle is repeated. In ad- 
dition, these families present a danger to police of- 
ficers when the police are called to intervene. 

Services are available only when child abuse and 
neglect is reported. Child abuse and neglect is 
primarily the responsibility of the Department of 
Social Services. For assistance in Virginia Beach, 
contact INTERACT at 481-2828. 

Help is also available to families who are in 
need of this assistance. For further information 
regarding this problem, contact Ms. Kitty Hill, 
Virginia Beach Department of Social Service at 
486-7223. 



Homo NortliHI Covrto 

The American Red Cross, Tidewater Chapter in 
cooperation with General Hospital of Virginia 
Beach will offer a Home Nursing course on Mon- 
days and Wednesdays, 9 to 1 1 a.m. May 2 through 
May 25, 1983. 

Course content includes lifestyles promoting 
wellness, health maintenance, prevention of 
illness, signs and symptoms of illness, skills for 
caring for the ill at home, using medications 
correctly, basic nursing procedures and nutrition. 

The classes will be held at General Hcwpital of 
Virginia Beach, 1060 First Colonial Road in the 
Health Education activities Center. 

Course fee is $12.00 per person and includes the 
Home Nursing textbook. 

It is necessary to pre-register for this course by 
calling Rhonda Bailey at 499-23 1 1 . 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



Dokiwaro Choir At Chapol 

The Delaware County Christian Hiah School 
Choir, of Newtown Square, Pennsylvania, wiH be 
singing at the Virginia Beach Community Chapel, 
1261 Laskin Road on Sunday, April 29 at 6 p.m. 

Delaware County Christian School is an inter- 
denominational school with more than 720 
students who come from 140 churches in a five 
county area around Philadelphia. It is fully ac- 
credited and more than 90 perosnt of its grwiuates 
go on to college. 

The public is invitwl to the concert and child 
care will be provided. For more information, call 
the Community Chapel at 428-1881 . 



A paiwl discussiwi on the spiritual significance 
of dreams will be held at the Virginia B^ch Kem- 
psvUIe Recr«iuon Center, 800 Monmouth Lane, 
Virpma B«ch on April 21 at 8 p.m. in Room 111. 

The discussion is fr« and open to the public, 
and U sponsored by the ECKANKAR Center of 
Tidewater. For more information call 480-0661 . 



Show At PavNIoa 

The Second Annual Virginia/Carolinas Com- 
puter Show &. Office Equipment Exposition comes 
to the Virginia Beach Pavilion Convention Center. 
April 21-24. It will bring with it a wide variety of 
mini-courses and seminars, either free or at a 
nominal charge, to acquaint the visiting public 
with the latest trends in personal and business 
computers and software, and with the thousands 
of uses which they are capable. 

This year's exhibits will feature the latest 
products and services in hardware for business, 
industry, government, education, the professions, 
home and personal use, including micro and mini 
computers, word and data processors, graphics, 
peripherals, accessories, publications and support 
services. Specifically, Digital Application of 
Tidewater will feature the new Olivetti M20 per- 
sonal computer; Philips Information Systems will 
feature their MICOM 2002 word processing 
system; Unidyne will demonstrate the ever- 
popular Commodore 64 personal computer. 



Myotory Writor at O co«»fr o «t 

William Maner, author of mysteries, short 
stories and verse, will tell "Why The BuUer 
Doesn't Do It Anymore" in a lecture on Sunday, 
May 1, at 3 p.m. in the Oceanfront Area Library 

in Virginia Beach. u w^ • j „f 

Maner's lecture is sponsored by the Friends oi 
the Virginia Beach Public Library and is a part of 
the annual meeting of that group. Whether or not 
you arc a mystery enthusiast. Maner's description 
4>f contemporary mystery-writing will be 
provocative and refreshing. 

Registration for the lecture is free and reser- 
vations should be made in advance by calhng the 
Oceanfront Area Library at 428-41 13. A reception 
will follow the lecture. 



Bonofflt Boxing At Rofppo't 

Twelve rounds of amateur boxing has been 
scheduled at Rogue's on Thursday, April 21 
beginning at 8p.m. 

Proceeds from the 12-bout card, after expenses, 
with be donated to the United States Olympic 

Fund. 

The event is being produced by Chesapeake 
promoter Gerry Martin and Virginia Beach referee 
Al Roihenberg. 






MB Proo Throw thoot Bvt 

The Green Run High School Key Club will be 
sponsoring a free throw shoot out tournament on 
Saturday, April 23 at Pembroke Mall. There will 
be an entry fee of $1, which will go to benefit the 
Muscular Dystrophy Association. 

Everyone is eligible for prizes. For more infor- 
mation call 461-0177. 



Broad Bay C l oa o - U p 

The Broad Bay Garden Club will hold its annual 
Island Clean-Up Day on Saturday. April 23, 
during the observation of Clean Community 
Week by Greater Hampton Roads (April 25-23). 

Neighborhood children are invited to come and 
help "wave goodbye to litter." Prizes will be 
awarded for the most litter collected and delivered 
to the pool corner at noon on Saturday, April 23. 

For further information, contact Joan McCon- 
nel, 481-6949. 



Birchwood Loagoo M oo ti 

The Birchwood Civic League will sponsor a flea 
market at the Birchwood Shopping Center on 
April 30 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Proceeds will go to support civic league ac- 
tivities and the local little league. There will be • 
rain date of May I. 

There is no admission for buyers, but there is a 
fee for sellers. Information can be obtained from 
the following numbers: 340-3824 or 340-3242. 



,^ ANNOUNCEMENTS 



VBIA Offffkors lioctod 

Art Essenberg, Gary Bluroenstein, Rob Jtwies 
and Shirley Harley have b^n elected as 1983-84 
officers of the Virginia Beach Education 
Association. 

Esenberg, who will serve as presideiit, u a 
physical education teacher and PTA president at 
Pembroke Elementary School. 

Blumenstein, a social studies teacher at KemfM 
Lai^i« School, was elated vice-president. 

UxM^ an English t«Kher at lndq>«^iice 
Junior High School, and Harley, a second gra<te 
teacher at Arrowhead Elementary Schotrf, will be 
treasurer and s«:retary respectively. 

The Virginia B^h Education AssodaAw, 
with 2,200 meml«rs, represents the school 
system's teachers, aicte, Jiurs« and (»ych(AitiM. 



•^ 



■■«■■■■ 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, April 20. 1983 



Yirqinia Beach City Council ByLMCahm 



pi 



Beach Council Actions 



Council Considers 




Quarterly Meetings With Legislators ? 



JotaA 
■hckwater 



NaM7A.Cfcccli BMlmraM.Hciricy HaroM Hebcbobcr H. JackJnaiHi 

At-Lufc Vmmgt Al-Ur«e Lyanhavc* 



Le«ltR.JoMi 






Rokcrt G. Joac* 
Al-Lar|c 



W.H.IUIcUB,in 
Vlr^iria Beach 



S.McCluaB 
PfteccMAaae 



J. Hcaiy McCoy, Jr. 

KdHIMvillc 



Mcycra OhcrMlorf 
Al-Lar|c 



Meeting Date: Monday, April 18, 1983. Legblative Woriuhop 9 a.m. Creech, Kitchin McOanan, McCoy 
absent. Joint meeting of Qty Council and local representatives to the General Assembly to discuss better 
ways off working together. 



i^ Budget Workshop ioa.>i. 

Presentations by Cominissioner of the Revenue, City 
Treasurer, Social Services Bureau director. Sheriff, library 
director. 

* Informal Session 

12:30 p.m. AU Present 



Chanses in proposed ordinaitce discussed. 



City Manager Thomas H. Muehknbeck announces that 
third requested extension for removal of fire-damased struc- 
tures in the Beach Borough was not authorized. 



City Traffic Engineer John Herzke presents proposal to 
coordinate beach traffic pattern with one-way plan for feeder 
roads on Virginia Beach Boulevard being considered by the 
CityofNorfcrik. 



Discussion of items to remove frcmi the Consent Agenda. 



Discussion of efforts to coordinate construction in the resort 
area with off-seasons. 

if Executive Session 1.35 p.m. 
it Formal Session 

2:25 p.m. All members present 



Resolution in Recognition: Virginia Beach Qean CcHn- 
rauaity 

• Consent Agenda 

•Resolution in Reci^nition - Virginia Beach Qean Com- 
munity. ApuH'oved 1 1-O. 

•Roolution authorizing the City Manage to eaia into a 
contract for an independent audit of the City of Virginia Beach 
for the Fiscal Year emling June 30, 1983. (This matter was 



deferred on March 28, 1983. April 4, 1983 and for at least one 
week on April 1 1 . 1983.) Approved 8-3. Jennings, McClanan, 
Oberndorf dissenting. 

•Resolution authorizing the City Attorney and the City 
Manager to make application to the Virginia Department of 
transportation Safety for sufficient funds to allow R. J. Nutter 
11, Assisunt City Attorney, to attend the Projp'am of Instruc- 
tion for Lawyers Program (P.I.L.). Approved 11-0. 

•Ordinance to amend and reordain Section 6-6 of the Code 
of the City of Virginia Beach pertaining to taking food or drink 
on beach or adjacent streets. (This matter was deferred on 
April 1 1 , 1 983). Approved 11-0. 

•Ordinance, on second reading, to accept grants totaling 
$34,854 from the Virginia Department of Transporution 
Safety and to appropriate these funds. Approved 11-0. 

•Ordinance, on first reading, to exempt the Community 
Development Program from indirect costs as determined by the 
C(»t Allocation Plan for Program Years 3-8. Approved 1 1-0. 

•Ordinance, on first reading, to increase estimate revenues 
and transfer Capital Project funds for street improvements to 
the 100 block of 68th Street. Approved 1 1-0. 

•Ordinance authorizing the City Manager to vacate a 10' 
drainage easement to Amterra Partners New Lease Fund I, 
across Parcel A-3, 5277 Princess Anne Road, KempsviUe 
Borough (Pizza Hut of America, Inc.) Deferred one week . 

•Resolution authorizing an addition to a nancooforining 
stnicture known as Steinhilber's Thalia Acres Inn located at 
653 Thalia Road. Approved 11-0. 

•Ordinance to authorize acquisition of property in fee simple 
for right-of-way of Princess Anne Road Project Phase II 
Water Main Project ClP-937 and the acquisition of temporary 
and permanent easements of right-of-way, either by agreement 
or by condemnation. Approved 1 1-0. 

•Ordinance appointing viewen in the petition of Lynn Beach 
Associates for the closure of a portion of Kleen Street and 
Holly Avenue (a/k/a Cape Henry Drive) (Lynnhaven 
Borough). Approved 1 1-0. 

•Ordinance authwizing and directing the City Treasurer to 
exKute and file for exemption from Federal withholding on in- 
terest under the Federal Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility 
Act of 1982 with the Internal Revenue Service. Approved 1 1-0. 

•Request of the City Treasurer for tax refunds in the amount 
of $813.87. Approved 11-0. 

•Raffie Permiu: Virginia Brach Little League, Cox Higii 
School Band Parents, Deputy Sheriffs Association and 
Virginia Beach Association for Gifted and Talented. Approved 
1 1-0. 

See COUNCIL, Page 5 



Quarterly meetings 
between N^i^inia Beach 
Qty Council and the city's 
representatives to the 
General Assembly may 
better serve the dty's 
interests, Del. W.R. 
"Buster" aBrien said 
Monday afternoon. 

At a meeting of the two 
grou|» Monday morning 
he said that in the past the 
local and state legulators 
have met sometime be- 
tween November and Jan- 
uary before the General 
Assembly session. 
O'Brien said this was too 
late to allow for much 
imput in legislation. He 
suggested instead that the 
two bodies meet on a 
quarterly basis to lay the 
groundwork for legisla- 
tion. 

O'Brien also said that 
Virginia Beach, as a 
rapidly growing city 
would benefit more if 
fmancial formulas were 
based on a year-to-year 
basis, rather than the 
ten-year census. 

Del. J. William O'Brien 



Jr. . told Council that 
efforts are being made to 
bring the meeting of the 
Southern Legislators 
Council to Virginia Beach. 
He said that the organiza- 
tion has 1500 members 
frwn 17 states. The 
$50,000 cost to bring the 
group here would be off- 
set, he said, by registra- 
tion fees and corporate 
contributions. 

Mayor Louis R. Jones 
said a resdution would be 
prepared stating the city's 
interest in having the 
meeting here. 

Del. Owen Pickett said 
that when local legislators 
wait until the seaxid week 
in January to make propo- 
sals in the General 
Assembly, they are miss- 
ing the boat and that 1984 
promises to be an impor- 
tant legislative session. 

Councilman Jdin A. 
Baum, who has been on 
Council since 1972, said 
that he has noted the 
steady trend toward a 
full-time Council. Part of 
the problem with this is 



that it is an $8,000-a-year 
job, he said, with no 
expenses except for 
mileage, and no retire- 
ment benefits. Under the 
circumstances, he said, 
extra meetings may add 



m 
D 

ideas but without coiab 
deraUon for the tirod 
taken. He said he disafe 
greed with a fiill-tinB 
Council at present, but he 
is against having moiid 
meetings. ni 

ill 

'JO 
B 





Watch Us Growl 



We invite our friends and neighbors lo mil us and 
watch the progress, of ournew garden center. We thank 
all our friends for their continued patronage and sup- 
port. 

AzalMS 20% Off Dogwooda 

Undscapo Shrubs ^"'^ °!* . 

■ Red. White & Pink 




4934 High St. West 
Rt. 17, Churchland 
Portsmouth, Va 2370 
484-3426 



It 



Gun Discussion 



Continued from Page 1 

bear arms, Baum said that 
people with handguns are 
not going to be called up 
by the militia. He said 
that the purpose originally 
Was to permit shop 
keepers and farmers guns 
to fight insurrections and 
Indians. "That made 
some sense," be said. 

Gty Manager Hiomas 
H. Muehlenbeck said he 
would hust the cb|ef pre- 
sent a report. 

Present for the diiscus- 



sion was the Rev. George 
Stallings, pastor of the 
First Colonial Baptist 
Church, who has qpposed 
the gun law aci the basis of 
the right guaranteed by 
the second amendment. 

Many of the <*jecta^ to 
the ordinance dcxi't want 
any contrd at all. Others 
want the ordinance 
watered down enough so 
that it would be as easy to 
purchase- a: haadgiui<' in 
Virginia B^adi as any of 
its neighboring dties. 



Beacher Receives Award 



Virginia Be«:h mident 
Kimberla French has been 
named a recipient of Old. 
Dominion University's 
1983-84 Stamos Voice 
Scholarship. 

The scholarship, which 
covers the full cost of, 
tuition, is award«l an- 



nually to a full-time music 
(najor who demonstrates 
outstanding vocal ability. 
It is renewable «u;h year 
by a committee vote. 

French, of 5408 Glamis 
Court, will enter ODU this 
fall as a freshman. 




SUPERIOR 
BUILDERS 



Specializing in Porch 

Enclosures & Florida Rooms 

also 

•Custom Room Adttttlons i.' :^ 

•Room Addition Sliells 

•Bathroom Remodeling •Garages 

•Vinyl & Aluminum Siding 

•Masonry Fireplace •Solar & Glass Rooms 

• AU Types Concrete Work •Termite Dama] 

•Moisture Control 

O VER 20 YRS. EXPERIENCE i STATE REG 



\ 



FREE ESTIMATES 422-050( 



Detox 

Location 
Set 

The city's Detoxific- 
ation Center will be 
locat^l on a site provided 
by the Open Door Chapel 
on Virginia Beach 
Boulevard. 

Virginia Beach City 
Council Monday after- 
noon granted a con- 
ditional use permit for the 
center operated by the 
Community Services 
Soard. The program has. 
een awarded SI 20.000 in 
tmonstration funding. 

A modular, pre-fab 

.ilding will be located on 
29,5%.50 square foot 

/eel south of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard and east 
of Croveland Road in the 
Lynnhaven Borough. 




MICHAEL F. 

FASAN ARO, MR, 

AttoTMy 
AtUw 

5 KogCT Exa utive CentCT 
SUITE 220 

Norfoh, Va. 23502 




We. the Board of Directors of Smith and Williams Homes want to assure you its staff is alwa)^ available to 
personally serve you in your time of bereavement and need. It is our policy at Smith and Williams to serve 
the faoniily with dignity, give advice when desired and to comply with all personal wishes. We invite you to 
pcrsoa^ di»niss any questions you may have regarding all aspects of Pre-arrangoDait planning with no 




Kemf^ville Chapel 




Gmtatmrnrnx 





Kempsvilk Chapel 

48t9 Princes Anne Rd. 

Va. Beach, VA 23456 



Smith & Williams 

FUMULHOM 

490-2727 





mmm: 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 20. 1983 5 



Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 




Beach, Norfolk Meet Halfway? 



Virginia Beach is think- 
ing about meeting the 
Gty of Norfolk partway 
down Virginia Beach 
Boulevard to accommo- 
date traffic changes con- 
tnnplated by Norfdk. 
.Gty Manager Thomas 
IL Muehlenbeck said that 
in the interest of regiona- 
lism his staff is working 
out a plan to conform with 
a traffic plan which Nor- 
Mk tKpecis to put into 
fffect CO the feeder roads 
Ikxix the Boulevard. 
I Qty Traffic Engineer 
iohn Herzke presented 
Be staffs proposal at an 
Bformal meeting of Gty 
ibuncil Monday after- 

^1. No action will be 
n until after a public 
Searing on both the Nor- 



fork and Virginia Beach 
plans. 

Herzke said that Nor- 
folk plans to make the 
feeder lanes one way to 
the city limit at Newtown 
Road. To make the transi- 
tion easier, Norfolk asked 
the coc^ ration of Vir- 
ginia Beach. Herzke's 
plan is to continue om- 
way feeder roads to Fair 
Meadows Drive and to 
provide a turn-around in 
the middle of the block. 

Councilman Dr. J. 
Henry McCoy Jr. said that 
everytime the city 
tampers with a feeder 
road, it has alot of trouble. 

Herzke said that the 
service roads are a night- 
mare anyway and two-way 
service roads are a double 



CONSIGNMENT 

AUCTION 

Sat., ApriU3, 1983 - 10:30 A.M. 

TRACTORS - TRUCKS - EQUIPMENT 

Dir: Hwy. 168, 10 miles N. of N.C. State Line, Hickory Section of 

Chesapeake, Va. at Hickory - Look for signs and follow 4 miles to our 

auction yard at address below: 

21 DIESEL AND GAS TR ACTORS 

■---—--——-'^ (10hp-l40hp) ^*~ ' ' -^ ■ , . 

JD, INT'L., Case, Fords, Massey-Fergusoil, Olivers. 

22 GAS AND DIESEL TRUCKS 

Grain and dirt dumps, flats, pickups, 10-wheelers and road tractors. 

10 TRAILERS 

Grain, flats, vans, reefers and tag-a-longs 

200 ITEMS OF EQUIPMENT 

Plows, middle busters, disc harrows, planters, bedders, cultivators, rotary 
mowers, drain diggers, feed grinders, grader blades, hay balers, grain cleaners, 
liquid and dry fertilizer rigs, grain drills, farm trailers, gates, (50) irrigation 
sprinklers, water pumps, stump grinders, hay loaders, plus nails, bolts, tools, 
new roofmg tin, lumber, wire and other items. 
If yon need good one row to 6 row equipment plus tractors and tracks these 

consignon want to sell. DON'T MISS THIS SALE! 
TERMS: Cash or Check, Sale Rain or Shine. j 34Q j^ead of River Road 
Call or Write for Brochure. Chesapeake, Va. 23322 

JACK PEOPLES (804)421-2525 

Bonded Aucitoneer N.C.A.L. #1517 



CARRIER, 
HELP! 

2 Reasons m 

To Buy Carrier 

Cooling NOW! 




1. Savings 

Get the year's best prices 
plus high efficiency to cut your 
cooling costs. 

2. FREE 

With the purchase of a Carrier 
Air Conditioning or Heat 
Pump. We hand you a line with 
no strings attached — a Uniden 
Model EX3000 Cordless 
Telephone Free! 

Builders, developers not 
.eligible. 

One per customer. 




Financing Now Available^ 



SALES • SERVICE* REPAIRS 
SPECIALIZING IN HEAT PUMPS 
SHEET METAL WORK 
SERVICE CONTRACTS 



CALL TODAY FOR A FREE EVALUATION 

OF YOUR HOME 

Find out how much a Carrier heaipump can save you, 

547-4444 

AMPMOR ELECTRIC CORP, 



^^ 123 Wayne Ave. » Gre»l Bridge » CliegapMke 



nightmare. He said that 
none of the businesses 
will be adversely affected 
because a left-hand turn 
lane wiU be included in 
the plan. 

Norfolk would inducte 
the Be«^ changes as 
l»rt of the Norfolk proiea 
which is a state project 
requiring five percent 
local participation. Nor- 
folk is going to synchro- 
nize its lights from New- 
town R<»d to Broad 
Street, he said. The whole 
plan will be open to public 
imput, he said, and Coun- 
cil can reserve comment. 

Councilman Jack Jen- 
nings Jr. suggested 
querying ten or 12 busi- 
nesses. 



Council Actions 

Continued from Pije 4 

if Planning Items 

Pliuilng Items By CoBicni 

•AppUcmtion of Ronald S. Brav for a variance to Section 
4.4<d) of the Subdivision Ordinance which requires that loU 
created through subdivision have direct access to a public 
street. He wishes to subdivide a 5 9acre parcel off of a larger 
297-acre tract. The site, known as Bayville Farm, is located 
6,418. 31-feet east of the intersection of First Court and Green- 
well Roads (Bayside Borough). (City Counil voted to expedite 
on 2/14/83.) Letter from the City Manager transmiu the 
rcctMiiiacfldation of the Planning Commission for approval. 
Approved 11-0. 

•Application of Waco Equipment Company for a con- 
ditional use permit for a bulk storage yard on a 1 .64-acre parcel 
located at the northwest corner of Rouse Drive and Mac Street 
(Kempsville Borough). Letter from the City Manager transmiu 
the recommendation of the Planning commission for approval. 
Aptvoved 11-0. 

•Application of the City of Virginia Beach, Department of 
General Services, for a conditional use permit for a sanitarium 
(non-medical environmental alcohol detoxifiwtion center) on a 
29,5%-50-square foot parcel located south of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, east of Groveland Road (Lynnhaven Borough). 
Approved 1 1-0 and, a Resolution authorizing the City Manager 
to enter into a lease agreement between the Open Door Chapel 
and the City of Virginia Beach. (On March 14, 1983. the City 
Counci voted to expedite this application.) Letter from the City 
Manager transmits the recommendation of the Planning 
Commission for approval. Approved ll-O. 

•Application of Runnington Investment Corporation for a 
change of zoning from 1-1 Light Industrial District to B-4 
Resort-Commercial District on a 6,381 -square foot parcel 
located along the south side of Pinewood Drive, west of 
Mediterranean Avenue (Virginia Beach Borough). (This matter 
was deferred for two weeks on April 4, 1983.) Letter from the 
City Manager transmits the recommendation of the Plarming 
Commission for approval. Approved 10- 1 . Jennings absent. 

•Application of S & B Propel-ties, Inc. for a change of 
zoning from R-8 Residential District to B-2 Community- 



Business District on a |.06-acre parcel located along the west 
side of Centerville Turnpike, south of Kempsville Road (Kem- 
sville Borough). Letter from the City Manager transmits the 
recommendation 01 the Planning Commission for denial. Ap- 
proved 6-5. Baum. Creech, Henley, R. Jones, Oberndorf 
dissenting. 

•Application of Holland Properties Associates for a change 
of zoning from 1-1 Light Industrial District to A-3 Apartment 
District on a 4.5-acre parcel located north of Holland Road, 
west of Edwin Drive (Kempsville Borough). Letter from the 
City Manager transmits the recommendation of the Planning 
Commission for denial. Deferred back to Planning Com- 
mission. 11-0. 

•Application of R. G. moore for a change of zoning from R- 

5 Residential District to R-5 Residential District on a 66.2-acre 
parcel located along the west side of Salem Road, north of 
Elbow Road (Kempsville Borough). Letter from the City 
Manager transmits the recommendation of the Planning com- 
mission for approval. Approved ll-O. 

•Application of R. G. Moore for a change of zonmg from R- 

6 Residential District to O-l Office District on a 2.1 1 -acre par- 
cel located along the south side of Bonney Road, east of Witch- 
duck Road (Kempsville Borough). Letter from the City 
Manager transmits the recommendation of the Planning com- 
mission for denial. Denied 1 l-O.tl. 

• Unfinished Business 

•Motion by Councilman R. Jones to reconsider rezoning ap- 
plication to Margaret R. Mills and Garphine E. Smith for 
property at Lawrence Drive and Daniel Smith Road from R-6 
to A- 1 in the Newsome Farm area, Bayside Borough; approved 
last week by a vote of 6-5. Approved for reconsideration in two 
weeks 6-4. Baum Jennings, L. Jones, McCoy dissenting; 
Creech absent. 

•Motion by Councilman R. Jones to reconsider Newsome 
Farm Association Subdivision variance at Connie Lane and 
Lawrence Drive; denied last week by a vote of 9-2. Denied 2-8; 
R. Jones, McClanan approving; Creech absent. 

• Meeting adjourned 

5:45 p.m. 



^ape Henry Women Sponsor Sugar Tree 



The Sugar Plum Tree 
Shop will be sponsored 
again this year by the 
Cape Henry Women's 



Club and co-sponsored by 
the Virginia Beach Depar- 
tment of Parks and 
Recreation. It will be 



Golfing Winners Named 



Continued from Page I 
Third Place: Keith 
Waterhouse, Dicke 
Poland, Bill Findlcy, and 
Nelson Belts. 

Last Place: Lewis Hub- 
bard, Tom Plunders, Joe 
Eitimonds, and Doc 
Schaff. 



Closest to the Hole: 

Sonny Malbon (which was 
a hole in one on the 1 Ith). 

Longest Drive: Howard 
Burke (on 18th). 

Friends of TItlist: Bob 
Slant (loser of most golf 
balls on course). Florida 
Best Ball rules applied. 



located in the cafeteria of 
Virginia Beach Junior 
High School, 600 24th 
Street, Virginia Beach and 
open to the public July 8 
thru July 14 from 10 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. Mrs. James L. 
Craig, Jr. will serve as 
chairman and Mrs. Hugh 
W. Tribble items by senior 
citizens. 

"We are inviting artists 
and craftsmen in the area 
to participate on a con- 
signment basis. We are in- 
terested in quality, 
originality, and variety. 
Paintings, needlework, 
ceramics, sculpture, metal 
art, wood art, plants, etc. 



,YNNHAVEN^ 



PHIIUPS 



are desired," a club 
spokesman said. 

Merchandise will be 
received only on Wed- 
nesday, July 6, from 10 
a.m. to 4 p.m. and Thur- 
sday, July 7, from 10 a.m. 
to 4 p.m. 

For further information 
and pre-rcgistration senior 
citizens may contact Sugar 
Plum Tree, 4785 Sullivan 
Blvd., Va. Beach, 23455. 
Artists and Craftsmen 
may contact Sugar Plum 
Tree., 425 Gotham Road, 
Va. Beach, 23452. 



Beach 
Ballet 

ine Old Dominion 
University/Virginia Beach 
Ballet recently performed 
"Cinderella" in the Cen- 
ter Theatre, Norfolk. 



801 



Sixty -Six 
S. Lynnhaven RO- 



WeNoy^ 



Hav^ 



340-5480 



:i: 



"^^^^ 



Bait, Gas & Ice 

(Fresh Bait & Tackle) 



Look for our 
Grand Opening Soon! 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
Transmission • Brakes • Tune up 
• General Repairs • 



r 




Cannon 

Cannon 
Honored 

Nancy Cannon, a 
Virginia Beach 4-H mem- 
ber, is one of 6 Virginia 4- 
H youth attending the 
recently held 53rd 
National 4-H Conference. 
The conference theme is 
"4-H Center in 
Washington, DC. 

Youth and adults from 
throughout the country 
were selected for their 
leadership skills. The pur- 
pose of the conference is 
to involve 4-H youth and 
aduli volunteers in 
program development and 
to develop and strengthen 
4-H public relation effor- 
ts. Participants are 
working delegates at the 
conference. They are par- 
ticipating in various con- 
sulting groups in order to 
contribute ideas to im- 
proving various aspects of 
the 4-H program. 

Cannon is part of a con- 
sulting group on Urban 4- 
H which is examining the 
needs and interests of ur- 
ban youth in 4-H. She will 
be sharing successes from 
the Virginia Beach 4-H 
program and exploring the 
challenge of involving ur- 
ban 4-H participants in a 
wide variety of 4-H oppor- 
tunities. 

Cannon is currently 18 
years old and a freshman 
at O.D.U. She is in her 8th 
year «f 4*H and is a 
graduate of Bayside High. 
Nancy has beenlactive in a 
variety of 4-H experien- 
ces. She is currently the 
President of the Virginia 
Beach 4-H Teen Leaders 
Club and is a State 4-H 
Ambassador. She has 
been recognized for 
various achievements in 4- 
H throughout the years, 
including being selected 
for the 4-^ Honor Club in 
1980, to be a 4-H All-Star 
in 1^82, and received the 
4-H "1 Dare You" Award 
in 1982. 



Cross-Lltes says: 

■-/ "To grow in the Lord: Feed 
on the word, rest in the 
Lord, exercise yourself info 
Godliness" 



OUNCE OOOLD [H 



t 



U 



.' 



COME SEE WHAT'S 
UNDER OUR RAINBOW 

Tidewater' Leading Gold Merchants 
are Pleased to Announce the addition of 

DIAMOND'S 

to our 14k Line 

Make us your last stop 
for Diamond Merchandise 

WE WILL MOT BE 
UNDERSOLD 

OUNCE O^GOLD 

. GOLD SOU BY ^TKHT • CVSnU ^"Ofj^^^lJl^^^^ 

• coMpam KPm sermce • is locau) omsD 

UPPB? L^a 



COL. JOSEPH (JOE) EXUM - AUCTIONEER 



JOE EXUM AUCTION CO. 

550 FIRST COLONIAL RD. 
VA BEACH, V A 23451 




Phone 422-6684 
422-4949 



AUCTIONS - APPRAISALS 
SALES -PROMOTIONS 




Shredded Red Hardwood 

Pine Bark Potting Mulch 

By the Truckload 

Protect Your Shrub 
Get It NOW While On 

SALE 

We Deliver In One Day 
Call Day or Night 

853-0250 855-7467 




6 Virginia Beach Sun, April 20, 1983 



,*r\ r*ff*#». 



■ -* 



500 Crafts At Aragona 




By Jackie Mathews 

Special to the Sun 

A craft show was recen- 
tly held at the Aragona 
Church of Christ 
displaying over 500 dif- 
ferent crafts made from 
discards or readily ac- 
cessible articles found in 
the home. 

Mrs. Virginia Zeiders 
exhibits her crafts an- 
nually for anyone in- 
terested. The items are 
geared to younger children 
and can be made easily. 
Mrs. Zeiders has been a 
resident of Virginia Beach 



for seven years and is a 
member of the Aragona 
Church of Christ on Wit- 
chduck Road. She works 
as a TMR Aide at the 
Louise Luxford Elemen- 
tary School. 

Mrs. Zeiders calls her 
craft inventions "Trash 
Can Treasures," and has 
written a book with this as 
the title. The book in- 
cludes instructions and 
suggestions for all her 
crafts. 

"I have always worked 
with children and there 



was always a need for 
simple crafts," she said. 
"These crafts are an ac- 
cumulation of ideas of 
over fourteen years of ex- 
perimenting with items 
such as egg cartons, 
orange peelings, cans, 
seeds, baby food jars, 
plastic eggs, noodles, old 
records, floor tiles, 
Christmas cards, felt, and 
shells." 



She added that with 
these items and a lot of 
imagination, "I came up 
with some very attractive 



arttetes. I also have craft s 
using sand casting, plaster 
casting, macrame, needle 
point, crocheting, staining 
glass, string art, sand 
painting, shrink art, clay, 
sand candles and mirror 
magic. My crafts started 
from a need I had and en- 
ded up being very useful 
to many. I have many 
people come each year to 
acquire new ideas to share 
with their children and 
they often share ideas with 
me, which I am always 
ready to add to my collec- 
tion." 




end The Services 
"f Your Choosing 
In Tidewater 



Jylalibu P.E. Program Attracts 250 



Xhe ninth annual 
Plfysical Education 
Program of Malibu 
Elementary School was 
recently held in the Prin- 
cess Anne High School 
gyqinasium. The students 
displayed many of the 
skills and activities they 
kikn throughout the year. 

The directors of the 
prsgram were Claudia 
Waght, sixth grade P.E. 
teacher; Elena Matterson, 
scA^ntii grade P.E. 
tea'cher; and Terry 
Saliryer, P.E. specialist. 
Salvyer has been the P.E. 
specialist at Malibu for 
se>ten years and says she 



J 



try to make P.E. a fun as 
well as a learning ex- 
perience for the students. 

The P.E. program in 
the schools are often 
overlooked as an impor- 
tant source of learning, 
however if a child is 
physi&llly fit, knowing 
' about proper foods and 
exercise they will be a bet- 
ter studnet scholastically. 

The P.E. Show had 
over 250 students par- 
ticipating in the various 
events. The first grade did 
an exercise routine called, 
"Get Fit While You Sit." 
The second grade did a 
rythmic activity called. 



"Ballin' The Jack." The 
third grade did a 
parachute routine to the 
song, "I Am The Body 
Electric." The fourth 
grade did a Lummi stick 
routine to "Stick Jive." 
The fifth grade did a soc-s 
cer routine to the song, 
"Hooked on Classics." 
The sixth grade did a jump 
rope routine to the song, 
"We Got the Beat" and a 
tumbling routine to the 
song, * ' Fame. ' * The seven- 
th grade did an equipment 
routine to the song, "Me 
and My Arrow," a Square 
Dance routine and a gym- 
nastic exhibition using 



uneven bars, beam, 
parallel , bars, and floor 
exercise. 

The P.E. Show was 
sponsored by the Malibu 
PTA and at this time the 
new officers were announ- 
ced for the upcoming 
year: Donna Suggs, 
president; Jackie Kit- 
chens, 1st vice president - 
membership; Denise Bar- 
nhardt, 2nd vice president 
- programs; Pam Carpen- 
ter, J vice president - car- 
nival; Nancy Bishop, 
treasurer; Terri Griffith, 
recording secretary; 
Marge Peak, correspon- 
ding secretary. 



Hie Thinker ••• 
and Believer 



Real Estate 
Series Set 



^Leal estate profess- 
ionals in Virginia Beach 
may be busy this Spring 
cl&osing between their 
co^inuing education op- 
tions. One^, ssi^ice^^ 
available 10" fea1f6« linT 
citizens is the Virginia 
Beach Public School 
system's program of 
Marketing and 

Distributive Education 
which works in cooper- 
ation with the Tidewater 
Board of Realtors to bring 
leetures by experts in a 
variety of fields pertinent 
to their professional in- 
leiest. 



Architecture and Con- 
struction" is the subject of 
a series on consecutive 
Tuesday nights running 
through May 10, at Kem- 
psville High j^phool, 
^Oomtd5." 



For $15, a person can 
attend 2'/2 hour sessions 
with one of Tidewater's 
foremost authorities on 
solar building design, 
Laszlo Aranyi, AIA, 
President of The Design 
Collaborative and Chair- 
man of the Tidewater 
Solar Energy Association, 



Auction Sale 

Saturday April 23, 1983-10:00 AM 

Walters Ruritan Club - Walters, Virginia 
(Highway 258 - between Windsor and Franklin) 



'T^he sculptor was right Our abil- 
Itj' to think — our determination to 
think — this Is the key to human 
progress. 

But the same God" who endowed 
man with the awilty to think also 
gave him the sense of spiritual des- 
tiny. To be thinkers Is only a begin- 
ning In the quest for odr purpose, our 
mission, the meaning of oiu- exist- 
ence. 

The message of ChrlsUanltj- has 
sLlways been directed toward men 
and women and youth who ha\'e Qie 
God-gtven zest for thinking. Week af- 
ter week In our churches the thinker 
Is challenged to become a believer. 

The most exdtlng and promising 
of man's endowments is not his 
capacity' for thought . . . rather his 
yearning for faldi. And faith Is never 
content with human progress. Faith 
is determined to commit our intelli- 
gence to the achievement of Dl\inc 
Progress. 



\ 



D AR Notes 



tjy Mrs. E.M. Stein 
Sun Correspondent 

Did You Know: 

•Thai Virginia has the 
12th highest tax burden in 
the nation? 

•That Virginia ranks 
38lh out of the 50 states in 
literacy? 

•That the average voter 
turnout in Virginia has 
been the worst in the 
country, for the last 8 
Presidential elections? 

•That banking is the 
biggest industry in 
Virginia? 

•That when em- 
ployment is broken down 
mto percentages, Virginia 
has 50f» white collar 
wCN-kers, 35^» blue collar 
workers, 12^« service 
connected, and 3% far- 
mers? 

•That Virginia is one of 
the 4 remaining "Com- 
monwealths" - Kentucky, 
Pennsylvania, and 
Massachusetts being the 
others? 

•That Virginia has the 
next to the worst infant 
mortality in the country? 

These were but a few of 
the interesting facts that 
the Adam Thoroughgood 
Chapter DAR learned 
from Mr. David Sieg, 
asMstant professor of 
government at Tidewater 
Community College. It 
wis also interesting to 
le^m that Virginia beach 
is • out of step with the 
mijority of the rest of the 
Sq^te, in that Virginia 
Bfach generally votes 
Rrpublican (in state 
p^itics), while Virginia is 
mainly a Democratic 
Staiy. In fact, the state 
legislature and senate are 



heavily Democratic. 
However, the State of 
Virginia generally votes 
Republican in National 
elections. 



GARDEN PLOW 
IRON STEW POT 
BUILDING MATERIALS 
kOCKING CHAIRS 
FOUR-DRAWER FILE 

CABINET 
LAWN FURNITURE 
SEVERAL PIECES OF WICKER 
OLD BOTFLES AND JARS 
DRESSER AND MIRROR 
CLAW FOOT TABLE 
SET OF FOUR CHAIRS 
KITCHEN CABINET 
SEWING MACHINE 
TABLE - DESKS 
OLD WOOD ICE BOX 
POTS, PANS. DISHES 
BEDS-HAT RACKS 
OLD SCHOOL DESK , 

PLANTERS PEANUT JAR 
PICTURES - LAMPS 



GARDEN TILLER 
LAWN MOWERS 
CHAIN SAWS" rtc-'*' 
PLATFORM SCALES 
OLD HORSE DRAWN 

EQUIPMENT 
WAGON WHEELS 
TIME CLOCK 
BICYCLE 
MOTOR OIL 
TOOLS -SAWS 
HOES - FORKS - SHOVELS 
STORAGE RACKS 
HEDGE TRIMMERS 
TYPEWRITER 
OLD BASKETS - CROCKS 
SHOP WORK BENCH 
SCALES 
WASHSTAND 
SHOTGUN 
HANDMADE QUILT 



Many other items 
too numerous to mention 

Lunch Will Be Served 




Consignment Items will be 
received on Friday, April 22 



Auctionwr: Renny Auction Company 





TiHE 

DISABLED 

AMERICAN VETERANS 

NEED YOUR HELP! 



WE NEED: CLOTHING, 

Mens, Women's and Children's. 

Also, Books • Toys • Linens • Bedding 

• Housewares and China. 



MThc 
Open Door (804) 340-1441 
Chapel 

31T7 V«. Betch BNd., Va. Beach, V«M 23452 

»JNDAY TUESDAY 

3r,adayS^ooi 9:15AM HWeSUidy llhMAM 

WorthipS^^'tcc .trtiAM 

....M-JIAM WEDNESDAY f 

Pr^Smice fcJtPM M«.w«ekServte.L •"':«• PM 



Announcements 



Saa^ Concert - by "His 
Own" of Cornerstone 
Ministries, Sunday, April 
24, 7:30 pm, Indian River 
Baptist Church, 1600 
Laurel Ave., Chesapeake. 
For further information 
call 424-5700. 




CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

4925 Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard Campbell, Pastor 

495-1004 
Youth L.LF.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. 




SUNDAY 

*-J*A.M. 
lt:4S A.M. 

urn AM. 



Of 



Ml S. Nnriowi Rmul 
^N«rfoft,Vt.,23Sn 



461-5041 



WQ>NESDAY 

VM P.M. FMrih r»^ MMtm 

DiULY 

rVi.Brk.-Nwf. 



A. L. Kay, l^mor Danny R. T)\omas,Associate Pastor 



CALL 461-4938 



FAST 



And Dependable, 
Pick Up Service 



\ 



WE CAN USE PICTURES, TABLES, CHAIRS, 
LAMPS AND MUCH MORE. 



TAX DEDUCTIBLE 

Please Call 461-4938 
Today.. .Thank You. 



Cmdar Road ^Aiambl^ of yod 




tKCCOMNOAD 

GMATMHOOE 

CHESAKAKE. VMOmU 23320 

TOEPHONE ua-tUi m M7 221S 



TaMhv Y«wi| AMii. . fmpjm. 






.^•< '^^^fA-^c 



VL e., 



< 



MOVIOENCE ROAO - VHtOHIA BEACM. VIRONIA 

i^.i ..«„ V Jd.., Mi,^>, «J i.^... X^.i S«^i 



Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 



<$> 



. V 



\ 



Today... inanK lou. ^ i 




AN iMWrAIIOIV 70 TWCNMTiirS 

BAPTIST CHUm^M 

1600 LMif^ A VWHM 
Clmt9p»9k; ¥m., 23325 

PfmtrWr^Sw^n, Jr. Patter 
4^4-5700 



Kings Grant Baptist Church 

873 Little Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

nWDAY 

.MlaJM. WEDNESDAY 

m^ N^ nam. iM p.i 



.f;W«.a. 



.11411 



Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
340-09^ 



.i:«p.i 



wmmmm 



mm 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 20. 1983 7 



.<-' 



Entertainment & Dining 



Why not spend your Sunday at Fan- 
tastic Fenwicks. Enjoy our special 



Queen Cut Prime Rib for only 4.95. See ^^,'^' '^'' ^" "-"J"'" "' "'""' 

our coupon mm ad below. 'if" '" ^fT""'- ^'*'""'' ^* 

House open 7 days a week. See our ad 



Cooking at the Circle? Nightly!! Ray 
Brown at the piano. 



below. 



At Nobby 's English Pup. Buy one of 
most anything and get one free. Happy 
hour twice daily 3-8 p.m. and 12-2 a.m. 
and enjoy our large selection of impor- 
ted drqft beer. 



At the Crab Pot live entertainment 
Friday and Saturday night. Call ahead 
for our "Business Man Y* lunch. 



At Cedar Cove Inn an atmosphere 
you will truly love. A chef that will tan- 
talize your taste buds. 




' Seafood RetUuirant 
SpecialfadBg in Sof tshell & SteaoMl Craki 

Friday & Saturday Ni^t 
Specials 

ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET 

at 

$9.95 per person 



BUFFET 

StMnuUp Round AuJus • Steuncd Shrimp 

Clam Strips • Snow Crab Lcp 

Slirimp Creole • Fried Filet of Trout 

Vegetables and Dessert 



Business Men's Lunch 
Call Ahead 

R^ular Menu Available for 
Lunch and Dinner 

Live Entertainment 
Friday and Saturday Nights 

Banquet FadUties Available 
2314 Beauregard St. 

(CMmt at Andn Gardn A Ifml'i 

Can:«3-2672 




P TKe 



u 

Try Vfrjinias ritvest (j 

\K Coun^ Dining ^ 

atui Dancing 

(i Live EnUriaintnen* tj^ 

h •Tke \vftingfer »and X>^ 



f 



8i» aoun«ufW<«<«n i^wy 



>.^ 4U-M29 ,. 



"S:^: 



0. ^^ 



i. 



What's Cooking At 
The Circle? 



1" NEW YORK 
SIRLOIN STEAK 

»14" 

The best quality 
steak in Tidewater 



LIVE MAINE 
LOBSTER 

»10" 

I Vi lb. stuffed with 
jumbo crab meat 



Early Bird Specials- 



Saiday-Wrangler Gong Show, 1st prize ISO.QO 
MoMtay- Closed 

TMMlay-Ladies Nite • Happy Hour All Nite for Ladies 
Wcdaeidajr-Mens Nite • Happy Hour All Nite 
Tight Jeans Contest, 1st prize SSO.OO 
(for Cowgirls) 
Thanday-Wrangler Rib Special • Bring a Friend 

2 for 1 S6.95 
Friday-Steamed Shrimp Special 1S.9S 
Vi lb. in spicey beer broth 
Satwday- Wrangler Steak Special S4.9S 
Juicy N. Y. Strip cooked to order 



•One Large Crab Cake 
•Fried Scallops 
•Sauteed Chicken Livers 
•Fried or Broiled Trout 



»5" 
»6" 

»6" 



The Wrangler... Live entertainment 
by the Wrangler Band. Tuesday 
through Sunday. 

vagy vacv vwy vwT vogy v t>gv vw 

-wmmmm — 

ONE 

THIN 

DIME 

At NOBBY'S ENGLISH PUB 

Hilltip Sq. Shopping Center 
(Next to K-Mart) 

422-6684 




LUNCHEON 
BUFFET 



*3" Tuesday-Saturday 



Full Meals Scrved^8:30 am-2 pm 
Tuesday thru Saturday«Closcd Monday 




NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT 
Ray Brown At The Piano 





Buy ^ of most anything 
for Itegular Price and 
<Sli^ One f or 1(K 
12 pm-4 pm 



•t AFOOO RCtTAUIUNT 



3010 High Street 
Portsmouth 




397-8196 



Happy Hour twke daily 3-S pm. 12-2 am 

Large Sckrtlon of Imported Beer 
InclpBg Dark Draft 

Daily tsBcheon Spcdab 
Breakfast ^AnyUme" from 99C 



M l I I I I I H " '" " I I I I I I 



I I II I I 1 1 I I I I I I II I I I I i J ' 




Saraajtoecials at 

NOW'S TOO 

TOOI^owaRd. 

Vlr^pia Beach 

Two IOC Siyi Sat. & Sun. 



AttA^t^>J!e^^a^A! 



Tf 




ANTASTIC 





71 



IN CHESAPEAKE 

THERE IS ONE RESTAURANT 
THAT PROVIDES 

ATMOSPHERE 

YOU WILL TRULY LOVE 

• SERVICE 

THAT'S TRADITIONALLY "SOUTHERN' 



FAMILY DAY 
EVERY SUNDAY 

QUEEN CUT 

PRIME RIB 

OM.r4^95 

WITH SALAD & POTATO 

Enjoy Your Sunday 

AndReka, 

LtiUs Servt You, 

FOR THE DM: 

A HOT DIGGITY DOG 

OR HAMBURGER 

^FRENCH FRIES * A COKE 

OiVXr#5r5rV 

And Don't Forgtt 
Onr Catering And 
Banquet FacUitto. 



I Buy any Entree at Regular Price And | ! 
I Get The Second Of Equal Value L 
I Or Less Absolutely j i 

Eqnres May!. 1993 II 




• A CHEF 

CREATIVE & PROFESSIONAL 

• FOOD 

THAT TANTALIZES 



CEDAR COVE INN 

100 Fernwood Farm Road 
547-3022 



Please Call for Resvervations 
Banquet Room 
For Fifty 




•Save *2.00 With This Coupon' 



I 

I. 



4(21N.WItcM«ekRd. 
VirgintoBcacli 

490-05S1 



I 
I 



gPLUS FREE SALAD BAR 
With Any **AI1 You Can Eat" Sit Down Buffet 




Fillet of Tront Golden Fried '4.95 

Fried Chidien Crispy '4.95 

Fried FUiet of Flounder 

Hometown Favorite *5.95 

Fried Ctam Strips Tender •7.95 

Fried Deviled Crab In Natural SheU *8.95 
Fresh Fried Oysters In Season Select. *9.95 
Fried Shrimp Golden •9.95 



,■» L«vm. TMi b ill ThcM iM^cr dcHdow rita we cmM 
|wM aw titrar~rfT mmcc. Trj 'em oace tad jroa'U be 

BBQ Baky Back Ribs •10.95 

Crab Cakes Our Own Homemade 

Maiylaiid Style *10.95 

^rind Shrimp Peel 'em yourself. 

Hotorcold '11.95 

Deep Sea Scallops If you like fried 

Scallops, this is it *12.95 



(Ym Bay reorder 2 or 3 of My elber tmdttt Itean of ^ari or hw vahw ihaa yoar ori^aal order, Rcordcn 
wM kc Krvcd oiriy f or csrtoBKfi ^id^ the wi^aal ord«r • TlHUBk yo«. 



6149 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Norfolli 



i 461-6654 *^ 



2406 E. Uttte Creek Road, Norfolk • 5S3-3793 
OrENIDAYSAWEEK 
Opca Mm. • Ttan. 4M - liJt/SM. 12-1 Jt Fit. A m. IM 



3960 Turnpike Rd 

Portsmonth 

399-5S38 



Save •2.00 With This Coupons 



I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, April 20, 1983 



Business, Real Estate ft Finance 



C&S Transit Awarded 
Navy Contract 



9J 



As part of its continuing 
effort to overhaul potions 
of its locomotive train 
fleet, the U.S. Navy 
recently awarded a 
$500,000 contract for 
rehabilitatioi of two cars 
to C&S Transit Corpora- 
tion of Chesapeake, Va. 

The contract will add at 
least ten new positions to 
the payroll of C&S Trans- 
it, a major overhaul and 
rebuild shop, and fdlows 
^ past government con- 
'*> tracts to the plant from 
,.J;the U.S. Army, NASA, 
;^and the Naval Weapons 
' Station in Yorktown. 



n TTic two, thirty-year did 
- General Electric diesel 
ii locomotives are 80-ton 
n cars powered at 470 and 
i 500 horsepower. The cars 
will be completely over- 
} hauled inside and out, 
(2 with major technical re- 
B pairs being made to up- 
ii date the train to state of 



the art technologi- 
cal needs. This 
includes rewiring, sound- 
proofing, replacing of the 
diesel engines, overhaul- 
ing of motors, gears and 
compressors, and other 
wOTk. 

"We're particularly 
pleased that 100 percent 
of the work will be per- 
formed on site, with no 
subcontracting needs," 
said Russell J. Figuera, 
vice president and general 
manager of C&S Transit, 
"we believe this is testi- 
mony to our strength as 
one of the most capable, 
oae-stop rebuild shops in 
the East easily accessible 
by both water and rail, 
routes." 

James Stevens, C&S 
Transit Project Manager, 
estimates that wcffk on the 
two locanotives will be 
completed within 270 
days. The Navy award 



was announced March 24. 

In additicm to C&S 
three other rehabilitation 
companies bid on the 
project, including General 
Electric, Chattahooche 
(Georgia), and Republic 
(South Carolina). 

Debra Rubin, Vice 
President for C&S Transit 
Marketing, points out that 
her company boasts sub- 
stantial expertise in the 
rehabilitaticm field. "For 
example, James Stevens, 
or Project Manager, has 
well over thirty years 
experience in the rebuild- 
ing of locomotives, 
nuclear submarines and 
other vessels and cars," 
she says. Another indi- 
vidual to be deeply 
invdved in the Navy pro- 
ject, Bruno Puntel, the 
Manager of Quality Ccm- 
trd and Tecnical Services 
fw C&S, is a master 
machinist and toolmaker 
with over thirty-five years 
of expertise in his craft. 




New Look At Bowman Transportation, Inc. 

Bowman Transportation, which maintains major operations in the 
Chesapeake area, celebrates 50 years of service with new management, new 
equipment and new corporate identity. Above, J. Ray Huffman, 
President/CEO, stands alongside one of the company's 5,000 units of rolling 
slock that show the new Bowman logotype. The sleek red lines of the distin- 
ctive triangular logo are a relection of the transportation company's recent 
streamlining measures and symbolic of Bowman's three-tiered service 
philosophy: on time, intact, on budget. Huffman served as the company's 
president for two years before taking on the additional role of chairman/CEO 
last year following the death of company founder Ralph M. Bowman. Star- 
ting with only one truck operating in only four states, Bowman generated $127 
million in revenues last year and ranked as the nation's 35th largest trucking 
firm. The nationwide system of 90 Bowman terminals serves over 10,000 
communities in 28 states. Last year Bowman carried 1.4 million tons of cargo 
over a total of 64 million miles. The company's latest milestone was its en- 
trance into the West Coast shipping market, marking the realization of a goal 
of coast-to-coast service in its 50th year of operations. 



Jubilee 

Luncheon 

Scheduled 

The Chesapeake Jubi- 
lee Service Club Luncheon 
will be held at the Khe- 
dive Shrine Activity Build- 
ing, 645 Woodlake Drive, 
in the Ckeenbrier section 
of the Gty of Chesapeake, 
Friday, May 13, 1983, 
fi^om 1 1:30 a.m. untU 1:00 
p.m. 

The luncheon is open to 
service, civic, and frater- 
nal organizations. The 
'. general public may also 
1 attend. The oKt is $5.(X) 
per person. Tickets are 
J availbale at all 13 Chesa- 
s peake fire Stations, the 
Chesapeake Chamber of 
, Commerce, the Police 
Chiefs office, and the 
Sheriffs ofli(». 

Members of all of the 
organizations that have 
r helped Chesapeake grow 
• are uniting f« this special 
meeting tc^ether if possi- 
ble, and it is encouraged 
that the various organiza- 
tions wear approfHiate 
bulges or name Ugs to 
signify orgaiuzation affili- 
ations. 

The gtKsst speaker will 
be the (tonorabte Rkhard 
J. Davis, Lieutenant Gov- 
ernor of tlK State ct 
Virginia. 



Pines Of Warrick 

Custom Construction 
From the 80's 



Wooded Lots A vailable 

Eveninp 

Willie Colston 547-8200 
Rhodes Realty, Ltd, 

2»S. BattkflMmvd. Om. 
) (904)462-4771 





ByROCXRPyu: 

Real Estate 
Owners On 
Hit List 

The 1983 tax-legisla- 
ti(xi season is about to 
begin on Capital Hill, and 
the Real-estate owners 
investors across the 
country could find them- 
selves on this year's reve- 
nue raising list. You're 
already cm one congres- 
siCTial Budget Office Mt 
list, in fact, if you fit into 
any of the fdlowing cat- 
Tories: 

1. You're a homeowner 
who plans to resell your 
house and defer taxation 
on your profits by buying 
a new, more costly pro- 
perty. 

2. You own or invest ia' 
rental apartments or com- 
mercial prqjerty and use 
the favorable 15-year 
depreciation schedule 
created by the 1981 tax 
act. 

3. You hc^ to make use 
of residential energy-con- 
servation tax credits 
before they expire in 
1985. 

4. You're an owner or 
invests in a building 
eligible for rehabilitation 
and preservation via the 
20-25 percent tax credits 
created by Congress in 
1981. 

5. Your combined mort- 
gage interest,, auto, atit^i 
oth^f nori-bublness coa-n 
sumer bdrrowihgs pro- 
duced to the HcNJse and 
Budget office for possible 
consideration in this 
year's legislative rounds. 



The budget office's 
cations haven't received 
formal attention yet by the 
House Ways and Means 
Committee or the Senate 
Finance Committee be- 
cause both sets of law- 
makers and staffs have 
been preoccupied with the 
emergency Social Security 
bailout bill. Conferees fin- 
ished off that pMkage 
prior to leaving for the 
Easter recess, however, 
and the committee will 
begin work oo revenue 
issues early in April. 

Complicating this 

year's tax picture is the 
federal budget deficit, 
plus the banking indus- 
try's heavy lobbying cam- 
paign aimed at killing the 
10 percent interest-with- 
holding provisions of 
1982's tax act. 

Capitol Hll and Trea- 
sury experts say that if the 
bankers succeed in knock- 
ing out the controversial 
withhdding reforms (and 
they appear to have the 
votes to do so as early as 
April 15), the deficit pro- 
jections wUl increase by 
$18 billion to $22 billion 
over the next five years, 
. Hiatv in tiu-n will increase 
the pressure for a sizable 
revenue-raising bill on 
Capitol Hill this year - 
very possibly one that 
affiecjts real estate. 

"If we've got to plug an 
even bigger hde than 
we've got right not" - 
thanb to the bankers' 
campaign - "then all bets 
are off as far as who's 
going to get hit" by tax 
increases, said a key staff 
member of the Ways and 
Means committee. "Real 
Estate inevitably will offer 
tempting places to raise 
revenue," the staff mem- 
ber added, simply 
because it enjoys such 
Jacge tax subsidies under 
,|))e current federal tax 
code. 

If you are alarmed 
about any of these pro 
posals, better tell your 
congressman. 



X Id R ChcM^cakc Coiia- 
cilnn Eddie Spcert, 
Ckeaapeake Mayor Sid 
Omaa, and Ray Araette, 
Presidcat of Araette 
Properties, lac. breali 
groaad for Pia Oaki 
TowaiioBWt, tiic flnt of 
three pliaset in 
Stoaebrook Laadiag, a 
$31,000,00*. project 
located ia Western Braa- 
ck. Tiw BBito wUlkc kaUt 
ky Araette Propertica, 
lac. aad narkcled by 
Larasan Realty Better 
Homes and Gardeas. 




Davis & Phillips Acquire 
Broadcasting Accounts 



Davis & Phillips has 
acquired three broadcast- 
ing accounts, located in 
a trio of states, anncHinced 
President Jerry Davis 
today. 

WGH AM Radio of 
Hampton/Norfolk, VA, 
has assigned its account 
to the agency. A television 
and supporting print cam- 
paign mil begin within 
the month, announcing the 
new tomat focus of the 



station. 

WMKW TV-30, Mem- 
phis, and KLRT TV-16, 
Little Rock. Arkansas, 
also recently acquired by 
Davis & I%illii». Both 
television channels are 
new UHF firequency sta- 
tions. The agency will 
handk their qpenings, 
providing graphics, mar- 
keting, advertising and 
public relations cam- 
paigns. 

Davis & Phillips has 



handled other television 
sign-ons, including 
WRLH, Richmond, VA, 
and WJTM, Winston- 
Salem, NC. 

The accounts represent 
billings of approximately 
$1 millicm. 

Davis & Phillips is a full 
service agency fo-med in 
1977, providing advertis- 
ing, marketing and public 
relations for mwe than 20 
clients. 




Tommy Gibbs 

Parkway Isuzu, Inc. 
will open at the end of 
April, Tommy Gibbs, 
President of Parkway 
Pontiac-Volvo, Inc. an- 
nounced today. Tommy 
Gibbs and Asbtoo Lewie,: 
President oj^. Bill Lewis 
Chevrolet in Portsmouth, 
are principal stock- 
holders. Mr. Gibbs will 
serve as President. 



Parkway Isuzu To 
Open At The End 
Of April 



Parkway Isuzu sits on a 
twelve (12) acre site 
located at 1790 Greenbrier 
Parkway, in the Green- 
brier section of 
Chesapeake. The facility 
J was fundeid jsy industrisi 
, .^revenue bonds issued by 
the Chesapeake Industrial 
Development Authority 
with financing arranged 
by Citizens Trust Bank. 



Parkway Isuzu an- 
ticipates a first year sales 
volume of four to five 
million dollars. Isuzu, a 
Japanese import, has been 
making cars and trucks 
sin<;e 1916. and diesel 
engines since 1936. Park- 
way Isuzu will be the only 
single point Japanese im- 
port dealer located in the 
city of Chesapeake. 



Serving The Real £state Needs 
Of Chesapeake 

WAINWRIGHT REALTY 

Are you considering selling your home? If so, now is the ideal 
time. Call us for a free, no obligation market analysis. We will in- 
form you of the best methods of disposing of your property, 
various types of fmancing available and other information per- 
tinent to the sale of your property. 

3237 Western Branch Blvd. 

In The Heart Of Churchland 





484-7777 



Member* of Poitimouth, CTwapftf Multii^ Lilting Service 
Metro Mul^iie Lttti^ Service 
porttRMMith, Oie^iealK Board of Reihon 




'Wt'rtw^Unglkinliem^jftmmkmMliiCkmvt^U' 



We're Number 1 
In Great Bridge 

•RtsiitmtU 
•Comncffcial 
•Farms 
Spcrirtato 

Serving Clicstpcakc Siacc 1M4 



REM.TOIIS* 

MILDRED B. RICARDO 
PRESIDENT 







351 Johnstown Road, CbcMpcftke, Va 

•In the Heart of Gmit Bridge 



Office Space A vailable 
Town & Country Plaza 




For ycAir life. 



YMjrheaNh. 



Vour busiMSS. 



Iburfuiura. 




ONE PRIME OFFICE SPACE ON 
REAR OF BUILDING WITH 
AMPLE PARKING. OTHER 
FOUR OFFICES OCCUPIES BY 
DOCTORS. 



DIRECT ALL INQUIRES TO 




IndMciual or group, 

VVbrfiington Ncational can 
tneet your needs with a 
broad range of quality 
programs and complete 
financial services. \Ate c^et 
life and healtti insurance. 
«tate planning, em- 
ployee consultoticxi, 
pensions and annuities. 
Don't watt, Tomorrov/s 
security and peace cA 
mind start v^tti today's 
^nnlng. Call new for a 
tradition erf service you 
can cocnt on. In 
TkSvwoMr call 490-3566. 



VMSMIAK/^HVA. 23442 



420-1217 




1 aceo** • * w 



tmm 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 20, 1983 9 



■s 



■- 4-- 



Business, Real Es^e & Finance 



Making 
Chesapeake 
A Cleaner 
City 



We have the oppor- 
tunity to make 
Chesapeake a cleaner city. 

The Chesapeake En- 
vironmental Council 
needs your cooperation 
for the "Clean up Week", 
April 15th - 23rd. Many 
clubs are helping this year, 
but every citizen is needed. 




SolaRoU Reaches Tidewater 



Alan G. Forbes, D.D.S. 

Our 20th Anniversary 
Jubilee, Mar 12th - 15th 
will bring many people to 
Chesapeake for the first 
time; let's give them a 
good First impression by 
having a clean environ- 
ment on our 20th anniver- 
sary. 
AlanG. Forbes, D.D.S. 



SolaRoU, an inter- 
nationally acclaimed solar 
collector system, is now 
available in Tidewater 
from General Energy 
Systems, Inc. The Virginia 
Beach solar energy com- 
pany will provide both 
sales and installation of 
solar energy products and 
function as the authorized 
SolarRoll dealer in 
Tidewater. \^ 



SolaRoU was developed 
by Bio Energy Systems, 
Inc. of Spring Glen, NY. 
as a relatively low cost and 
uncomplicated solar 
system. The company is 



noted for its new 
technological develop- 
ments in solar energy and 
has over 10,000 solar in- 
stallations around the 
world. 

The extrusions that 
comprise the SolaRoU 
collectors are made of a 
synthetic rubber called 
ethylene propylene dicne 
monomer (EPDM). It is 
neither expensive, heavy, 
nor subJMt to corrosion 
and the coUectors require 
no special skills to assem- 
ble or maintain. The EP- 
DM has a pedicted 
lifespan of 30 to 50 years. 

The SolaRoU system is 
relatively simple evoi in 



cold climates, as the 
collector needs no special 
fluid and' plain water is 
used. Nor does it use a 
nighttime drain-down 
system, except in the cop- 
per headers. And since 
wat«, not a toxic an- 
tifreeze solution, is used. 
A heat exchange is needed 
only for domestic water 
heating systems. The EP- 
DM is not subject to 
corrmion, so no corrosion 
inhibitors are used. 

This simpUcity, plus the 
ease of installation and the 
low cost of the EPDM ex- 
tensions, keeps the price 
of SolaRoU system 
relatively low. 
m 



The Builders 
Block 

By Dong Htckman 

RmI EcUIc Editor 

The BuUders Block is a 
regular feature highlight- 
ing new construction in 
Virginia Beach and 
Chesapeake. 




Campus East Rises Near 
Wesleyan 




David T. Mollendor 



Steve Swantko 



Dcnise R. Conaway 



Michelle F. Allen 



Bill J. Phillips, Jr. 



Pavilion tower Announces Appointments 



Pavilion Tower, a Dun- 
fey Resort and Conference 
Center, has announced the 
foUowing appointments: 

David T. Mollendor has 
been appointed general 
manager. 

Prior to joining 
Pavilion Tower, Mollen- 
dor served as general 
manager for the Whitehall 
in Houston, Texas', "^Iso a 
Dunfcy hotel, for two and 
a half years. Other ex- 
perience includes assistant 
general manager of the 



Royal Orleans, New 
Orleans, and a variety of 
managerial positions with 
the Hyatt Regency In- 
dianapolis, Oak Brook 
Hyatt, Hyatt Lake Tahoe, 
Hyatt Regency Memphis, 
and Hyatt Regency San 
Francisco. 

A 1^73 magna" cum 
laude graduate of Denver 
University, Mollendor 
holds a bachelor's degree 
in hotel and restaurant 
management. He lives in 



Virginia Beach with his 
family. 

Steve Swantko has been 
appointed sales manager 
for national and regional 
associations, and Denise 
R. Conaway has been ap- 
pointed conference coor- 
dinator. 

Swantko is responsible 
for generating rticeting- 
and convention business 
from national and 
regional associations for 
the hotel. Prior to joining 



Pavilion Tower, he served 
as sales manager for the 
Cincinnati Marriott. 

Conaway is responsible 
for coordinating all con- 
ference and banquet fun- 
ctions for groups booked 
into the hotel. Here ex- 
perience includes director 
of sales for Hmvard iohn^ 
sorn's OceanfTbnl', 
Virginia Beach. She also 
worked for Convention 
Parameters, a convention 
meeting planning service. 




OLDE 



TOWNE 

hliAapn 



A Custom Townhouse Community in 

the Urban Tradition. We offer 

exceptional quality at 

affordable prices 





KayAfdalil 
460-2770 



HOBM 

460-lMO 



Modd 
490-2356 



DIIIECTIONS EX i«i" Ivmni - 

10 turn lKatmil>i». um r<9Hi o" 
SiMilMfO' MatfaM on wr 



REALTY DIMENSIONS INC. 

i^ IB in 



Michelle F. Allen has 
been appointed director of 
personnel and career 
development, and Bill J. 
Phillips Jr. has been ap- 
pointed director «f 
catering and conference 
services. 

Allen is responsible for 
recruitment and training 
of the 220 employees to be 
hired for the hotel, which 
will open June 1 . She has 
workeid in personnel for 
Dunfey Hotels for the last 
nine years in Philadelphia. 
New York and Houston. 

PhiUips is responsible 
for developing the local 
catering market and will 
act as liaison between 
meeting planners and the 
hotel. Prior to joining 
PaviUon Tower, he served 
as assistant manager at 
Princess Anne Country 
Club, Virginia Beach, 
other experience includes 
director of food and 
beverage at Holiday Inn 
Scope, Norfolk, and con- 
vention services manager 
for Omni Intcrnatinal 
Hotel, Miami. 



Campus East is located 
off Baker Rd. across from 
Virginia Wesleyan Col- 
lege in Virginia Beach. 
This part of Baker Rd. has 
open fields with woods, 
and a spacious country 
atmosphere prevails. You 
are however, only five 
minutes from the inter- 
state at Lake Wright and 
ten minutes puts you on 
Virginia Beach Blvd. at 
Newtown Rd. 

This townhome com- 
munity, with maintenance 
free vinyl exterior, wiU 
have 121 units with three 
basic floor plans avaU- 
able. All units have 2^A 
baths with skylights as 
standard features. You 
may choose either two or 
three bedrooms and the 
largest model has a formal 
dining room. The square 
footage ranges from an 
economical 1122 sq. ft. to 
a roomy 1498 sq. ft. 20 x 
100 is the standard size 
lot, but if you enjoy the 
pleasures of a larger yard, 
spacicHJs 35 x 192 lots are 
available. 






The standard features 
include: fireplace, washer 
/dryer, ceUing fan, sky 
lights, wall to wall carpet, 
stove, disposal, dishwash- 
er, french doors in rear 
(instead of sliding doors), 
R17 in walls and R26 in 
ceilings, cinder block fire- 
walls separating all units, 
solid wood cabinets in 
bathrooms and kitchen, 
aU stained woodwork, four 
by five storage room, 
thirty two feet of privacy 
fence, HOW warranty, 
and closing costs are paid 
by builder (less prepaids, 
credit check and V.A. 
funding fee). 

Qxicordia Enterprises 
Ltd., is the builder and 
marketing agent for Cam- 
pus East. Concordia has 
been successful in 
Amhurst, Great Neck 
Farm, Quail Way, and 
Belamy Manor East. Con- 
cordia also built the Scho- 
larship Home fw the 
Homearama with the pro- 
ceeds going to the Tide- 
water Builders Associa- 
tion. Also to their credit is 



their selection as builder 
of the 1982 Custom Home 
of the Year in the 
$160,000 to $200,000. 
Category presented by the 
Sales and Marketing 
Council of the Tidewater 
Builders Association. 
Currently, one hundred 
eighteen single family 
detached homes are being 
built by Concordia in 
Salem Woods. 

Carolyn Griffin, site 
agent for Campus East, 
has marketed Quail Way 
and Belamy Manor East 
for Concordia. "They're a 
great company to w 
with because of their pro- 
gressive attitude and the 
quality of workmanship 
that goes into their 
homes. At Campus East 
we're appealing to the 
oent-up demand that 
Tidewater and the nation 
have been experiencing 
for years. The first time 
home buyers can buy in 
Campus East and not feel 
intimidated by the price, 
"Griffin said. 

Prices are from $54,950 
to $62,950. 





LANDS END 




LANDS END 




AFFORDABLE CONDOS 
AT THE BEACH 

•Monthly Principle & Intcrwt 
VHDA - 5 yr. Buy Down (Limited 
Amount) 

$2650.00 DOWN PAYMENT 

ADD $50 For Taxes & Insurance 

MODELS: OPEN 12-6 42M198 

NIGHTS: Alice Pyle 344M441 

PYLE REALTY 4M'im 




Pyle Realty Promotm 
Vii^inia Beach 







5110GreenwichRd. 
Va. Bch., VA 23462 
499-3330 ... 

A DIVISION OF COLONIAL SEKVK3 CXttPOKATION 



OAtiantic Ptemiaiient Mortgage Conqiany 

A Whdly Owned Subsidiary of AUaotk PennuKat FedenI 
S«viB(s A Loan Association 

944 Independent Blvd. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455 

(804) 460-076/2810 



^oitmiad 




A MVBION OF OaUSHU^ SEBVICE CORPORATION 

Viqinia BeiKh Bcmlevard West 

Nwfolk, Virginia 23510 

Phone (104) 623-3753 



(^omnicdjyitle 
uflgencg 

A mvnnlQr GOLoi&L tfiVmoowoKATioN 

fa. Bch., VA 23455 

i 4i»>14]6 



We Teach The Teachers 

When considering a Real Estate 
School, ask yourself, "Where did 
their instructors get their education?" 
The answer, most likely - through 

Surety. 

Everyone judges Real Estate schools 
on standards we set years ago. 
Today, these standards still apply. 
We offer license preparation in just 
sixty days, morning as well as evening 
classes at a central location. But 
most importantly, 

WE OFFER RESULTS... 

85*?^ of our students pass the State 
Exam on their first try and our 
Broker Candidates enjoy a 97Vo passing 

average! 

Come - join the winners. 

Surety, the standard 
of excellence 

Surety 

R^ Estate School 

5737 Princess Anne Road 
Virginia Beach, Va., 23462 

499-2395 




You're Bright. 

Ambitious & Successful. 
So why are you bored? 




M(Mt jobs are like this: you start like a house on 

fint, kam all iftere is to know, then >ou end up 

(toi^ tiw same thing day after day after day. 

Whoi you work with CElsTTWlY 21» METRO, 

no oat sets limits on your growth; you earn as 

modi as you're worth at your own pace. 

CiU us about our scholarship pr(^ams and our 

cxtouive real estate training. 

For a brighter future, join CENTURY 21* 

METRO. You'U mvct be bored. You have our 

word on that. WC wUl DOUBLE 



OUR SIZE IN 1983 




Metro 

1341 S. Military Hwy. 
Chesapeake, Va 

4^2000 
COME GRO V WITH US! 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, April 20, 1983 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



A Financial Plan For Working Women 



If you're a working 
woman with a responsible 
job and a promising 
future, chances are you'll 
continue to do well 
professionally. But finan- 
cially, like most people, 
you could probably use 
some professional advice 
to make the money you 
earn work hard for you, 

"Naturally, women 
aren't any different from 
men on this," says Bar- 
bara Dunn, manager of 
women and minorities 
development at Aetna Life 
& Casualty. "Most people 
don't give the amount of 
thought they should to 
their financial future - 
beyond getting that raise 
insalary next year." 

Dunn advises women 
who are professionally 
established, or on their 
way there, to devise a 
balanced financial plan. A 
well thought out plan 
would contain a com- 
bination of short and long 
term investments, life in- 
surance and retirement 
plan. 

"Financial planning is 
^currently a hot topic," 
Dunn says. "There are a 
number of places to go for 
expert help, including 
your insurance agent . " 

Insurance agents 
provide a range of finan- 



cial advice, which doesn't 
stop with insurance. They 
can advise you on in- 
dividual retirement ac- 
counts (IRAs), money 
market funds, taxable and 
tax-exempt money funds 
and bond and security 
funds " essential tools in 
planning for a financially 
safe future. An agent is an 
especially good source of 
information on life in- 
surance annuities -- the 
starting point of any solid 
plan. 

An annuity is a plan 
that provides an income 
for life, or a time period 
specified in a contract. 
Annuities provide a secure 
way to save money for 
retirement and defer taxes 
on the interest earned until 
then - when most people 
are in a lower tax bracket. 

Companies offer two 
types of annuities -- fixed 
and variable annuities. 
According to Dunn, "A 
woman who will depend 
mainly on annuity 
payments when she retires 
would probably want, a 
fixed annuity - where she 
would be guaranteed a 
fixed monthly payment in 
her retirement years. 

"But variable annuities 
offer certain advantages 
for many retired people, 
since their return is tied to 



Local Appraisers To 
Meet With Internatonal 
President 



Members of the Society 
of Real Estate Appraisers 
Tidewater Chapter No. 
117 will meet with H. 
Grady Stebbins, Jr., 
SREA, president of the 
international Society of 
Real Estate Appraisers 
(SREA) cm April 20, 1983. 
Alfred W. Wells, SRA, 
chapter president, said 
the evening activities will 
take place at The Holiday 
Inn-Crossroads in Rich- 
mond. This meeting will 
be held jointly with 
SREAs Richmond Chapter 
No. 102. 

A real estate appraiser 
for more than 35 years, 
Stebbins specializes in the 
appraisal of all types of 



property for private busi- 
ness and government 
agencies. He is the author 
of numerous articles and 
guides on appraising, 
including A Guide to 
Appraising Residences 
and an introductory 
appraisal textbook com- 
missioned by the United 
Nations for use, in the 
Hashemite Kingdom of 
Jordan. 

He is a past president of 
the SREAs San Antcmio 
Chapter No. 75 and has 
served the SREA naticm- 
alJy as go^ernOT, vice 
president and as chairman 
of the Admissions and 
Education Committees. 
He is a member of the San 



PRINTING 

Special Business Package 

*59.95* 

1,000 Letterhead 

Stationary 8 Vz x 11 

^ 1,000 Business Envelopes 

Business no. 10 

Black ink on white 20 lb. Bond 
Price includes negatives, plate, 
typesetting and composition 

CALL BRAD AT 486-0300 




RML 



2439 Oconee Ave. 

Virginia Beach 

Virginia • 23454 



I I I I 



T 



HOMEOWNERS - REALTORS I 

SECOND : 

i MORTGAGE LOANS \ 



Single Family 
To>«nhouses • Condominiums " 

Home Improvements/Purchases 
Bill Consolidation 
Business Investment 
Amortized or Balloon Payments 
Loans Up to S250 000 and more 

Call TodBf 

(804)4612551 



I I I T I I I I I I I 



changing interest rates. If 
you expect higher interest 
rates in the future, you 
might consider a variable 
annuity which would 
benefit from rising interest 
rates." 

Dunn advises women to 
study annuities with the 
advice of an established 
professional such as an in- 
surance agent. Buyers 
should consider several 
factors in selecting the 
right plan: 

•Look to the safety of 
your principal and 
assurances that the con- 
tract will be fulfilled. 

•Select your annuity 
from a reliable company 
with a stable financial 
base and a strong invest- 
ment record. 

•Look for an annuity 
which offers minimum 
deductions and expense 
charges on money paid in 
and assets accumulated. 
Buyers should compare 
initial and continuing sales 
charges, administrative 
and investment charges. 

•Consider the guaran- 
tees offered with an an- 
nuity, its flexibility and 
how it can be surrendered 
or transferred. 

"A businesswoman 
who has a family has to 
worry about providing for 
them in the event that 




H.Grady Stebbins, Jr. 



Antonio Board of Real- 
tors. 

The SREA is the largest 
independent association 
of professional real estate 
appraisers and analysts in 
North American with 
more than 15,000 mem- 
bers. 



something happens to 
her," says Dunn. "Today, 
with working women 
providing over 40 percent 
of family income, it would 
be difficult ~ if not im- 
possible ~ for a husband 
to support his family at 
the same level without a 
second salary." 

"A number of con- 
sumers don't feel they 
need life insurance when 
they're young. Many rely 
on a minimal amount of 
term insurance available 
through their jobs," says 
Dunn. "In many cases, 
they don't change their in- 
surance package as their 
assets and financial needs 
grow. And quite often, if 
something happens to 
them, their families are 
left in a finitncial bind, 
because they didn't 
regularly check to see if 
they had enough financial 
protection." 

"The best way to begin 
looking for insurance and 
annuities is to find a good 
agent," says Dunn. "One 
who represents a finan- 
cially sound company 
which is licensed in your 
state. If you have any 
reservations about the 
company or agent, don't 
buy until you talk with 
your state department of 
insurance." 

Ripley 

Named 

Chairman 

Robert F. Ripley, presi- 
dent of Ripley Associates, 
has been named Chesa- 
peake area chairman of 
the Friends of Virginia 
Wesleyan Cdlege Annual 
Fund fbr 1983, according 
to a jfflnt announcement 
by College President lam- 
buth M. Clarke and 
Friends General Chair- 
man W. Kelly Scott, sen- . 
ior corpcM-atc executive 
officer for marketing at 
Virginia Naticmal Bank. 

Ripley succeeds Dr. G. 
Wwthy Pegram Jr., last 
year's Chesapeake chair- 
man. 

The goal for the Friends 
program during the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 
1983, is $290,000, includ- 
ing $90,000 fffl- new scho- 
larships. 




SI>CE 1886, WE'VE 
MET TIDEWATER'S 
FINANCIAL \EEDS. 

WE'RE STII I 
GROWE\G TO MEET 
YOIRS. 



See us for rewarding savings plans and 
^ specialized loans. 

HomeF^ral 

Savings and loan Association 

sfNoifafli OiganucdMM 

MamOmn TOOBnah ■!•■(. Nortokt*/ 627-6431 

iraoch OWcw Thomas (^nw / Bortireou*! ' 

N««(ion Nms ' Hunpttn ' SiMaili > MMp ' 

D««i#i f Gnu Bndit / &aitoii 




Courtesy of 

C. Randolph Hudgfin, in 

Wheat, Firat Sccnrilies, Inc. 



Investors Face 
Changes 




80 percent owned by in-; 
dividuals. Management 
f(%ls the higher level of the 
stock price may attract a 
larger institutional 
holding. Most utilities 
with prices above $20 a 
share are heavy favorites 
with conservative in- 
vestors and institutions. 

The two main reasons 
for this proposal are in- 
creased flexibility and im- 
provement of image. 



Virginia Electric and 
Power had very little 
respect from the invest- 
ment community in the 
late 1970's. More recently 
investment analysts are 
impressed with positive 
steps taken by new 
management at Vepco. 
This hopefully will be 
another step in the right 
direction for a com{mny 
that is striving to upgrade 
its credibility. 



Investors in Virginia 
Electric & Power Com- 
pany have recently 
received a proxy statement 
for a proposed new 
holding company, 
Dominion Resources. If 
this proposal wins ap- 
proval there will be very 
few changes of major 
significance to the 
shareholders. What are 
the ramifications for a 
owner of 300 shares of 
Vepco? The exchange will 
reduce the amount of 

shares owned by a Vepco 
investor by one-third. The 
300 shares of Vepco will 
eventually be 200 shares of 
Dominion Resources. The 
market value would be ad- 
justed to reflect the same 
amount of overall value. 
If we assume Vepco was 
trading at $15.00 a share 
at the time of exchange the 
new holding company 
would trade at ap- 
proximately $22.50 a 
share. Thus if the value of 
300 shares of Vepco at $ 1 5 
is S4,500 then the value of 
^X) share of Dominion 
Resources at $22.50 will 
be $4,500. The dividend 
would be increased from 
$lj.60 on Vepco stock to 
si.40 on the . new 
Dominion Resoures. This 



will result in the same an- 
nual dividend of $4^.00* 
for the investor. 

What are the advan- 
tages to the investor? By 
creating a holding com- 
pafty Mch of the com- 
pany's separate divisions 
could be operated as sub- 
sidiaries. (Only the sub- 
sidiaries in regulated 
business would be subject 
to the decision of the 
regulators.) Dominion 
Resources, the holding 
company, ^ould offer 
more flexibility in dealing 
with non regulated sub- 
sidiaries. Currently these 
areas incliide coal mining, 
the proposed coal slurry 
pipeline in Virginia, and 
natural gas exploration on 
11,000 acres of land in 
West Virginia. This is a 
very small percentage of 
Vepco's current 

operations. Presently 
Virginia Electric and 
Power uses 99 percent of 
its assets in its electric 
utility operations and 
generates 96 percent of its 
revenues from electric 
utility operations. 

Another potential ad- 
vantage to the investor is 
the new image the com- 
pany would assume as 
Dominion Resources. 
Currently the company is 



DON'T LOOK NOW, BUT 
YOUR MILLION-DOLLAR 

IRA NEST EGG HAS 
SHRUNK TO $316,000! 

Last year at this time Americans were told they 
could become millionaires by putting just 
$2,000 a year into an Individual Retirement 
Account. 

So a lot of them put their $2,000 into 
accounts at savings institutions that were 
promising to pay interest of 16% or 11% a year. 

If reates had continued at that level for 30 years, 
millionaires they'd be. 

But in the past 12 months interest rates have 
fallen to about 9% . At that rate, in 30 years 
$2,000 a year will grow to less than $316,000. 
From $1,000,000 to $316,000 in one short year. 
We think it's unwise to tie your financial future 
to something as unpredictable as interest rates. 
You're likely to do much better if you put 
your money into an investment that's proven its 
ability to give you superior results over long 
periods of time and under all kinds of conditions. 
That's why we recommend the American Funds 
Group, a family of mutual funds with objectives 
that meet a wide variety of financial goals. 

Anyone who made the mistake of listening 
to the siren song of high interest rates last year 
doesn't have to majce the same mistake twice. 

Call or visit us today and let us show you the 
facts and figures that will help you decide where 
your nest egg has the best opportunity to grow. 

lllOLasUiiRd. 

P.O.Box566-A 

Vi. Beach, VA 23451 

(904)428-0110 



109 E. Main St. 

Norfolk, VA 23510 

(804)625-4281 



Wheat 

nstSecurities 



rTerms 
And Lower 
MonthlyP 



Morteage Optioiis 



United Virginia Mortage GapOTation is irieased to offer two new seocmd niort- 
gage plans designed to fit tcxlay's budget. These innovative options combine 
longer terms with today's lower interest rates to offer sutetantiaUy lower monthly 
payments. 

Witii our new 30/15 Seamd Mortgage, nmthly payments are based on a 
payback peiod erf 30 years althou^ the achial toan terni is 15 years. This means 
low maitiily paymente with the renaining balance becaning due at the «id of 
the 15 year period. 

Another optkai is our 15 Year Second Mortgage, with monthly payments that 
are consideraUy lower thyan the traditi(Mial 7-10 year second nKM-^ge. 

Add ll«se long term advmtages to today's lower interest rat^, and you haw 
a second mcslpge both flexiWe and affordable. 

Be^ of aU, there are no teofcer's fees or piepayment penalty for paying off 
the loan at an earlier time. 

So affl «s today to &id ait more about ttese exdtii^ new options. Give us a 
second d your time, and well give ym a seoMKi nwrt^ge deigned to fit ywir 
budget. 

(^11 our office now at 









It^lOf 


Annual 


Amount 


179 Monthly 


Final 


180Mor«ily 


Pefc«it^)e 


fttwwmi 


Payment 


Riynwnts 


Rale* 


$10,000 


$123.89 


$9,252.39 


$31,428,70 


14.75 


*1 5,000 


$185.83 


$13,881.72 


$47,145.29 


14.75 


S2S.00O 


$309.72 


$23,134.12 


$78,574.00 


14.75 


S50XX» 


$619.45 


$46,261.98 


$157,143.53 


14.75 



These fi^urw are bsMd on tha 
aasumi^ion ttiat the fir^ payment 
will tw due wittiin thirty (30) days 
ofttieciaengdate 

Mortqage Uta inMnnoe avail- 
ai^mvirie mortgage NiMwioe 
and TrUe Insurance lequlrad on 



*RalM and terms M^a^ 
lochttige wnttiout nottce 



ksk 



09 



Unitad Virginia 

C<ypofcNion 

Division 



461-9426 

2 Koger ExMntive Center, Suite 100 
Norfob, VA 23S01 



I i 



t^mmf 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 20, 1983 1 1 



The Woman's View 




Notes 
To 
My 
Friends 

ByJIMKINCAID 



October 16, 1981. 

I don't like Mondays. I never have liked Mon- 
days. And even though I didn't like Mondays 
back before Monday Night Football, I like Mon- 
days even less now that there is Monday Night 
Football. 

I realize that it's risky to make an admission like 
that to an audience that probably wouldn't be up 
this time of night if it didn't like football, but 1 
hasten to add that it's not football 1 dislike, it's 
Monday Night Football in particular. 

Football belongs in its place. 

Friday nights for high schools . 

Saturday afternoons for college. 

And Sundays and holidays for the prq. 

That's the natural order of things. 

I realize, some very bright and highly-paid 
executives at ABC thought up the idea, and who 
am I to second guess them. 

Well sir, just remember that those are the same 
guys who think that Howard Coseli knows 
something about grammar. 

Isn't it just possible that they're also wrong 
about Monday Night Football? 

This series of excerpts from "Notes To My Frien- 
ds" is brought to you through the courtesy of The 
Donning Company, a local publishing firm, and 
Jim Kincaid. The book is available in most book 
stores. 




By CHUCK FAULKNER 



Evaporated Milk, Whipping - Scald it first for 
about ten minutes in the top of a double boiler, 
then chill thoroughly. It whips very easily when 
it's very, very cold. 

Eyeglasses, Cleaning and Polishing - A few drops 
of white vinegar will clean and polish them as 
good as anything. 

Eyeglass Cleaner, Making Your Own - A 
tablespoon of cold water and a tablespoon of 
ammonia mixed in a small medicine bottle is very 
handy for polishing your glasses. 
Fabric Softener Sheets Making Your Own - 
Simply sprinkle a dry face cloth with three to four 
tablespoons of any liquid fabric softener. Toss 
the face cloth in the dryer with your clothes. 
Fabric Softener Sheets, Recycling - Don't throw 
them away. They can be used three or four times 
in the dryer, then used as interfacing for cuffs, 
collars, dresses, and other items. It saves you 
money. 

Face Freshener - In hot weather, squeeze some 
fresh lemon juice, strain it, then freeze it in an ice- 
cube tray. Rub the frozen ice cube over the face 
and it feels wonderful. 

Note: Lemon juice cubes are also marvelous in icy 
cold water as a summer drink. 



Chuck Faulkner is brought to you through the 
courtesy of The Donning Company, a local 
publishing firm, and Chuck Faukner. The book is 
available in most book stores. 




Beauty 
Unlimited.. 

By PATRiaA DAVIS 



The oval face is considered to be the ideal 
shape. Corrective makeup techniques can be ap- 
plied to other facial types to create the illusion of 
the oval shape. You must use the contours of the 
face to give the optical illusion of the oval shape. 
You can use corrective makeup to enhance an oval 
facei to make an oblong face look shorter, to 
make a round face look thinner, and to make a 
square face look softer. 

You can use a simple rule when applying correc- 
tive or contour makeup: "lights in the valley- 
shadows on the hills". This means for example. 




(c) novnd 



that highlighting ADDS width and shadowing 
NARROWS and plays down prominent features. 
Remember in all corrective contouring the secret is 
to BLEND, no one should know you have con- 
toured! 




Our Exclusive 
Body Waves on Sale 
THIS WEEK ONLY 

•33 



CHARLES JOURDAN 

Haircutting Salon 

For Men & Women 



1734 Laskin Road, HiUtop 422-2400 



Which Do You Prefer? 



PRINTING 

Special Business Package 



$ 



59.95 



1,000 Letterhead 

stationary IV] X 11 

1,000 Business Envelopes 

Business no. 10 

Black ink on white 20 lb. Bond 
Price includes negatives, plate, 
typesetting and composition 

CALL BRAD AT 486-0300 




RML 



2439 Oconee Ave. 

Mrglnia Beach 

\ irginia • 23454 



A Country Corn Bread. . . 
For Breakfast 





Nutri-Metics 

"Skirt Care A CositMks" 

Made From 
VITAMINS 




PROTEINS 



Other Cosmetics 

Made From 

Alcohol 




Chemicals 
Formaldahyde 



' 'Complimentary * ' skin analysis & 

make-up session in your home or 

our Janaf Studio 



Let our experts help you look 
your best "Naturally*" 

Call 466-1668 Today 
For Yonr Appointment 



I-aHc Aihinis 

Cut.ACirl' . 



We have styling choices 

for everyone and for 

all ages! 

PrcctaloB PfnciHonB 
Hakcnto rtrma 

•5.70 '13.95 •» 



I7ME.LMC Crack M. S39 
SIMMS 




ms. 

MMe^SlMppiigCcMcr 23116 CMhfAvi. 

399 ua 

N#A>pnlifii 
ihAlYaw 



5H9V. 



The ingredients in this Breakfast Corn Bread are fresh from 
the farm. And it's made the old-fashioned, country way, from 
scratch with enriched corn meal. 

Unlike other scratch breads, Breakfast Corn Bread is not a 
chore to make. True to its name, it's a quick bread. Just 
follow a few simple quick bread hints for best results: Be sure 
to use the size of baking pan specified. Grease the pan before 
baking, and mix only until the dry ingredients are lightly 
moistened. 

Bmkfui Corn Bread 



I cup enriched corn meal . 
I cup all-purpose flour 
4 teaspoons baking 

powder 
'/4 teaspoon salt (optional) 
I cup (4 01.) shredded 
Cheddar cheese 



I cup milk 

I egg 

Vt cup butter or 

margarine, melted 
8 crisply cooked baco»=i:mK^ 
slices, crumbled 



Heat oven to 400 °f. Grease 8-inch square baking pan. In 
large bowl, combine corn meal, flour, baking powder and salt; 
mix well. Add remaining ingredients, mixing just until dry 
ingredients are moistened. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 25 to 
30 minutes or until golden brown. Makes S-inih square pan of 
corn bread (about 9 servings). 

Announcements — — 



Historic Garden Weeit in Virginia, April 23- May 
1, 1983. Some of the most beautiful and historic 
homes in Norfoll; and Virginia Beach are waiting 
to greet you during Historic Garden Week. The 
proceeds are used to continue the Club's program 
of restoring the grounds and gardens of Historic 
Shrines open to the public. 

The Garden Club of Norfollc, Virginia Beach 
Garden Club and Princess Anne Garden Club 
tours will be held on the following dates and more 
information may be obtained from the chairmen: 

Virginia Beach Garden Club Tour (Resort Area), Tuesday, 
April 26, 10:00 am-5 pm. Block ticket $6.00, Single admission 
$2.00. Chairman: Mrs. John B. Syer, Jr., 428-5458. 

Garden Club of Norfolk Tour, Wednesday, April 27, 10:00 
am-5:00 pm. Block ticket $6.00, Single admission $2.00, 
Chairman: Mrs. John E. Clarkson, 489-7013. 

Princess Anne Garden Club Tour, Thursday, April 28, 10:00 
am-S:00 pm, Block ticket $6.00, Single admission $2.00, 
Chairman: Mrs. Charles B. Hayes, 340-81 10. 

The Zcta Upsilon Chapter of Beta Sigma Soroily, 

held it's election of officers on Monday, March 
28, 1983, at the home of Debbie Ellington. The 
newly elected officers are as follows: President- 
Marie Judah; Vice President: Linda Whittaker; 
Recording. Secretary: Judy Powers; Correspon- 
ding Secretary: Marsha Parris; Treasurer: Kathy 
Harrell, City Council Representative: Debbie 
Ellington and Chaplin: Donna Bonelli. 



/ys 



1*1 



Centrunf 



nan A la Zau" 



OFFICIAL MULTIVITAMIN OF THE 1984 WINTER OLYMPICS 



special 
offer 

•7.39 

with this 
ad 



BONUS OFFER 

30 FREE 
WrrHKX) 




i^ 



Conli'iiiii 



hwAtolnt" 



I 



Expires May 31, 19S3 

INGRAM PHARMACY 

207 25th Street 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 23451 

(804) 428^363 



B.B. FULK 

OPTICAL COMPANY 

OPEN SATURDAYS 
9 AM Til 1PM 



• STORE FRONT PARKING 

• NEW PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED 

• GLASSES DUPLICATED 

• EMERGENCY REPAIRS 

• PERSONAL SERVICE 

5847-B Poplar H^l Dr. 

Norfollt, Virginia 23502 

(beside MiHtary Circle-acrws from L^^U) 

461-3515 Magnifieri 
KXC^tklan Ray-Ban hoot: Moi-Fri M:» 

B^vnlk &in^asses s«i»-i 




Learning How. 
To Play 



Friendliness, like cour- 
tesy, makes the give and 
take of life more en- 
joyable, and, like cour- 
tesy, friendliness is lear- 
ned by experience as well 
as by example. 

When a child beginS 
walking is a good time to 
give him a start in learning 
the art of being friendly, 
according to Growing 
Child, the monthly child 
development newsletter. 

At two years old, 
children are so busy ex- 
ploring, so curious about 
people and things, that 
they have not yet become 
self-conscious about 
themselves. This is the 
ideal time for them to 
meet other children in a 
play situation. 

Even though children 
don't usually play with 
other children until they 
are about three, two-year- 
olds are not too young to 
learn the fun of mutual 
exchange. Skills in "Get- 
ting along" with others 
will increase with each ex- 
change and self- 
confidence will grow with 
each new acquaintance 
make. 

Friendliness is basically 
a love of other people, and 
enjoyment of their com- 
pany, and a spontaneous 
desire to please them. 



Beginning at two years, 
it is a good idea to take a 
toddler to some place 
where other children play 
two or three times a week. 
Toddlers get acquainted 
with other children in their 
own way and at their own 
rate. Don't push them, 
but quietly encourage 
them to respond, iflUtny^^^ 
overtures made. i. 1 

Don't be overprotec- 
tive, either! Toddlers ; 
must learn some give and 
take, and that includes 
holding on to a toy when 
another child snatches it. 
A little roughness and 
noise are not fatal. Tod- 
dlers should have the 
chance to learn to stand 
up for their rights! 

These early play ex- 
periences help children 
learn to play side by side 
or in company with other 
children, and to share and 
exchange toys. At this 
age, communication is 
largely wordless. Most 
toddlers talk more to 
themselves than to others. 

This early play behavior 
is known as "Parallel 
play." Only after a long 
period of parallel play do 
young children begin to 
engage in cooperative 
play, which requires more 
language skill than most 
toddlers have at two years. 



Mo icrubbing 
No soaking 
No steaming 



HAVi YOUR CARPETS. 
AND FURNITURE 
CLEANED 
FLOWER-FRESH 
. BY PROFESSIONALS 




Duradean' takes the son out 



Endorsed by furnishings jj ^■"•■^' "" "'"" ^ ''"'' 

manufacturers, ^"-^ ' i'l><- '^'-"i' •""'"'- 

the Duraclean -' /Tfy ^x .md '.»•." ■pnni; 

Foam-Absorption ^( j | \ j} H.k k iw iiir It « all 

Process gets ^/»d*?^ doncin vnur hunic 

thedirtout '^§^^^' „.,„l,t<>^m..-.isiht. 

that the other '— -^ , 

methods leave in' 

Call us for a Free Quotation 

Flower Fresh Carpel and Furniture Cleaning 

Duraclean-Burton Specialists 
487-7941 Chesapeake 





/5/3 Colltu/tHs. 

also, (L 4o'^'> 



(•: f 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, April 20, 1983 






Farm, Lawn & Garden 



Where To Put Your Garden 



Those who have never 
had a home vegetable 
garden face the challenge 
,,pf„ selecting the proper 
j^i^p for that first garden. 
j ,"If the first site is 
s«^f ctcd properly, the gar- 
d^p can remain in the 
^ame place in future 
ycj|rs," said Virginia Tech 
^^nsion home horticul- 
ti^ist Diane Relf. "Then 
^tw gardener can t/cxk the 
^ deeper each year until 
^,i;eachcs the most effec- 
ti\(e depth of about 12 
ii^^es." 
' ^vdd placing the gar- 



den in low spots at the 
base of a hill or at the foot 
of a slope bordered by a 
solid fence. Such areas 
are slow to warm up in the 
spring and frost settles in 
these places because of a 
lack of air circulati<Hi. 

Avoid windy locations. 
A southern sl<^>e will be 
the warmest. 

Choose a spot near the 
house so it is convenient 
to work in the garden for 
shcRt periods of time. 
Locate it near a source of 
water, which is usually 
near the house. 



Vegetables grow best in 
a level area with loose, 
well-drained soil and at 
least six hours of sun. A 
site that has eight to 10 
hours of sun is ideal, said 
the faculty member in 
Tech's Cdlege of Agricul- 
ture and life Sciences. 

Those who have sandy 
sdls can improve them by 
adding large amounts of 
organic matter. Minor 
drainage is caused by 
underlying layers of rock 
or hard clay, correcting it 
could involve the labor 
and expense of laying 



drainage tiles, so be sure 
to not plao the garden for 
an area where water 
stands after a rain. 

Once the site is select- 
ed, the specialist recom- 
mended having the sdl 
tested. Information is 
available at Virginia 
Cooperative Extension 
offices throughout the state 
on how to take samples of 
the sdl and have them 
analyzed for acidity and 
plant nutrients. Once the 
gardener has this infor- 
mation, plans can be made 
for fertilizing. 



Planting Seed 



planning YourGarden 



• n 

"Ipfencil and paper are 
the best tods with which 
to start a garden. 

fPlan the garden before 
you dig up the soil so that 
yiMi can make the most 
e:fficicnt use of your 
stMux, said Virginia Tech 
Extension home horticul- 
tq^st Diane Relf. 

TMake a list of the 



vegetables to be grown, 
after considering the likes 
and dislikes of the family 
and whether or not some 
of the produce is to be 
consumed fresh and scnne 
preserved. Keep in mind 
the amount you want of 
each vegetable. 

G^oup the crops accord- 
ing to height, to prevent 



pGetting Soil 
Ready 



]n March, the first 
warm breezes and the soft 
aroma of the fresh earth 
tempt the home gardeners 
out to the garden. But 
they shouldn't go too 
early. 

While experienced gar- 
deners can tell when the 
sdl is ready to work, 
beginners need help to 
determine when to get 
started, said Diane Relf, 
Extension home horticul- 
turist. :\|^ 

The soil ni ^d i B p be 
well-thawed am' mx too 
wet so that it can be 
turned over by {Hownig, 
rototilling or hand'spad- 
ing, she sakl. 

To test if it is workable, 
squeeze together a hand- 
ful. If it crumbles readily, 
tAIkt than sticking to- 
gether, it is at the right 
consistency to begin gar- 
Ufeping. 

Do not work the soil 
when it is very wet since 
this can damage the struc- 
ture by compacting the 
soil. 



ti 



Wb«n the soil is ready, 
^4he garden needs to be 
forked," by turnmg it 
with a spade or plow or 
.^■cototiUer, imtil the coarse 
lumpy texture becomes a 
fme, granular one. This 
makes suitable for a seed 
bed. Do not overwork it to 



a powdery-fine conditioi, 
she cautioned, since this 
might cause the surface to 
crust. 

"Wo-k the soil so that it 
is prepared to a depth of 
at least eight inches," 
said the faculty member 
in Tech's College of Agri- 
culture and Life Sciences. 
The depth can be 
increased each year until 
an ideal of 10 to 12 inches 
is being wwked. 
4;IncorpcH-ate organic 
n^ttter into the soil as it is 
b<iu,ti^ned over. To d4 
tia^i^tcad about a two' 
inch tayer of whatever 
type of organic matter is 
available-manure, straw, 
ground corncobs, leaves- 
and work it into the sdl. 

Fresh manure, with a 
high nitrogen content, 
should nd be applied in 
the spring, the spedaUst 
said. Rabbit, chicken and 
sheep manure should be 
applied in the fall, (x 
composted before it is 
used on the garden. 

At the same time that 
the OTganic matter is be- 
ing added, the gardener 
also can add fertilizer, 
spreading it evenly over 
the garden area and wak- 
ing it in deeply. 

The last step is to fdlow 
the directicms that cone 
with the seeds. Use fresh 
quality seed, purchased 
from a local garden center 
or mail-order caralog. 



Events 



April 

22, 23 • Southeast District 4-H Soil's Judging Cmtest 
May 

5 • Home Repair Cass (electrical and plumbing) 
Indian River Community Center 7 to 9 p.m. Call 
424-4238 to register. 



New Jphn Deere 
Rear-Tine TiNer 




Big 84ip englne^^^-inch cut 
oouiiMi loteling tifws 

New John Oeen 820 rili«f is ideal tor serious 
girdcrwrs, truck ti^mers and nursery operators 
has a commercial type 8-hp engine and a 22 
mch wortfing width The counlerrolattr^ tines 
with (ogi short and tour long blades per spider 
do a good tot> ot lillmg m a single p»S» Tines 
can a>*o be set lor sividard lotation 

The heavy-di^y gear type transmission has * 
forward speeds plus leverse Handlebars with 
control panel can be swung left or right to keep 
/ou troin keadin)) on tieshly tilled soil 

tef.u«,iod«y tor a new B?0 TiHer 



It 



\h 



> 



Princws Anne Equipment Corp. 

«S3 S. Batdeficld Blvd. 

Chesapeake. VA 23322 

(M4) 421-2111 



shading. Keep the tall 
plants on the n(»th side so 
they won't shade low 
growing plants. Grcwp the 
shorter, quick maturing 
crc^s together, so that 
when they are harvested, 
other vegetables can be 
planted. 

Put perennial crops 
such as asparagus and 



rhubarb in a special area 
so that the sdl can be 
wcvked without disturbing 
them. Practice crop rda- 
tion if possible. Rotate 
crops so that each area of 
the garden has not only 
had a different crc^ then 
that of the previous year, 
but (me from a different 
family of plants. 



When to actually put 
the seed in the ground 
depends cm a lot of fac- 
torS"the last frost date, 
the amount of rain, and 
the kind of vegetable. 
There are some general 
rules that will help the 
beginning gardner, said 
Virginia Tech Extension 
home horticulturiest 
Diane Relf. 

As a general rule, cod- 
season vegetables should 
be planted four to six 
we^ks before the last 
spring frost. Cod-seastm 
vegetables, those that 
grow during cod weather, 
include broccdi, cabbage, 
cauliflower, collards, 
kale, lettuce, onions, 
peas, spinach and turnips. 

Less hardy cod-season 
crc^s are beets, carrots, 
chard, mustard, parsnips, 
and raidshes. Plant them 
a few weeks later. 



A TRACTOR FOR 




You'll find Kuboia's L Series 
perfect for your mid-size job. For all 
sorts of reasons. There are many 
different models to choose from. 
And w^ith a 19 to 29 PTO horsepower 
range, there's one just right for you. 

They come equipped with 
features you'd expect to find only on 
bigger, heavier machines. Our L 
Series tractors are designed for 
the farm, park and grounds 



maintenance, landscaping, light 
construction and nursery work. 

With Kubota's L Series 
tractors, you'll have no grounds 
for complaint. ^ 

^KUBOTH 

We're looking for work. 



420-4220 



Stevenson Ford Tractor, Inc. 

1792 South Military Highway 
Chesapeake, Virginia, 23320 



EVERGREEN 
GARDEN CENTER 

YOUR ONE STOP GARDEN 

SHOP AND NURSERY CENTER 

FOR ALL YOUR LAWN 

AND GARDEN NEEDS! 



A Gift Of Spring 

Burpee and Wetsel Seeds 

Vegetable Plants 

Onion Sets 

Seed Potatoes 

Flowers 



SPECIAL 

Buy 2 Cell Packs 
GET ONE FREE 



1900 KEMPSVILLE ROAD 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 

467-7022 



Warm-seas<m cr<^ are 
heat-tolerant. They 
should not be planted 
until after all danger of 
frost has passed. These 
include snap beans, 
squash, sweet com, tom- 
atoes, lima beans, egg- 
plant, peppers, okra, 
sweet potatoes, cucum- 
bers, cantaloupes, pump- 
ins and watermelons. 

How seeds are put in 
the ground depends on 
the seed. In general, 
vegetable seeds shmild be 
covered about four to five 
times their lateral dia- 
meter or width, said the 
faculty member in Tech's 
Cdlege of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences. 

"Some seeds are sev- 
eral times Icmger than 
they are wide," she said, 
"so be sure to cover them 
about four or five times 
their width, not their 
length." 



Vegetable seeds usually 
are sown by dropping the 
seeds into furrows in con- 
tinuous rows. To make 
straight rows, drive a 
stake into the ground at 
each end of the garden 
and pull a string taut 
between the stakes. Then, 
draw a hoe or rake huidle 
along the string to make a 
shallow one-half inch 
deep furrow for fine seed. 

Use the comer of the 

hoe blade to make a 
deeper furrow for larger 

seeds. 

"TTien empty the seeds 
into your hand and drq} 
them into the fUrrows 
from between your fin- 
gers," said Ms. Relf. 

If garden sdl is quite 
sandy, or is mellow with a 
high content of organic 
matter, the seeds may be 
planted deeper. The 



young seedlings can 
emerge quite easily from 
a sandy or o'ganic soil. 



If the garden soil is 
heavy with a high sih and 
clay content, the seeds 
should be covered only 
two (X three times their 
diameter. In such sdls it 
would help to apply a 
band of sand or vermicu- 
lite four inches wide and a 
quarter-inch thick along 
the row after the seeds are 
planted. This helps to 
retain soil moisture, 
reduce crusting and make 
it easier for the young 
seedlings to emerge quite 
easily from a sandy or 
organic sdl. 

When all seeds are plant- 
ed, cover them and firm 
the sdl lightly over them 
using the botton of a hoe 
blade. 




FINE SELECTION OF SHADE 
AND FLOWERING TREES 

ROSES reg. $7.25 NOW $5.95 



Complete Selection of Vegetable Plants 

annuals and perrenials 

Ready for Planting to 

give Summer Color. 






99C to $3.50 



Now Open On Sundays 
10 AM -6 PM 





S?1!1I:FNB[!4N(H 



PHONE 547-1880 

334 BATTLEFIELD BLVD. N. 
(1 Mi. south of Chesapeake General Hmpital) 

HOURS; MON.-SAT. 8-6 

SUN. IM 






DELUXE 21-INCH 
MOVVERS 

Three models — push- 
type; self-propelled; 
and electric-start self- 
propelled. Push-type 
has 3\4-hp engine, 
self-propeileds have 
4-hp engines and 
rear-wheel gear drive. 
Optional 2Vi-bushel 

rear bagger QUt qUfck Bttd 

o-np easy with a 

SI!"!**!*"' John Deere 

The 68 Rkter has an Trf-^-^^^/c-i^-^, 
endowed engine for I nmm6r/ CCm6r 

quiet ride: shift-on-the- , 





go5-speed 

transmission. ReccMI or 
electric start. ^O- or 
34-inch cutting v^dth. 
Optional rrar taj^r 
for 30-inch mower. 

10- to 16-hp 
H'actors 

Choroefrom 10, 12. 14, 
and 16 hp. Built-in 
headlights. 
S^riable-spewJ drive. 
Color-coded controls 
Wide range of imple- 
ments available. Te^ 
drive a 200 Seri^ soon. 



COME IN AND CHECK 
OUT OUR COMPLETE 
LINE OF JOHN DEERE 
PRODUCTS. 

•Finandng Available 

•Computerind Parts 
Deparunmt 

•Complete Service 
Fadlitia. 

CHESAPEAKE RENT 

ALL, INC. 
IMWGrtalM^Hvtf. 

(|MlofflMMtt.lM) 

547-9244 







LMmaDemB* 



mmm 



^gm 



mmm^^^ 



•^m 



\ irgiilia Beach Sun. April 20. 1983 13 



Farm, Lawn & Garden 



Plan Fall Garden When Preparing For Spring 



As long as you are 
planning the spring heme 
vegetable garden, you 
might as well plan the fall 
garden too. 

The fall garden pro- 
vides fresh vegetables up 
to and even past the first 
frost, said Virginia Tech 
Extension horticulturies 
Diane Relf, if the gar- 
deners make the plans for 
the location in the garden, 
order the seeds and be 
aware of the time for the 
plantings. 

"Timely planting is a 
key to a successful fall 
garden," said the specia- 
hst. Cool seascm crc^s, 
such as kale, turnips, 
mustard, broccoli, and 
cabbage, will grow well 
during the cool fall days 
and withstand light frosts. 

Once the vegetables fw 
the fall garden have been 
selected, the gardeners 
need to determine the 
time to plant them by 
checking on the average 
date of the Hrst killing 
frost, and the number of 
days to maturity for the 
variety. Subtracting the 
number of days to matur- 
ity rom the date of the 



killing frost will give the 
date to plant seeds. 

"Since crops mature 
slower in the cool temper- 
atures of fall, and frost 
could come early, it is 
wise to allow for two 
additional weeks when 
figuring the planting 
day," said the faculty 
member in Tech's College 
of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences. 

Charles O'Dell, Vir- 
ginia Tech Extension hor- 
ticulturist, said that only 
10 to 15 percent of Vir- 
ginia's home gardeners 
seem to be aware of the 
potential for fall crops in 
Virginia. 

"When using plant 
sets, early August is the 
prime time to set fall 
crops like broccdi, cauli- 
flower, cabbage, collards, 
spinach, and leaf lettuce 
in the mountains," said 
O'Dell. Mid-August is a 
good time to set these 
plants out in the Pied- 
mont, Eastern Shore and 
Tidewater areas." 

O'Dell offered special 
advice regarding broccoli 
and cauliflower varieties. 

"After three years of 



data collection, we have 
shaken out what we think 
are the best cauliflower 
and broccdi varieties for 
Virginia," O'Dell said. 

"Premium Crop and 
Green Comet are excel- 
lent hybrids for the fall 
broccoli crc^ and are 
much more productive 
than some of the older 
varieties," O'Dell said. 
"The Snow Crown hybrid 
is the flnest cauliflower in 
our trials in three straight 
years and we test every 
variety we can get." 

O'Dell also recom- 
mends the Self-blanch 
viriety for those who do 
not want sun discoloration 
of cauliflower heads, but 
warned that in the mcnin- 
tain areas of Virginia nice 
plants must be set out by 
Aug. 1. 

Discoloration of the 
head can also be prevent- 
ed in other varieties by 
taking outer leaves of the 

O'Dell also recom- 
mends the Self-blanch 
variety for those who do 
not want sun disoloration 
of cauliflower heads, but 
warned that in the moun- 



tain areas of Virginia nice 
plants must be set out b\ 
Aug. 1. 

Discoloration of the 
head can also be prevent- 
ed in other varieties b> 
taking outer leaves of the 
cauliflower and wrapping 
them around the head 
with a rubber band when 
the head reaches fist size 
and leaving them there 
until harvest. 

Ms. Relf said special 
care can be taken to 
assure success of fall gar- 
dens. Restore some fertil- 
ity to the soil before 
planting the fall crops by 
working in a light layer ol 
compost or aged manure 
or a small application of a 
complete chemical fertili- 
zer. 

Dry soil may present a 
problem with getting a 
uniform germination fr«n 
seeds during the midsum- 
mer period. Plant the fall 
vegetables when the soil 
is moist after a rain or 
water the area thoroughly 
the day before planting. 
Cover the seeds about 
twice as deeply as the 
seeds were covered in the 
spring. ^ ^^ 



Dupont Donates Fungicide For Research 



Elm Research Institute 
announced today that it 
has received from the 
DuPont Company a large 
donation of fungicide to 
be used in the fight 
against Dutch Elm tts- 
ease. In announcing the 
gilt, John P. Hansel, fou- 
nder and Executive Direc- 



tor ot ERl said "actual 
figures are not available 
at this time, but clearly it 
will be sufficient to threaten 
many thousands ot elms 
over the next few years. It 
is the largest donation we 
have received since our 
founding in 1967." 



When asked what 
prompted the DuPont 
Company to make such a 
donation. Hansel indica- 
ted it was their desire to 
support ERl's new Johnny 
Elmseed program and 
thereby help preserve the 
legacy of elms handed 
down from earlier gener- 



ations. Under the Johnny 
Elmseed program ERl 
gives away one young elm 
in return lor each existing 
elm it adds to its National 
Test Plot, now numbering 
over 5,000 trees. The pro- 
gram begins officially on 
Arbor Day this spring 
when volunteers from 4-H 
groups, scouts, senior citi- 



zens and local conserva- 
tion groups will be fann- 
ing out across the nation, 
taking an inventory of 
existing elms. For each 
one they identify, they 
will receive as a gift from 
ERl a young elm to plant 
in place of one which has 
been lost to DED. "We 

expect to distribute over 
10,000 seedlings this year 
and as many as 1 ^000,000 
over the next few years in 
this all-out-drive to save 
ihis endangered species". 
Hansel said. "Sales of the 
DuPont fungicide market- 



.'d undefThe ^Rl label 
Elm Fungicide' will be 
used to fund our Johnny 
Elmseed program and at 
the same time treat the 
elms in our rapidly grow- 
ing Test Plot. We want 
elm owners everywhere to 
know that they will now be 
able to protect their trees 
against DED for as little 
as SIO per year, a small 
price to pay for preserving 
America's most beautiful 
shade tree, especially 
when you consider that 
removal of a single tree 
can cost as much as S800 
to $1000." 



Back at the laboratory 
ERl reserchers are hard at 
work developing a still 
better control for DED 
and using genetic crosses 
to propagate a resistant 
American elm. In fact, the 
flrst few offspring from a 
resistant parent are 
undergoing tests at this 
time. "We hc^e to have 
resistant seedlings avail- 



able for limited distribuiidii 
b> IV85. but there willtiol 
be enough lor gene;al 
replanting until someiihie 
in the 90's. Mcanwhlfcr; 
we must do our best io 
save those elms we have 
left. They are still Ihe 
dominant tree in cities \h^ 
Minneapolis, Denver and 
Washington, DC. Johnihy 
Elmseed needs the help'of 
every concerned Amefi-' 
can to locate those trees 
so we can get ttwm on dur 
National Test Plot and see 
that they get the care tl|«y- 
deserve. Thanks to Hut, 
DuPont donation ih^ 
future of our remaining 
elms never looked bright- 
er." Hansel said. 

If you own an elm or 
just want to be sure the 
elms in your town have 
the best chance for survi- 
val, write or call Johnkiy 
Elmseed, Elm Resear^ 
Institute, Elm Streot, 
Harrisville, New Hamp- 
shire 03450 (603-827- 
3048). 



Meet The Most Advanced. . . 
Mower in The Business! 



Grip 'N Go. . . 
Eliminates Complex 
Controls 



-<r»\i . i i-^uiiHit*-^ •* / ■' 



View Window . . . 
Eliminates Filling 
Guesswork 



Mulching or Bagging 
Eliminates Clippings 
and Raking 



u 




Flip-Top Bag . . . 
Eliminates Clumsy 
Clipping Disposal 



Single Lever Control 
Eliminates Awkward 
Height Adjustment 



Treekmofe 
Hardware 

HAS ALL YOUR 

LAWN & GARDENING 

NEEDS 






^ 




CREEKMORE HARDWARE 

1303 BAINBRIDGE BLVD. CHESAPEAKE 

545-5332 

IF IT'S HARDWARE, WE HAVE IT . 



Only 

$399^5 

Limited Tim* 




I 




Now on Sale! 




• The Articulator • Electric Start • 11 hp Lawn Tractor 

• 11 hp Engine • 8 hp Rider • With Big 38 ' Mower 






• 14 hp Cast Iron • 17 hp Twin Cylinder 

• Full Garden Tractor • Shaft Driven Attachments 

•48" Mower e^ ^,_ 




only '1599 



only '2299 



only 

•4199 

with mow»r 



Meet the Bolens Eliminators at: 

White Farm Supply 

1632 DeBaun Avenue 
Chesapeake, Virginia 23320 

547-2188 





JACK PEOPLES 

BONDED 
AUCTIONEER 



Full Auction Service 
Since 1%3 



1340 Head of River Road 
Chesapeake, Virginia 23322 



/ 



Dependability to Eliminate the Hard Work From Yard Work 



PHONE: 804/421-2525 
804/421-2360 



mmmms&mmm^mmm 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



J4 VhiftflSfBe&ch Sun, April 20, 1983 



Vrrsinia Beach PubHc Notices 



Classified 



Lion District 24-D 
Governor, William J. 
Saunders and Lion 
District Library for the 
Blind Chairman, Russell 
Cawley. recently an- 
^ nouced that the Lions of 
' Virginia Foundation has 
voted to provide $20,188 
in support of the three 
Subregional Libraries for 
the Blind and Physically 
Handicapped located in 
Lions District 24-D. 

A total of $10,088 will 
be given to the Special 
Services Division of the 
Virginia Beach Public 
Library, the subregional 
serving Virginia Beach, 
Norfolk, Portsmouth, 
Chesapeake, Accomac, 
Isle of Wight, Northamp- 
ton and Southampton 
Counties. The sum of 
$5,100 will be provided 
for the Newport News 
Subregional Library 
which serves Newport 
News, Williamsburg, 
York and James City 
Cptinttes; and $3,000 will 
gd to the Hampton 
Subregional which also 
serves Poquoson. 

The three subregionals 
are part of a Library of 
Congress network of 
cooperating libraries 
providing books and 
magazines on records and 
cassette tapes, or in 
braille, to, eli^ble visually 
or physically handicapped 
persons. The funds 
provided by the Lions of 
Virginia Foundation will 
be used to purchase Large 
Print Books, magnifiers, 
recorders, reading aids 
and other special equip- 
n^nt for the use of handi- 
ciq)ped residents of the 
three areas. 



hMkHMring 



hMkHtiriiif 



NkRe 



LEGAL NOTICE 
Take Notice that on April 
22, 1983 at 10:00 a.m. at 
the premises of Tidewater 
Imports, Inc., 3152 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
23452 the undersigned will 
sell at public auction, for 
cash, reserving unto itself 
the right to bid, the 
following motor vehicles: 
1978 AMC Concord, 
Serial #A89067C8377661. 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA Hall Pontiac GMC 
Honda, Inc. 
F.C.Rice 
Comptroller 
197-2 IT 4/20 VB 



Public Notice 
On February 23, 1983, 
Brian J. Friedman filed 



w^ith the Federal Com- 
munications Commission 
an application for con- 
struction permit for a new 
commercial television 
station on Channel 43 to 
be licensed to Virginia 
Beach. The station will 
operate with 3008 kw of 
power at an antenna 
height of 846.5 feet. The 
transmitter will be about 1 
mile south of Driver, 
Virginia. The main studio 
will be within the city 
limits of Virginia Beach. 

The applicant is a sole 
proprietor. The ap- 
plication is available for 
public inspection during 
library hours at the 
Virginia Beach Public 
Library, Main Branch, 
Virginia Beach. 
195-8 3T 4/25 VB 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of Zoning Appeals will con- 
duct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, May 4, 1983, at 
7:30 p.m., in the Council Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
The staff brieflng will be at 6:45 p.m., in the City 
Manager's Conference Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: __ 

1. Vincent J. Mastracco, Jr. and Preston M. White, Jr., 
requests a variance of 10 feet to a 20 foot setback from 
the east property line instead of 30 feet as required of a 
setback adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean and of 2 feet to 6 
foot side yard setback (both sides) instead of 8 feet each 
as required and of 2 feet in building height to 37 feet in 
height instead of 35 feet in building height as allowed on 
Lot 4 and Northern half of Lot 5, Block 7, Plat of Cape 
Henry, 8404 Oceanfront. Lynnhaven Borough. 

2. M. J. Robbins requests a variance of 4 feet to a 6 foot 
side yard setback (west side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (2nd story addition) on Lots 6, 8 and 10, Block 
41, Shadowlawn Heights, 704 Goldsboro Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

3. Joseph N. Hawa requests a variance of 5 feet to a 15 
foot side yard setback (west side) instead of ,20 feet as 



'lit. 1^* 



,: I 



EUBUC nqticb: 

BUDGET HEARING 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH'S 
PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET 

FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 1983-JUNE30, 1984 

Pursuant to Section 5.07 of the City Charter, a Public Hearing will be held by 

the City Council at Pavilion Theater, on WScdnesday, April 27, 1983 at 7:00 

p.m., on the City Manager's proposed Operating Budget for the fiscal year 

July 1, 1983- June 30, 1984, as follows: 

OPERATING BUDGET ^ 



Legulative 


732.825 


Economic Development 


3,188,985 


. Executive 


1.425,232 


General Servicees 


10,202,100 


Uw 


849.023 


Boards and Cdmmissions 


2,225,621 


Finance 


5.660.698 


Non-Departmental 


333,197 


P«sonnel 


687,636 


Fire 


9.430.M5 


' Judicial 


7.507,432 


Data Processing 


3,395,254 


Heakh 


1.135,264 


Permits and Inspections 


1,476.676 


-? Social Services 


7.177.261 


Mental Health 


3.785,430 


PoUce 


18.190.033 


Public Utilities 


17.405.363 


; PuMfcWorlcs 


23.321.897 


Education 


124,968,425 


Parks and Recreation 


7.352.514 


Debt Service 


33,197,885 


' Lftwary 


2.967.058 


Reserve for Contingencies 


4,089,679 


Planning 


876,561 






t Agriculture 


452.300 


TOTAL 


$292,034,554 




Revenues 




General Property Taxes 




$ 85,295,942 


Other Local Taxes 




57,887.643 



I- Other Local Sources (rmes. Licenses. 

Sale of Properties, etc.) 
. ' From the Commonwealth 
; Ftom the Federal Government 
From Fund Balance 

i TOTAL 



44,187,444 

91,608,031 

6,120,200 

6,935.294 

$292,034,554 



- NOTICE OF TAX INCREASE 

The City of Virginia Beach proposes to increase real property tax levies. 
However, the City Manager's proposed Operating Budget does not include an 
increase in the current tax rate of $.80 per $100 of assessed value. 

1. Assessment Increase: Total assessed value of real property, excluding ad- 
ditional assessments due to new construction or improvements to property, ex- 
aeds last year's total assessed value of real property by 8.291 percent. 

2. Lowered Rate Necessary to Offset Increased Assessment: The tax rate 
which would levy the same amount of real estate tax as last year, when 
multiplied by the new total asessed value of real estate with the exclusions men- 
tioned above, would be $.74 pct $100 of assessed value. This rate will be 
known as the "lowered tax rate." 

3. Effective Rate Increase: The City of Virginia Beach proposes to adopt a 
tax rate of $.80 per $100 of assessed value. The difference between the lowered 
tax rate and the proposed rate would be $.06 per $100, or 8.1 1 percent. This 
difference will be known as the "effective tax rate increase." 

Individual propei|y taxes may however increase at a percentage greater than 
or less thant he above percentage. 

A public hearing on the increase will be held on Wednesday, April 27, 1983, 
at 7:00 p.m. in the theater at the Pavilion. 

All hearinp shaU be open to the public. City Council shall permit persons 
desiring to be heard an opportunity to present oral testimony within such 
reasonable time limits as shall be determined by City Council. 

All interested parties are invited to be present at the time and place 
afor^Qcntioned. Individuals desiring to provide oral comment should register 
witft the City Clerk's Office before the hearing begins. The City Clerk may be 
contacted at the office on the second floor of the City Hall Building or by 



■ 



calling 427-4303. 



197-3 IT 4/20 VB 



Thoma9W. Muehlcnbeck 

/ City Manager -♦•• 



HMrim I 



NfeHcHMrtag 



PiAllcHwriin II ^McHwIin 



requu^ed and of 4 feet in building height to 39 feet m 
height instead of 35 feet in building height as allowed on 
Lot A, Linkhorn Shores, Duke of Windsor Road. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

4. Calvin R. Flowers requests a variance of 5 ffeef to a 5 
foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as reqiiired 
(swimming pool) on Lot 2, Block 13, Section 1, Princess 
Anne Plaza, 3405 South Plaza Trail. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

5. Robert and Prudence E. Templeton requests a 
variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot side and rear yard setback 
(southwest corner) instead of 10 feet each as required 
(swimming pool) on Lot 17, Forest Park, 1856 Timber- 
wood Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

6. John R. Savino and Mary H. Savino requests a varian- 
ce of 10 feet to a 5 foot side yard setback (south side) 
and of 7 feet to an 8 foot rear yard setback (west side) 
instead of 15 feet each as required (swimming pool) on 
Lot 7, Section 3, Greenhill Farm, 2076 Thomas Bishop 
Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

7. Runnington Investment Corporation requests a 
variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot setback from both 
Mediterranean Avenue and Norfolk Avenue instead of 

10 feet each as required and of 10 feet to a "0" setback 
from the west property line instead of 10 feet as required 
and to allow parking in the setback from Pinewood 
Drive, Mediterranean Avenue and Norfolk Avenue, 
where prohibited and to waive the landscaping in the 
setbacks from the streets where required on Lots 17 
through 22, Block 8, Pinewood, Pinewood Drive and 
Mediterranean Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

8. Campus East Associates requests a variance of 20 feet 
to a "0" rear yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
on Lot 1, Block RR, Section 2, Campus East, 5557 
Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

9. Campus East Associates requests a variance of 20 feet 
tp a "0" rear yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
on Lot 2, Block RR, Section 2, Campus East, 5559 
Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

10. Campus East Associates requests a variance of 20 
feet to a "0" rear yard setback instead of 20 feet as 
required on Lot 3, Block RR, Section 2, Campus East, 
5561 Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

11. R. G. Moore Building Corporation requests a 
variance of 15 feet to a 5 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 20 feet as required (deck) on Lot 1, Block B, Section 
1, Campus East, 5681 Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

12. R. G. Moore Building Corporation requests a 
variance of 15 feet to a 5 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 20 feet as required (deck) on Lot 2, Block B, Section 
1, Campus East, 5683 Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

13. R. G. Moore Building Corporation requests a 
variance of 3 feet to a 17 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 20 feet as required (trellis over patio) on Lot 3, Block 
B, Section 1, Campus East, 5685 Campus Drive. 
Bayside Borough. 

14. _R., G, Moore Building Corporation requests a 
vaiiaikceof 15 feet to a 5 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 20 feet as required (deck) on Lot 4, Block B, Section 
1, Campus East, 5687 Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

15. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints by 
Daniel C. Dills requests a variance of 22.5 feet to a 7.5 
foot setback from Masters Avenue instead of 30 feet as 
required (satelite antenna) on Parcel B, Section 2, Kem- 
psville Meadows, 4784 Princess Anne Road. Kempsville 
Borough. 

16. Cedric M. Johnson requests a variance of 3 feet to a 
5 foot side yard setback (west side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (2nd and 3rd floor addition) on Lot 12, Block 8 
and 9, Ubermeer, 218 58th Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 
1-7. Steven F. Shames requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 
foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required 
(swimming pool) on Lot 10, Fairfield Meadows, 700 
Walton Drive. Kempsville Borough. 

18. John N. Lupton requests a variance of 6 feet to a 14 
foot rear yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
(patio cover) on Lot 16, &M:tion 1, H«Uygrier, 3467 
Waltham Circle. Princess Aqpe Borough. 

19. Robert L. and Patricia M. Yoder requests a variance 
of 10 feet to a 5 foot side yard adjacent to a street 
(Cypress Avenue - unimproved) instead of 15 feet as 
required on Lots 2 and 4, Block 45, Shadowlawn 
Heights, Cypress Avenue and High Point Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. Helen L. Foos requests a variance of 2 feet in fence 
height to 6 feet in fence height instead of a 4 foot fence 
as allowed in a required front yard setback on Lots 1, 2, 

11 and 12, Block 15, Croatan, 752 S. Atlantic Avenue. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

2. John W. Thornton requests a variance of 9 feet to a I 
foot side yard setback and of 5 feet to a 5 foot rear yard 
setback (northeast corner) instead of 10 feet each as 
required (storage shed) on Lot 7, Block A, Gr«it Neck 
Manor, 2212 Harbor Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

3. Sam Arrington requests a variance of 10 feet to a 10 
foot front yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
(residential addition on Lots 20. 21 and Western half of 
Lot 19.) North Virginia Beach, 208 76th Street. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

4. Runnington Investment Corporation by Pandell 
Builders, Inc. requests a variance of 5 f«t to a 65 foot 
building separation instead of 70 feet as required when 
principal structures are separated by a common ingr^, 
egress and of 5 feet to a IS foot side yard separation 
between buildings not separated by a common ingress, 
egress instead of 20 feet as required and of 12 feet to an 
8 foot setback from the south property line instead of 15 
feet to a 5 foot setback from Laskin Road instead of 20 
feet each as required and of 5 feet to a 5 foot setback 
from the east property line instead of 10 feet as required 
and to allow the parking spaces to be 9 feet by 18 feet in- 
stead of 9 feet by 20 feet as required (townhouse con- 
dominium project) on Lots A & D, Property of W. B. 
Gallup, Birdneck Acres, 1221 and 1233 Laskin Hoadi 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 

BOARD. ■ 

Garland L. Isdell 

Secretary 

195-13 4/27 VB . 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: 

The regular mating of the City Council of Virginia 
Beach will be heard in the Owndl Chambers (rf t^ Cit^ 
H^ Building, Municipal Center, Princess Ann^ 
%tion, Virginia Be«:h, Vinfinia on Monday* May 9^ 
1^, at 2.00 p.m. at whteh time the following ajvj 
{Aif^tions will be hnrd: 



ZONING DISTRICT 



1.A 



CHANGE OF 

CLASSIFICATION: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of Newtown 
Developers, A Virginia General Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to R- 
8 Residential District on certain property located 209 
feet North of Connie Lane beginning at a point 520 feet 
more or less East of Lawrence Drive, running a distance 
of 313 feet along the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 409.18 feet along the Eastern property Une, 
running a distance of 315 feet along the Northern 
property line and running a distance of 397.5 feet along 
the Western property line. Said parcel contains 1.6 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Pickett Road 
Associates, A Virginia General Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to R- 
8 Residential District on certain property located on the 
East side of Lawrence Drive beginning at the Eastern ex- 
tremity of Daniel Smith Road, running a distance of M 
feet along the East side of Lawrence Drive, running a 
distance of 509.56 feet along the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 310.12 feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a distance of 281.30 feet along 
the Northern property line, running a distance of 2SM.20 
feet along the Western property line and running a 
distance of 228.28 feet in a Westerly direction. Said par- 
cel contains 2 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of Joseph J. Basgier 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to A- 
2 Apartment District on certain property located on the 
West side of Pleasure House Road beginning at a point 
400 feet JMorth of Lake Bradford Lane, running a 
distance of 100 feet along the West side of Pleasure 
House Road, running a distance of 305 feet along the 
Northern property line, running a distance of 120 feet 
more or less along the Western property line and run- 
ning a distance of 350 feet along the Southern property 
line. Said parcel is located at 2333 Pleasure House Road 
and contains 30,492 square feet. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon Application of John C. Aspin- 
wall for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for mini- 
warehouses on certain property located 260 feet South 
of Shore Drive beginning at a point 850 feet more or less 
West of Independence Boulevard, running a distance of 
120 feet along the Northern property line, running a 
distance of 225 feet along the Western property line, 
running a distance of 120 feet along the Southern 
property line and running a distance of 225 feet along 
the Eastern property line. Said ;par«el contains 27,0(^ 
square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. TU: CT I 

5. An Ordinance upon Application oftSrffcilJ'fSfeewill 
Baptist Chur(;h for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a group home (weekend use for military personnel) 
on certain property located on the South side of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard beginning at a point 520 feet more or 
less West of Toy Avenue, running a distance of 60 feet 
along the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, run- 
ning a distance of 413.10 feet in a Southwestcriy direc- 
tion, running a distance of 196.80 feet in a North- 
westerly direction, running a distance of 2 1 3 . 1 3 feet in a 
Northerly direction, running a distance of 217.28 feet in 
a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 1310.63 
feet along the Western property line, running a distance 
of 864.82 feet along the Southern property line, running 
a distance of 1226.38 feet along the Eastern property 
line, running a distance of 160 feet in a Northwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 225.41 feet in a South- 
westerly direction, running a distance of 146 feet in a 
Northwesterly direction, running a distance of ^)0.41 
feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance of % 
feet in a Northwesterly direction and running a distance 
of 212.69 feet in a Northerly direction. Said parcel con- 
tains 25 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCES: 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

6. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Floyd Swartz, William H. Barba and 
James L. Milligan. Property located on the Southeast 
side of Lakeview Drive, 1050 feet more or less South- 
west of Bromfield Avenue. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

7. Appeal from Decisions of Admiiustrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordiium- 
ce, Subdivision for Wilder Enterprises. Property located 
on the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, East of 
Groveland Road at 3177 Virginia Beach Boulevard. 
Plats with more detailed information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

8. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Offiwrs in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
M, Subdivision for Iva I. Bowman. Property located at 
the Eastern extremity of Glen Artten Road. Plats with 
more detailed information are available in the Depart- 
ment of Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed information are available in the 

Department of Planning. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith 

City Clerk 

195-1 12T 4/27 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
FOR 
RECONSIDERATION 
CHANGE OF ZONING, Margaret R. Mills and Gar- 
phine E. Smith From R-6 Residential District to A-1 
Apartment District Bayside Borough 
On April 1 1 , 1983, the Virginia Beach City Council took 
action upon the Ordinance granting a chaa^ of ummg, 
as stat«i above, in the application of Margaret R. Mills 
and Garphine E. Smith, which, by action of Virginia 
Beach City Council on April 18, 1983, will be RECON- 
SIDERED at the regular City Council me^vig in the 
City of Virginia Beach, Virginia, Monday, May 2, 1^3, 
at Two O'clock in the afternoon. 
Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
197 2T 4/27 VB 



D 



SEALED BIDS are being Uken 
for the sale of 1 Metal Uthe, I 
Bench Grinder, 1 Crane. All 
items may be inspected at 1745 
Acorn Street, Chesapeake, VA. 
8:30 - 5:00. Monday through 
Fridky. Bids may be submitted 
for single or multiple purchases. 
The Authority reserves the right 
to award bids on single or 
multiple purchases. Bids will be 
opened on May 2. 1983, at 2:00 
p.m.. at the Authority's Central 
Of fice located at 1417 Baiilefield 
Blvd., Greenbrier 1, Suite 115, 
Chesapeake Redevelopment and 
Housing Authority 547-4567. 

^ I2T4-27 

JUNK CARS • Wrecked or run- 
ning cash-free towing. We also 
buy used radiators and batteries. 
7 days a week. Call 487-9222 or 
after 6 p.m. 857-6670. 



2> rWrSMMlS 



CREDIT PROBLEMS? Receive 
a mastercharge or Visa, guaren- 
teed. Nobody refused. For free 
borchure send self addressed 
stamped envelope to Credit 
Dau. Box 271084, Dallas, Texas 
75227 or call anytime 214-324- 
5944. 

2TFN 



•.iMtS 



WANTED TO RENT • Private 
dockside space for cabin cruiser. 
Virginia Beach area only. Call 
543-2088 or 425-7657. 

84T4-20 



IO-IM^WmM 



1 



EARN $4.17 HR. - We need 
assistance in evaluating and 
responding to daily work reports 
submitted by our agents 
throughout the state. No ex- 
perience necessary; Paid to com- 
plete training. Work at home. 
For information send self- 
addressed, stamped envelope 9'/2 
hHshes long to AWGA, Dept. E, • 
Box 49204, AtlanU, GA 30359. 
10 IT 4-20 

nsnacr SALES EXECUTIVES 

Fot the Va., Tidewater area. Nat- 
ional firm expanding its sales 
operations. Seeking experienced 

sales person for new service to 
V. . /> ■ 

l>usiness owners. 

V Earn$2O,0dO-$3O,0OO 
Realistic 1st yr. comm. 
Future management oppor- 
tunities available. 
Call weekdays 9-5. 1-800-638- 

5850 

10 2T 4-27 

WRITE YOUR 
OWN PAYCHECK 

Are you tired of the same old 
routine? Are you worth more 
than you're paid? Well, it's time 
to step up. We are looking for 
dynamic and aggressive men and 
women with talent to deal with 
the public. If you feel you have 
these qualifications, call: 299- 
1457 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
for appointment. Ask for Amy. 
104T5-1I 

COUNSELLING/SALES - The 

non-commissioned and petty of- 
ficers association is in need of 
resident counsellors in the local 
ara. Contact Mr. Soloman. 499- , 
9878. 
lOTFN 

SALES-REWARD YOURSELF 

lap positions being Filled in 
Tidewater and surrounding 
areas. Weekly pay, commission, 
car allowance, monthly bonuses. 
Good working conditions. Work 
in your area. Be home every 
i^t. Have the support of a 50 
year old company. Opportunity - 
for advancement. Training 
period with pay. No previous 
sales experience necessary. Must 
have your own car and phone 
and be over 21. Cafl HUFF 
aX}K at 483-3390 

10-5/4 

EXCELLENT INCOME for 
part time home assembly work. 
For information call 504-641- 
8003 Ext. 7699 
10-4T-5/4 

ATTENTION LADIES ■ Under- 
cover Wear Home Lingerie Par- 
ties. Ftave a party or become an 
agent. Call Belina - 422-14(»; 
Penny - 423-1840 or Sandy - 245- 
8764. 

10 4T 4-27 

ARE YOU READY to work lot 
something you believe in? 
Virginia Action is training staff 
to wrt on c(Msumer issues. 
Houn Mon. Through Fri. 2-10 
p.m. CaU 625-7364. 

10 4T 4-20 

TELEPHONE SALES - Mor- 
irfi* houjs, salary and bonuses. 
No experience necessary. We 
train. Great for students and 
housewives. Call 627-1999. 



\ 



lOTFN 



MANAGiR TRAINEE ■ Ap- 
plications are no* beiiv mseep- : 
led for manager trainee position. 
We offer good mcmey and good 
future. For interview call 463- 
7624. 

I04TTFN 

PART TWE - &ks, neM stit^ 
diey lovBi with jfeijj ,0 e,^! 
e«ra income. No deliveries. 
»nMBing.Crt48643l7. 

10 4T 4-27 



^^ 



V irxiiiia Beach bun, April 2U, IVH3 IS 



Classified Ads 



io.iMpWMrtMl 



SALKS-AITtMlUN! LaM 

>ear »c were the large&i 
diiiribuior* for inierMaie* 
ciigiu«citng ill iIh- worU and 
we're Mill growing. \Vc need kc> 
people U) help us t.oi)iiiiuc our 
expansion program. Compleic 
training program and rupiU ad- 
vuncenieni. No experience 
ncccssar), bui inusi lia\e leader- 
ship poieniial. lor personal in- 
icrvicw call 463-7625. 

10 TIN 

SALKS - Lntry Icxel ptMiiiiin 
with New ^'ork Slock Lxehangc 
rirni. Call Mr. Salzberg ai 627- 
8549. 

I04T5-I1 



r 



SALES 

lA I ION AI. MANkl.ilM. I IHM 

llan OpvninK A>ailal>lc 

lurlwo Ambiliiiuii 

lM»lribulor» In A 

Million UoHar 
Knord lndusir> . 

lUbAL... 

Fur lund-Kalsin|t 

INrni i^Un, 

MaH Orders, 

And Phunc Sales 

TIME K MOM 

tALLtSTODA\ 

JACK CLARK 

2I4-234-3254 
Dallas, TX 



t 



Termile Damage Repaired 

Kloiir Juisi & Scab Replaeed 

Muisiure Conlrul 

Garland Smilb 

Conslruelion Cv. 

467-1160 



Renew Your Bteth 

Or Kitchen 

With ceramic tile set in con 
Crete or adhesive. 

25 years experience 

Leroy Miller Tile Co. 
482-3198 _J 



A-1 Paving 

Spring Spedal 
25<'/o Discount 

Drivewa)!i, Parking Lois, Seal 
Coaling, Sidewalks and Patch- 
work. Black Top Onl}. Krce 
Estimates 
. 460-4079 



HORSESHOEING 

Professional Farrier, 

CompeUUve Prices. 15 Years 

Elxpcricacc. CsH: 

EDSPEAKMAN, 

422-2325 




WMCMK Ml ma 

li<W«<ali.ll 



ai.itJm.M.ymm.Kl 



— v 



■Wa wW^^- ■w^^Bl^^ 



SALtit-STRLAM OF StCCt.VS 

Sicqi looking for those 8 lu 4 jute 
thai gel you nowhere. Our woni- 
pan> is orering a chance to work 
your own hours and make 
unlimited earnings. Coniaci Mr. 
Gibson. 8SS-8705. 

IU41 511 



11. Ptrititii WMrtM 



GENERAL HOUSE Cleaning 
reliable and exper^nced. Call 
.MO-138^. IITFN 

F.XPLRIKNCED Man and Lady 
willing to do cleaning; clean 
sacani aparinieni buildings, yard 
cleaning, wuik as companion, do 
day work. Call 622-0-92. 
11414-:? 

NURSES AID licensed for 
teriatria. Full time or part time. 
Own transportation. References 
avaUabte. Call 397-4771 

II -41-5/4 

SHUT-INS. WORKING 
mothers or treat someone special 
to a shampoo set, hair cut, per- 
manent wave, in your home. Call 
545-3277 

lMT-5/4 



12. 



INSTRUCTOR/COUNSELOR 

Conduct dynamic personal and 
professional development 
programs. Full or part time. In- 
dependent business opportunity, 
minimum investment. Call 463- 
2788. 

- I24T4-20 

hi AR OF 1 HE SLA SCHOOL 

I lea Market - Sal. May I4lh lU- 
7:30. Sun. May I5ih 9-2. kcm 
iiiduur table now. SI 3.50 boih 
days or Sl(..00 Sal. only. Call: 
428-4953 or 48I-I56R. 

12414-27 




WAilflP 

TO MIY 

scMr 

comR 



Joe M. Dtclccr 
GmiiMiiy, Inc. 

Ml- 1950 



PWtPBWU »J» 



MOtlU HOJME 

SKmrme 



II ■■ ■■ nf ail 



Tr. 



«295 



SWMT 



853-7689 

2tS0 CKMHWfU M>. 



Job Training 

Bank Teller 
Or Cashier 

HB«tAN«wTrMiclnOal) 

4 Weeks 

Caa Eani As Mucb As 

*5,00 Per Hour 

Call 625-5333 

24 Hours 

key Learn A Trade 

201 Graaby MaN Rm. 314 

4-20 




Commercial & Residential 

Design - Build 

Dean P. Edwards, Inc. 



Room Additions 

Garages 

Decks 

Chesapeake 

804-421-9273 



Remodeling 

Concrete Work 

New Home Consructions 

919-261-2901 



When Something Needs 
Building or Repaired, Von Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 

Home ImproYemeiii 
Spctiutisi.s 

•lliiildiiip ( t»ftlr;H.nir»RtMif>iK:»rp»MlsHiai^^ 

• llaih KcnnHlcleU«R<ww AAliliow 

•Ahiniinum Sidmg.'i^Kilchen Rcnwddin* 

54S-73IS 




12. 



\l 1 1. M ION: I lea Mdikci 
iXaU'is! buy ai wholesale and 
below wholesale. lnde|Kiideni 
Suits. Uil6 Meadowlakt Ui 
Norfolk, or call 857-4004. 
121IN 

BLLL AND GREY Flea Market 
- Inside and .outside spaces, 
(jraiid opening sinciaN on oui 
side lablo. 2<*H> Ne»ada Asc, 
Norfolk. Call 85395:1. 0|xn 
I liday.Sai. and Sun. 

12 4-27 



13.Nts 



KRIL DALMA1ION - 1o the 

right owner. 2 years old. Musi 
sacrilice because of niosc. 
Serious inquire* only, tall 583 
02%. 
I3TIN 

POODLL PUPPIES - Standaii. 
(Range from 60 to 100 pounds, 
jei back, non-shedding). Oreai 
disposition, 4 males, 4 fcniale;,. 
shots and wormed. S250.0U 
negotiable. Call 497-8490. 

13 n 4-20 

CAGES • Custom wrought iron. 
Let your creativity become 
reality. I will build thai 
imaginative home for your birds 
and other pets. Lowest price in 
town. 424-6499. 
13 41 .5-1 1 

BIRDS • Cockatoos: Citrons and 
Mullucans. $475.00. Many other 
types of birds available. Lowesi 
price in town. Guaranteed 
healthy. 424-6499. 
13 415-11 

COCKER SPANIEL PLPPII> 

AkC, 2 females, SI 50.. 3 males 
$125.00. 8 weeks, bjfl, Isi shois. 
Call 463-1 1 19. 

13 IT 4-20 



STEVENSON FORD 




TKAC10R 




420-4220 




SPRING SPECIALS 




)'.-Ubtliain>» 


VM 


t> 1- INwhirnio 


%m 


niiklHirgk 12" Pkm 


M*5 


PMltlMrik M" Plin, 


U2.1 


IMtXcnlltHiH 


S2«» 


3l><il«nilckAlrralur 


sm 


Ctt^lasiuB M" ttolHir) muwrf 


S4«5 


Itar^rrlMI.I Kuiar>(>iiH 


Mli 


Itartfc 1 l«ai.1 Rmw! I ullff 


SMM 


llw** 1 ITl Kul«r) { «»" 


SIIMtl 


OPEN SAT. 8-12 





a9» A^^INW^W 




5000 LB. FORK LIFT 
EXCELLENT COND. 

$2800 

PH. 569-9S31 



• AUMIllTARf 

NO MOHI T OOVl^N 

! NO CRIDIT CHICN 

unci SEIECTION 
NORFOLK mOTO.. 

916 1 HMU CHltK RO 
583-4356 

OMV 9333 



Antique Repair & 
Refinishing 

Caslam reproduciions 
avaUaMc. if yoa can Imagine 
il.ieanbaiMil. 

Call 424^99 




GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Homes d Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 
333 Providence Rd. 



CALL 464-9317 



i«.Ar1klMF«rSali 



2S.6««dTliiiig»T«EM 



WLDIMM. GOWN & \LII - 

Si/c '. 8. bva^ilully laced; while 
hmg sheer sleeves with train. 
Lc\s than one vear old. I 'aid 
$352. asking $100. 499-1465. 

16 n 4-211 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS • 

Across from Hurd ScLlood 
Kesiaurani. Shucked in own 
natural jucies. By quarts, pints, 
orbushels.( all .340-5171 



17. 



] 



2t.F lr i w >td 



LPIIOIinER\ • 111 viais e\ 
perience. Solas and chairs. I air 
prices. I rev pick up and delivery. 
I ree estimates. Call 4«5-300:. 
l~ n 4-20 

»INE WOOD REEIMSIIIN<. - 

ketiairs, louch-ups, reviuring an- 
tiques. 'Vsk lor U. J. Can be 
reached just alici 5 p.m. Call 
424-3330. 
r41 511 

ILRNI1LRE REIIMSIILII - 

Why buy new? I ree pick-up and 
delivers. I ree estimates. Price 
niosi reasonable. 424r4K99. Also 
quality upholsieiy work." Call 
46"-'i6K4. 

, r 41 4 27 



MRm(N)DL.M.IMIILD 

Cusioni-splii. 12". 16". IK". 
21", Also wIhiIc Uii; deliver). 
Call 543-3531. Iiigranis since 
|y"9. 
2841 511 



2v.uOTa VMWM 



II. Hiin^iiM 



WAN1EU DEAD OR ALI\L - 

Any major appliaiices. Call 547- 
4t).50. 

15 41 4-27 

WASHERS, Dryers, Ranges. 
KLfrigcraiors. Reasonable rates. 
Call 460-45 12. 

I51IN 



AiQ Pwyoae Real EMIc LoMH 

Vh^aia-NwtliC^ralM 
wmi GOOD CHEMT UP TO 

100% 0<r Value 

RcflMUKC MmI^^S 

lit, 2^, or %* 
!■ tanK caMa tolcrcai at low ■• 

12% 

■AOCaEMT 
wUk MrffldeMy cs«N» 

Guaranteed 
Approval 

Stop Fov^toMtfcs 



IRS 

Ata«VA4FIIA 

OpeiTHIPM 
SM-MTaZPU 



4**- 164 
After 



AM IQLL SI O^ L ■ Wood, coal 
siovc. Good condition. Call days 
ai 547-4571 after 6 call 4«5-46M. 
, »8TN 



22.NrHfMl* 



AIT LM ION MILnAR\ • L 4 

lo L 9: Denial Plan, Champus 
Aid. discounts on sicrcus, auios. 
Low rale auiu. lilc lll^urallcc 
ihioiigh NCOA Membership. 
I'eie Sehuhl LSN (RL1) 46.V 
6690. 

2 414-27 

CAREER EXPLORATION 
Seminar - Identify your skills, see 
new alternatives, plan your 
future. April 28-29. Call for in- 
formation. 463-2788. 
I4T4-20 

A BETTER DEAL FOR YOUR 
MQBILE. Running or not! Free 
towing. Call 499-4028 or 543- 
5164 

4-4T-5'/i3 



WAI.kLR AMI SONS 
1ULLSLR\I(L 

kcimivul. I, ppiiig, siiiiiip giiii- 
diiit, ciuiicsuvice. lulls iiisuivd. 
I ici esliniaUs, 4KhV06l 
uiiMinu. 

2'>414-2" 

Commerdal ■ Kekidenlial 
IjindMraping Srrvier» 
1(>R(> Sprinkler Systems In- 
stalled. North Landing NurMry 
tNe\t lo I armers Market), 
\ irginia Beach. 427-6886 

: ?9H N 

LANI»CAP|NG SERVICE - 

Lawn and Garden restoration, 
grading and seeding. Free 
estimates. 421-7350. 
28TFN 

Blll.LK AND SON Mll.CII 

ShieddeU wood and huik huid- 
wood. iiiickload. an) sl/c. 
I'rolcii viiui shrubs. Ciel now 
while III. sale 'we deliver in one 
d.i>.S'3();.<lioi 855 74(,:. 

2911 N 

I.ANDStAPING AND LAWNS 

I'rolessioiial jobs. None lo small 

01 large. I rex c^talnlales. Call 

6:2-3546. 

29 41 5-11 

MIRLBS - (Container grown. 1 
gullon uiiJ U-) llellcri. Jumpers. 
Aciiba. i'holiiiia. Ligustiuni. 
Litiii|K. Also trees. S4.(X) lo 
SI 1.00. below retail and heahhy. 
Call 48 1 -07 .36. 

29 II 4-20 



24.WMt«dToluy 



32. liitiiMtt F*r iMit 



MAGAZINES - Old Lile, S..iui- 
da) Lveniiig I'osi, Colliers, etc. 
I0C-25C each. I'risaic colkxun. 
Call 583-2642. 
24 II 4-20 

«.ASH PAID - Virginia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, i,ld furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire housefulls. Also,' good 
used furniiure. Call 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24TFN 

WE NEED COINS - Stamps 
Gold-Silver-pockei v^atehcs- 
usable jewelry. Anything related. 
Call now-top dollar. CASTLE 
COINS AND STAMPS. 1 107 S. 
Military Hiwy.. next to Toy 
Castle. 420-2646 
24-41- 5/3 

TABLE SAW - Prefer carbide 
blade. Win pay cash. < all 627 
5020 8 • 5 p.m. Ask for Lisa. 



S10RES AND STORAGE areas 
- All sizes. Properties unlimited. 
Marvin Goldfarb. 399-8390, 484- 

1275. 

32 TIN 



33. ApartMMls For Rwit 



3l.lMlEsMt 



*OUR PRINTED word' 
IS QUALIiy 



FOR YOUR 
BUSMESS 
FORMS AND 
LETTERHEADS 




h. 



CALL BRAD AT 
486-0300 




SPECIAL! 

*59.95 

1000 Leiierhcad 
1000 Envelopes 

NO CHARGE FOR 
■cgalivcf, plates ar 
iypcicllli^. 




RML 



CALL 
NOW 



2439 Omhwc Ave. • Va. Bnch 

RESO<ITS MAILING, LTD. 



31. RmI Estate 



AlCIION-3«lAtRLS 

Mav llih • Wednesday - II u.m, 
Jusi WLsi ol ihi City ol 
Irunkhii. \a. Lsiuic ol Hudson 
Douglas Williams. Citeui 
Uicalioii with tuniasiiv lioMlagc. 
Main I aim ■ 242 aiics, A highlv 
prkHJuclivc lainiini: iiiiil. Iionis 
iK'w LS Rl. 58 IJmviss. hmt: Hon 
lage (i"l and 68J>. W> avies in 
cultivaiioii. 26 ill t>iisiiiic. 21 m 
ponds. 129 acics woodland. 
sonK- sawtinibci. I'eaimi aHoi- 
nieni ■ 60.438 lbs. Ikuiitiliil 
Country Hume. reiiKHJeleU m 
1970 w.alum. sidiii)!. sioini win- 
dows and doors. 3 bedrtHMiis. 2 
baths, living and dinini: room, 
den and kiichencunihinuiioii. 

■'rupcrly Stmth ol Ri. 671 /.oned 
Ml. Indusiiial, will he ollers-d 
in 5 parcels, coinbiiiaiioiis mid as 
whole Irontage on Seabttard 
Coastline Railroad. Iciins; III'* 
Deposit Sale Day, balance at 
closing within 60 days. Subjc-ci it) 
Lueeuior's Confirmaiuni. I oi 
Infornialion contuci Ownby 
Auction and Realiv Co.. Inc. 
1417 Urouk Road. Richmond. 
\a. 23220. lelcphone 804.664. 
LAND. 

36 31 5-4 



mm HfMlf Hmfg 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach. Apartments for adults. I 
■ and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
'<f'i bedroom lownbouses. We pay 
heat and hot water. The Pines. 
Call 468-2000. 

??TFN 

APARTMEN1 IIEADgtAR- 
ILRS - Great Bridge. 4 
ll^alions, one and 2 bedroom 
ap'irtmcnis. From $260. Rental 
i.llicc, 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

.33TFN 



39. FrtftiilMnl Strvicti 



FOR SALE - IS acres, Grandy 
N.C. On ri. 158 with house 
trailer by owner. Good buy with 
possible terms. Call 420-9445 

36.4T-5'4 



3f . Prof twiMwl Swrvkts 



B(M>KKLLI>|NG SLKM' I - 

I'lelei small propruiurNliip. 
Disctiunl OH lirsl nionlli. liouei'- 
Hill aica. Call 488 -'Xis 

■S'/ai .« II 

SPRING SI'K I \i: 

All wells drilled Um S".Vt«i. \ll 
woik guuraiiieed. Call .vr VI '•'< 
.3V4I 5 1 1 

PLASTERING • Experienced, 
all kinds, small oi large jobs. 
Also hang wall-boards and do all 
kinds of cemeai work. Iiec 
estimates. Call 853-5714 

39-41-5/3 



40. Services 



HOUSE TRAILER: 1970 Sher 
wood - 12 by 60, good condition, 
2 bedroom new hot water heater 
and faueetis, underskirt. $3,500. 
Call 543-6467 or 543-5164 
38-4T-5/3 

CAPELLA"72-12bv65Miving 
room and dineing roiiiii expan- 
sion. 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, 
store. ref I igeraior. 
washer/dryer, central air. porch, 
cxra insulation in walls and 
ceiling. $8,400.00. Miisi be 
moved off lot. 497-4162. 
.38 II 4 20 

BRIGADIER - 12 b) 65' 2 
bedroom, fully furnished, like 
new. all energy saver appliances. 
Can stay oh walerlroni loi. 
17,000.00 negotiable. Ready lor 
immediate occupancy. Call 464- 
4466. Some financing available. 
.1 8 II 4-20 

HOLIDAY - 1975. cxcelleni 
condition. 3 l)edroom, 2 baili, 
and appliances, new vinyl skii- 
ling, plus many e\ras. Moving 
must sell. Home must be moved. 
$9,400 or best offer. Call 468- 
0770. 1 f no answer call 427-2 1 76. 
381fN 

CONLR ■ •4<2 14 b> 70. 2 
bedrimms, .' bathrooms, cciural 
ail, liieplace. fenced yaid. shed. 
Woodshtie Irailer I'ark. 
C liesa|K-ake. Call 487.29.36. 

38 41 4-27 



MORIGAGI. 

AAA llomciiwneis Loan: i5.(lia) 
to $150,000. crcdii no prohlctii. 
last approval, apphsaiioii by 
plume. 1-703-998-7458 any I line. 
40 71 5-25 

SPRING ItNE IP SPI.CIAL: 

I'usli mowers. ridei>. lillers, 
edgers. most reasonable. 
Guaranteed service. 588 9I0T. 
40 41 5-1 1 

SAVE' NOW ON SPRING 
TUNE-UP'S, MOTOR- 
CYCLES, AND MOPEDS. 
CASH OFF PARTS AND 
LABOR. HALF MILE WES1 
OF MILITARY HIWY. BIO 
SID'S. 461-8959 
4041-5/4 

ANDERSON REMODELING - 

All types of home repairs. Pain- 
ting, roofing, siding, carpentry, 
etc. Work guaranteed. Free 
estimates. Insured and bonded. 
Call 588-2558. 
401 IN 

LF.T tS CLEAN ^our Ollicc. 
Any .schedule thai is convciiiciii 
lot you. \ou can afford out 
prices. <i23-0741 for liee 
cviimaies. Ask for Louin'. 
____^ 4041 4 -27 

IKEASIRLS AND JINK - 

IX)iri ihiow ii awav. Ill c< me 

and get h. Call 545-tM59 oi 5<5 

1.1%. 

4041 4^27 

CARPE1 CLEANING and in 

sialhng. Coniaci Arnold, 48K- 
7138. 

4<*41 4-2" 



AZ.CMMCm 



CHILD CARL - Need two 
children any age. cxccllcni care 
and conditions, full lijjii^ Kcm- 
psvilUvCharlcstown area. Call 
alter 6 p.m. ai 467^1 rsr 

. 4247 5-11 

CHILD CARL • Inlanis through 
4 years. Available weekdays fui 
your childs care beginning June 
13. Loving honiiii-Deep Creek. 
Call 487-8156. 

42415-11 






L A L PLLMBISG, Healing, 
and Air Conditioning: Repair 
and nc-w work-sewer lines, water 
lie'..iers, fauceis repaired and 
drains unsloppcd. 24 hours. Call 
853-0056. 

39414-27 

AAW REPAIR: All phases of 
carpentry and painting. 
Professional rooring, guttering, 
vinyl siding, ceramic tile, room 
additions and garages. Licensed, 
iiuured, and bondol. All work 
guaranteed. Call 399-8941 

IMHD 

SHARPENING • Saws, knives, 
scissors, blades, almost 
anything. Reasonable rates. 
Work guaranteed. Call $47-7645. 
. 39TFN 

ALL TYPES OF Flower bed 
work. Reasonable rales. Pledges 
trinmied and cut. Will spread 
lopsoil. Call 465-3652. 

3* IT 4-20 



CONCRETE WORK - Walks, 
puiios, slabs, repairs, etc. Call 
486-6917. 
43 114-20 

(ONCRLIE \/ualit\ work 
done on drivewavs, sidewalks, 
patios and pool decks, etc. New 
Ol old ciinslriicnoii. Call Scott. 
4>»2-:672. 

43 41 4-2" 



48. ExtenalMtiag 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



20 words or less - $4.40. Additional wor«» - 22< ea«i. 
Please print clearly using one word per box. 









































4J0 


4.62 


4.84 


5.(» 


sa 


5.50 


5.72 


5.94 


6.16 


6.S8 


6.S0 



Please run ad for 

l^il to: 

Byeriy Publications 

P.O. BOX 1327 

Chesapeake, va. 2SS20 



Issues, or until cancelled ( ). 
Cost of slnflle ad $ — 



Number times to run 
Amount enclosed $ _ 



Name 

AcMre^ 

City „ 



state. 



ZIP- 



yourtet^Monenumbw . 

AU. OA^nW M» RUN « tW 0«S*««« «»T AHO THi WK»«A BfACM »«. 

por hrtii wWi your tfa^Htod ad, iilatia eai M7-W1. 



4S> liMnKtfMiffimtiM 



M. MeviRC a lteNlR( 



MDMN<, ■ (.leaning aii-l 
ll;iiilii,(: Kl all kii.Us ( .ill 5-1 ■ 

4'i4l4:^' 



I 



Sl.Pr'ntiiig 



t 



W AI I PAPKRIN<. AN I*; 

I'uiiiiiiil! - last aiKl iiieiidiv sii •■ 
VKc. Imal uleiciicc* InlilKhiil ■ • 
t. .ill iiv li>i a licv esliiiiatv. \i • 
tliiM ,iikI (. onipuiiv kvds'coii(iin|: ;, 

(.iMiiuuuiN 4;ll■.u"^. 

51 IInI 
PMNIING • laiKv I'l Miiall. 
iipIi. liiliiHii ami ixiciioi. I lec; 
v^liniatcs, \ci\ ic i\"ii;ililv 
piKc-. kclcuiui-^ available u|hiii 
ui|iiCNi. t oiiinicuial woik alvf' 
UiiiK. .iiul li|;lii k.ii|KHiiv aiii'"'^ 
".ill|>.i|'i.iiiii: cspviieiisc. I all' ' 
tV" <4I>3.'|484 M;<. : 

5I1IN. 



S2. Fiwtofrapliy 



I.I K.ll l>H010GRAPIII<-<- 

SeiMic beauliliil Weddin. ' 
Mciiioncs . • Phoiogruphv lot'. 
\i\\ Occasion. Call 48:1 3 1 2:. 
lodav. "Hie Wedding I'liolO;. 

tiiaplKi"'". 

<:iiN 



S5. 



UA1IIK«N>KI KLMODLI.iNG ■ ' 

(>kl and new. SiKxiuli/iii}! iir^' 
t.cuiiiiK lilt: walls and floiM 
t.i'Vtiiii): Kcusonal'lc rales, licet.* 
cstiiiiii(c'>. 21) yeuis experience m^" 
liJcualci aiea. Small and lai):cj 
joliv. Ciuuraiitec all woik. Call, 
54" 4"*4 aiivtiine. 

.v^iin" 



St.TuS«vlM, 



INCOME TAX - and Accounl-^-' 
ing (including tax audits). Mariol': 
Venditti, former Revenue Agent jV 
3707 Virginia Beach Blvd., (near^ 
Rosemoflt Rd.) Call 463-660B. .• 
39-TFn' 



Sl.MacMMryARtfTMit 



MACHINERY AND TOOLS^ 

Payloader-1978, 515 Interw;! 
national articulating payloader,^ 
2 yards. No hrs. fince nujor*^ 
overhaul. Looks and runs like 
new. $35,000. CHARLIE 
«.RBir ANT 461-4023 

6I-4T-J/4 
PAVldAl$Hl-l978, 515 Imer- 
national articulating payloader. 
2 yards. No hrs. since major 
overhaul. Looks and runs like 
new. $35,000. CHARLIE 
BRYANT 461 -4023 
_ . tHT-?/'* 

BLLLDOZER-TD 15 Series B. 
NO hours since major overhaul. 
Like new. $30,000. Charlie 
Bryant 461-4023, till 9 p.m. 

6l-4T-$/4 



C2.FIM lUiktt 



PRESION PES! CONIROL 

1 speciali/e in the control of an> 
household pest. S|>ecial price on 
warchouM* or aparimeni, 5 room 
home Ol mobile home... $15. 00 
Call: 543-1898. 
45 41 5-11 

MASTER PEST Control - 
Scientific rxicrmination, Sand 
and moisture control, windowtill 
and joice repair, house jacking. 
Free Termite inspection. $5 off 
on termite control, $50 off on 
roach control with this ad. 
F.H.A. i V.A. reports given. 
Catt 4*7.4024. 

45-661-3/9/84 



NORMAN'S FLEA MARkLI - 

\cgctable. Ilowei plants, and 
garden supplies. Lawn mowers 
rcpaltcd. C/uick service. 47 18 
I'orlsmoulh Blvd. ncai Juhfl. 
Chesapeake. 465-3.300. 
62 41 5 11 

DEBORAH'S FLEA MARKET: 

5939 Va. Beach, Blvd. 461-9778 
INSIDE SHOPS OPEN 7 
DAYS. GOLD/SILVER 
BOUGHT/SOLD. OUTSIDE 
SPACES, SAT. AND SUN. $5 
A DAY. 

62-4T-5/4 

BIG TOP FXEA MARKET - 
Have your sale here. Buying gold 
and diamonds, etc. 7600 Sewells 
Ft. Rd. 480-3122, Tues. thru 
Sun. 

M-4T-?/4 

FARIS ST. FLEA MARkLI 
3450 AZALEA GARDEN RD 
SHOES, SOCKS, AND HOSL 
fOR VOUR DC^LLS. WILL 
DRESS IN CHRISTENING 
CLOTHES WITH FRENCH; 
BONNETS. CALL 853-Sf77 

62-4T-5/3i 



PIANO TEACHER: ^our home 
or mine. Music Degree, 10 years 
aperiencc. Ail levels, all ages. 
Before 3 p.m. and after 7 p.m. 
CaUS8S-59}3 

48-4T-5/4 



U. 



WASHERS, DRYLR.S, Ranges. ; 

Relrigerators. Reasonable rates. ; 

Call460-45I2 ', 

63 41 5 11' 



Crwtors aadproAfctn of ^aatftTr foN' cost 

WFSETNEWSPAPOS 
AndCIKULARS 



BYBHYPUtLKATHm 



MF $27'4929Hr Q M §UUn 



16 Virginia Beach Sun, April 20, 1983 



The Pit Stop 




Isuzu - Built To Take It 





A car is only as dependable as the company 
that builds it. 



Perhaps The Fastest, 

iQnietest, Highest Mileage, 

Lowest Priced Line of Gas 

and Diesel Cars In The 
World Today. 

While some carbuilders 
ju"e content to equate per- 
formance with quick ac- 
celeration and 
maneuverability, at Isuzu 
ihey demand a bit more. 
: They require that an 
Isuzu not only rank as one 
Of the best handling cars 
in it class, but also rank as 
one of the most 
economical cars in the 
world. 

; They demand that an 
Isuzu not only hold the 
road, but also that it hold 
together. 

Because they know that 
the truest measurement of 
performance for a car may 
be found in its level of 
owner satisfaction. 

And it's gratifying to 
know, that according to a 



recent Popular Mechanics 
survey of Isuzu owners 
who've driven 2,403,678 
cumulative miles, an im- 
pressive 89% would per- 
chase an Isuzu product 
again. 

At Isuzu they know that 
a car is only as reliable as 
its engine. So for the past 
67 years they've been 
designing, re-designing 
and developing some of 
the most reliable and 
durable engines in the 
world. 

The Isuzu G180Z 
gasoline engine sets a high 
standard for reliability, 
1) erf arm a nee and 
economy in a 1.8 liter 
engine. 

A Diesel That's Meant 
To Be Seen, Not Heard. 



And the I-Mark Diesel 
isn't just one of the most 



economical diesel engines 
in its class. It offers a 
combination of quickness, 
quietness, reliability, high 
mileage and low price - 
making it one of the 
world's true economy 
diesels. 

A diesel that not only 
delivers high' RPM's, for 
high performace, but also 
gives you Isuzu's amazing 
"ULTRA-QUICK-ON 
SYSTEM," that makes it 
the world's only diesel 
that's ready to start in- 
stantly. Even at zero". 

A diesel that can go to 
50 faster than perhaps any 
other diesel in its class. 
And go there more 
economically than almost 
any car in the world. 

When you buy an Isuzu 
4-door I-Mark, you get 
more than basic transpor- 
tation. Because an Isuzu 
comes equipped with 
many standard features 
not included in many of 
the world's most luxurious 
cars. 

Like 5 - speed tran- 
smission. Standard. A tilt 
steering wheel. Standard. 
A digital quartz clock. 
Standard. An oil gauge, 
temperature gauge and 
amperage gauge. Stan- 
dard. Maintenance- free 
battery. Standard. 
Tachometer. Standard, 
locking fuel cap. Stan- 
dard. Plus a remote- 
control trunk release. A 
full center console. Rack 
and pinion steering. 
Power assisted front disc 
brakes. Reclining front 
bucket seats and an elec- 
tric rear window defogger. 
All included standard at 
no extra cost. 

The 1983 gas and diesel 
cars from Isuzu. Perfor- 
mance and economy 
redefined. 




The Isuzu Pickup & 4x4, tougher than the worid's 
toughest roads. 



Beneath The Rugged 

Good Looks Of An Isuzu 

Truck, There Beats A 

Heart Of Steel. 

For over 44 years, on 
the toughest roads of the 
world, Isuzu trucks have 
been proving their mettle. 

On the cramped, 
teeming streets of Tokyo 
and Bangkok, through the 
uncivilized jungles of 
Kenya and Haiti. And in 
the frigid wastelands of 
the South Pole, where for 
the past 27 years Isuzu ahs 
been delivering on the 
commitment we made: to 
build some of the 
toughest, most durable 
truck engines ever built. 

Durability that has 
made Isuzu the world's 
largest producer of diesel 
trucks. 

Little wonder that in 
more than 100 countries 
throughout the world, the 
word for tough is Isuzu. 



VANTASTIC SPRING SALE 

On All Custom Vans 



AS LOW AS 



7995 



NO ONE ANYWHERE WILL OUT 
SELL OR OUT TRADE VIRGINIA'S 
LARGEST VAN DEALER. 




WR^^NH|k 



v^m 





463-6100 



3443 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Next To Princess Anne Plaza 

DMV8502 



Perry Buick 

Keeps eamomsy 
in its place. 




WYNNE MOTOR 
CORP. 



1<<KI Ml K( H)l s;4(l-l) 



1-1 \ 'XII /\ 



M2.«W5 



11,2*>5 Mi 1 



^9.495 



EPA4«Hwy.,28City' 

Hie 19SJ 'Buick 5b3>1ai^- 



9.9*70 Financing available 
on these models 

offtt ends May 3lsl, I98J 




EPA 42 Hwy., 27 City 

Hie 19S3 'Biddt »9liai«k. 

PERRY BUICK 

*^i VIRGINIA BEACH BLVD. 
IN NOWOIX AT NEWTOWN ROAD 

SERVING TIDEWATER . .^ „^__ 
* OVER 52 YEARS 461-8855 




^3,495 



■7.795 



K MO (,\l I 



\5,995 



Ml IM I -t N Ml, ( , II |.( 



\M I M ^ 



S.295 ^ 



24 MONTH. 24.000 MILE WARRANTVi 



VVVNM MOIORCORF. 



46 1 -6HUU 



Built To Take It In The 
Cold, Cruel Worid. 

While some truck- 
makers try to project an 
image of producing hard 
working trucks, Isuzu 
-pickups are really built to 
take it. 

Instead of just painting 
our trucks, an Isuzu un- 
dergoes a six-stage process 
which includes cationic 
electroplating, a process 
which coats each Isuzu 
with over 80 incredible 
microns of finish. 

Instead of building 
trucks with ordinary tail- 
gates, Isuzu pickups have 
double-walled tailgates 
that lie flush with the floor 
when opened. 

Instead of giving you 
the ordinary cargo 
capacity of a regular 
pickup, an Isuzu is built to 
carry ab bigger payload. 
So our regular pickup has 
a capacity of 37.0 cubic 
feet. And our longbed has 



45.7 cubic feet, making it 
the longest, biggest bed in 
the imported class. 

And instead of building 
an ordinary 4 x 4, an Isuzu 
may well be the toughest 4 
X 4 you'll ever find off the 
road. 

With the rugged front 
independent suspension 
torsion-bars and double 
wishbone supports. With 
automatic locking front 
hubs, triple skid plates 
and front disc brakes. 
Along with a compact 
single-unit transmission/ 
transfer case. 

What's more, the Isuzu 
4 X 4 not only gives you 
superior highway mileage 
on the road, it also makes 
it easier to drive off the 
•^oad. Isuzu's automatic 
.ocking hubs let you 
engage the wheels from in- 
side the cab. Once 
engaged Isuzu's instant 
shifting lets you shift from 
two-wheel to four-wheel 
drive without stopping. 

Because the Isuzu 4x4 

earned its stripes in the 

field. 

The Isuzu G200ZL Gas 

Engine, born to run, and 

Keep on running. 

If you want to get a 
feeling of power, just sit 
behind the wheel of an 
Isuzu. 

Because after 67 years 
of designing, re-designing 
and torture testing 
engines, Isuzu engineers 
have developed power 
plants worthy of the name 
Isuzu. 

The Isuzu G200ZL is a 
single overhead cam 1 .9 
liter engine, with advan- 
ced hemispherical com- 
bustion chambers and 
crossflow port configur- 
ation, resulting in high 
combustion efficiency and 
increased horsepower for 
1983. 



Parkway Isuzu Grand Opening 

Parkway Isuzu, Inc., Chesapeake's newest 
Automobile Dealership will celebrate its' Grand 
Opening Today and will become Chesapeake's only ex- 
clusive Japanese import d«der. 

Tommy Gibbs. President of Parkway Pontiac- Volvo, 
Inc. and Ashton Lewis, President of Bill Lewis 
Chevrolet in Portsmouth, are the principal stock 
holders. Mr. Gibbs will serve as President. 



6.9% 

ON ALL NEW 
PONTIACS 



AMT. 




* 


nNANCE 
CHAIGE 


TOTAL 

rMttstft 


MONTHLY 
PAVMENT 


FINANCED 


Mm. 


SMO 


» 


*.» 


sm.m 


ssm.m 


M4.IS 


««M 


M 


».» 


m.u 


M».a 


II4.N 


•mm 


M 


*.» 


W.M 


T7M.M 


2IS.II 


KM 


3t 


t.9 


I7».M 


W».« 


I4».U 


MM 


3t 


«.• 


mM 


»■».» 


JTI.4» 




M 


t.9 


IH9.U 


1I.M9.M 


3M.3I 


UIM 


M 


*.* 


m*M 


I342*.M 


33*. 14 


lltN 


3* 


i.« 


iMM 


uauM 


3M.»T 


9IM 


-B" 


— IT' 


M*.M 


amM 


114.11 


MM 


« 


t.» 


liR.N 


TIS2.M 


14*.« 


IMt 


M ' 


!.• 


I34S.2I 


I34S.1I 


I73.M 


MM 


M 


*.* 


lOT.U 


9S37.12 


IM.M 


MM 


41 


1.9 


im.44 


1«,7».44 


213.S3 


IMN 


« 


I.* 


mi.tt 


ii,m.H 


ZM.37 


IINI 


« 


M 


1I14JI 


13,I14.M 


273.21 


IMM 


M 


(.» 


2m.n 


ujM.n 


2n.M 



36 MONTHS 
25% DOWN 



WITH APPROVED 
CREDIT 



PONTIAC-VOLVO •# 



Inc. 



Greenbrier Pkwy. & S. MUitary Hwy. 

OneHalf Mile Norths Greenbrier Mall 
420-5450 



You don't give 
up a thing at 
Budget 

1 




WHERE 
YOU'RE 




• Dqmidabk, well maintained 
tnickt in (he size you nec4 

• MofI ni«]or credit cards 
honored. 

• Power steering and 
automatic transminions 
on most tracks 

Free Pich-up and delivery 

FOR LOCAL RESERVATIONS, CALL: 



486-2500 



Convenient Locatfoiu In: 

NMVOLK, VA. lEACH. POnSMOUTH A CHESAPEAKE 



Ab UMCpCSMMt BSflln SynCM UCCMVt 



'I I I r' 



nENTATKUCX 




Tidewater's Largest 

Inventory Of 

S-10 and K-10 4x4 

Pick-Up Trucks 




Up To 

»2000*» 
Discount! 

(With This Ad) 

Kline Chevrolet 

1495 S. Military Hwy. 

•yW. Soolli •! MINttry Oitle 

424-1811 




RK SACRIFICE PMCES 

NO PROFIT 
SALE 

We are overstocked with new 19K Models that we 
must sdl during April. There's no small print in 
this ad and no gimmicks. Every car is listed 
below. Come in now and pick out the new 1982 
Chevrolet you want. It doesn't matter what it says 
on the sticker, you'll get the car for what it cost us. 
AT NO PROFTT. It's as simple as that. 



Stock! 


Monte Carlo 


Price 


6025 


•9975 


6262 


Cavalier 4 Dr. 


•7575 


6321 


Cavalier 4 Dr. 


•7S75 


6430 


Celebrity 2 Dr. 


•8275 


6074 


Malibu Classic 4 Dr. 


•SS75 


6077 


Monte Carlo 


•9575 


6134 


Malibu Classic 4 Ik. 


•9075 


6IS3 


Cavalier C-L 4 Dr. 


•8675 


6169 


Cavalier 2 Dr.. Hatchback *gl75 \ 


6208 


Cavalier 4 Dr. 


•7975 


6210 


Cavalier 4 Ik. 


•7975 


6432 


Cdebrity 


•8475 


6S32 


Corvette 


•17,429 


6S33 


Corvrtte 


•16,757 


6575 


CeMmty 


•8575 


6590 


CitttiM 


•7875 


6600 


Corvette 


•18,275 


6727 


CtMmty 


•9275 


679S 


Chevrtte 


•5174 


6MI 


caomty 


•8675 


6806 


Otttion 


•7t75 


6874 


Chevette 


*m$ 



cSmSm 




LYNNHAVEN PKWY. AT 
S u«^.Aa,B«J ? VA. BEACH BLVD. 



_i^ 



m 



AYtarof 
Cete&rations 



Celebration Edi 




Inside ! 



The Virginia Beac ^ 



V 



\o 



.x^^^ 



.^^ 



,v^ 



\in 



Virginia Beach In A Box 
Molds Fourth Graders 



ByOregCfOldfarb, 

Sun Editor 

llie children take field trips wearing t-shirts lettered 
with a simple request: Ask Me About Vu^inia Beadi. 
They compile notebods ftill of information about 
\%ginia Beach which are available to locals and 
out-of-towners interested in the burgeoning littoral 
city. The students are regularly quizzed by their 
parents and teachers on local events happening in the 
city. 

Under the auspices of a pr(«ram entitled "Virginia 
Beach In A Box," most of the city's 4,000 fourth grade 
students are well on their way to becoming well 
informed, civic-minded Virginia beach residents. 

The program, said Kingston Elementary Schod 
fourth grade teacher Barbara Jones, is actually a "work 
plan to provide students with informati(m; and to 
motivate them to become involved in the process of 
learning about the city. The students becoire aware of 
who they are and they develop a better awareness, not 
only within their city, but within their iMighborhood." 

In its sixth year of existemx, including a pilot 
program, the "Virginia Beach In A Box" program is 
fonnally taught in the fourth grade from March 29 to 
/^l 29. Informally, it is taught all year. Tlie program 
consists of educational books, notebooks, pamphlets 



and brochures, all of which are specifically related to 
Virginia Beach. The teaching materials are litovlly 
stored and transported in a cardboard box, hence, 
"Virginia Beach In A Box.** 

Hie prc^ram begins with a history of the city dating 
back to 1(K^ and the colonial explOTaticm of Virginia. 
There is a 122-page notebook which serves as a 
complete study of the historic city. In addition, there 
are three books from which teachers draw their daily 
classroom lesson plans. The books are, "The History of 
The Eastern Shore Chapel," "TTie Witch of Pungo." 
which is a crowd fiavorite; and a Virginia Beach OuMe, 
which includes histC87 plus a listing of the city's 
lightUghts and places to go. 

Also included in the box of teaching tools are games, 
maps, and miscellaneous information, such as a history 
of the city seal; a Virginia Beach almanac of technical 
information about the city; an U-minute video tape 
presentation of the city; and an organizational chart of 
the city's government. 

The Sute Board of Education has not mandated that 
all public school systems in the state conduct such a 
program, but it strwigly advises each system to do so, 
said Anna Margaret Rhodes, elementary curriculum 
assistant, math, science and social studies, Virginia 

See STUDENTS, P«^«^^. 



King Neptune's Court 





Judith A. Lint, 
Bayside 



Cynthia Kay Ban, 
Cape Henry 



Beverly Lynn Kidd, 
Cox 



Allison H. MOciver,' 
First Colonial 




Sharen Christie Mendoia, 
Green Run 



' Lisa Andvson, 
KeUmn 



Debra Tate, 
KanpsviUe 



Caroline ShruiH, 
Princess Anne 



A Festival Of Festivals 



By Stuart Cake 

Special To The Sun 

ft started asi an idea, a dream. A festival <A festivals, 
(xntered around a community. A week of fun and 
^-•enjoyment lot the citians of Virginia Beach, hfaw after 
a decatte, the dream has come true, every year for 10 
years. TTiis ye«-*s festival dates are Sept. 28 through 
Oct. 2 for the Tenth Annual Vu-ginia Beach Nej^une 

Festival. . ^ ^ ^ 

AlUwugh some oF the activitks have dumged, the 
focal point of the NeiHune Festival, the selection erf the 
king and his court, still commands the attemion once 
reserved far Renaissance royalty. 

This year's King Neptune Court is no exception. 
Eight princesses were selected to represent each erf the 
eight high schools m Vuginia Beach. A littk Mas 
Neptutw as ««11 as King Neptui« X will also be chosen 
at a later date. The Neptune princesses were selected 
on the basis of »:«tenuc achieven^nts. ho^xs. 
partid|»tk» in school Ktivitks. community involve- 
ment, poise and appearance. 

The |»iiMX$ses wifl »xom|»ny King Ncptui« X at all 
fatival evats ami will serve as goodwill amb^^idors 



throughout the j«ar. Aside from Neptune Festival 
events, the king's court will be available for public 
aiqxarances at civic and charitable events, throughout 
tlM year. (Gall the Virginia Beach Chamber of 
Commerce for information on scheduling appearances). 

The 1983 Rc^al Court is represented as fdlows: 
Bevcriy I«u KUd «r Gok Mgk School^ is the daughter 
of Mr. William L KkU aiui Ms. Qudyn Stubbs. 
Beverly has partkipated in several scholastic activities 
including executive coundl, sophomore class vicc- 
l»vsident, cheerleading squad, fine arts club, Spanish 
Qub, and Homecoming Queen, white maintaining a 
"B" average in her studies. 

"Being a member <rf King Nej^une X's Court would 
mean partidpating in the biggest event in Vu-ginia 
Beadi. U would always be a pleasure to Uxk back and 
say thtt I was a pajx erf this jc^ous event." 

QrMktai Kay terr, representing Gape ifcary Colle- 
giate Sckool, is tt^ daughter (rfMr. and Mrs. RcA)ert A. 
Ban. Ondy has iMuticipated in tte 1982-83 Cape (fenry 
Qflegiate Drama {^odiKtions (rf "The Importam:e of 
Being Earnest", "fcfiss Prism" and "Murdered 
Alive"; aiKl is chairperson of Junior Week. Qndy 
See KING, Pa^ 5 



Studenb in Barbara Jones' foarth grade class at Kingston Elementary School read The yirginia Beach Sun to 
keep abreast of community events and news. They do so as part of the " Vliginia Beach In A Box" program. 



Ceremonies A t Pavilion 



Cify Honors 37 Who Shaped Merger 



People responsible for 
the history-making 1%3 
merger of Virginia Beach 
and Princess Anne County 
were recently honored 
during ceremonies held at 
Pavilion Theatre. 

Between 300 and 350 
people were in attendance. 
The event was part of the 
city's 20th birthday 
celebration. 



Those honored were: 
Consolidation Commit- 
ttee: Sidney S. Kellam 
and J. W. Wood, co- 
chairmen. Committee 
members were, A. L. 
Bonney; Lee Bonney; L. 
Charles Burlage; Noland 
C. Chandler; Frank E. 
Dickerson; D. W. 
Gregory; Clayton Q. 
Nugent, Sr.; Roger L. 



Riggs; Alton E. Williams; 
Archibald G. Robertson, 
Esq.; and Harry Frazier, 
III, Esq. 

Executive Merger 
Committee: Ivan D. 
Mapp, chairman; V. A. 
Etheridge; John V. Fen- 
tress; William H. Phillips; 
Louis Smith; R. R. Mc- 
Chesney; and Grace Swer- 
tfeger, executive secretary. 



Princess Anne County 
Board of Supervisors, 
1962: S. Paul Brown, 
chairman; Carroll G. 
Clough; James G. I^r- 
den; Kenneth N. White- 
hurst, Sr.; James E. 
Snyder; and Swindell 
Pollock. 

Virginia Beach City 
Council, 1962; Frank A. 

See FOUNDERS, Pate 8 




Pavilion Tower Completion On Schedule 



Construction is on schwhile for Pavilion Tower, 
A Dunfey Resort and Conference Center, due to 

<^}enJttMl. 

Locat«l adjacent to Pavilion, the Vfrgmia 
Beach Convention Center, the 300-room, 12-story 
luxury hotel is aimed at attracting major meetings 



ami inventions to Virpriia Betth as'w^ as 
providing first-class tourist acxommodations. 
Among its feature are meeting fKiUties tm^to 
725 people. lighted tennis courts, indoor swfaa- 
ming pool, a health si» and fitnea eaim, awi a 
bar, restaurant and cafe. 



2 Virginia Beach Sun, April 27. 1983 



Sun Commentary 



iiiiii 



Editorials 



If 



BIE Day 



It's hard to imagine Mrs. George Bush, 
the Vice President's refin^, dignified 
wife as a cheerleader. Yet, in the battle 
against illiteracy that's how she described 
herself recently as the keynote speaker 
during Virginia Beach's first Business- 
Industry-Education (BIE) Day. 

Mrs. Bush left her pom-poms, pleated 
skirt and letter sweater in D.C., but 
brought to the Virginia Beach Pavilion a 
megaphone full of facts about illiteracy 
which she articulated with the expressed 
intention of "frightening" the 300 assem- 
bled BIE Day participants into an in- 
creased awareness of the onerous 
drawbacks of functional illiteracy. 

Mrs. Bush told business people, 
educators and counselors that there are at 
least 23 million functional illiterates in 
this country, and maybe as many as 53 
million. 

One querist ask^ Mrs. Bush for her 
definition of illiterate. She answered by 
example, indicating that many members 
of the Armed Foi^ can't read rifle 
operations manuals. Many others, she 
said, can't fill out job or driver's license 
application forms. 

Mrs. Bush said more than 800,000 young 
prople have dropped out of high school, 
and that thousands graduate each year 
without basic reading and writing skilN . . 

Mrs. Bush beseeches parents, teachers 
and libraries to become more involved in 
children's education, and expressed 
remorse that m(»t teachers are "under- 
paid, overworked and underpraised." 

Problems and Solutions 

"niepmbl&ca of illiteracy Bas been wdl 
publicized. It will remain a problem until 
solutions are found, or at least attempted. 
BIE Day not only address^ the question 
of perpetuating basic skills, but in an un- 
precedented move in this city, it formally 
brought business and industry leaders 
together with teachers and guidance 



counselors so the latter could receive a 
practical hands-on feel for what business 
is demanding and expecting of its future 
employees who are now still in school. 

Virginia Beach teachers and counselors 
were paired with various businesses in the 
city which invited the educators into their 
firnis to talk with their employees. They 
discussed present-day problems 
busin^ses face and how tomorrow's em- 
ployees will be expected to meet and deal 
with those concerns. 

BIE Day was sponsored by the Virginia 
Beach Chamber of Commerce Education 
Committee; the Virginia Beach Education 
AssociationTask Force CARE; the 
Virginia Beach City Public School Ad- 
ministration; and the Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce business mem- 
bers. <Note: the Education Committee is 
but one of about 16 Virginia Beach 
Chamber of Commerce standing commit- 
tees). 

The Education Committee Chair- 
woman Jane Braithwaite pulled together 
the people who produced the BIE Day. 
Many people worked hard to make the 
day a success. 

Ruth Page, an elementary school 
teacher and a member of the VBEA Task 
Force CARE was responsible for bringing 
Mrs. Bush to Virginia Beach. Robert Reid 
and John H. McLaughlin, both Virginia 
Beach businessmen, were responsible for 
arranging the businesses participation in 
the day. 

In anticipation of next year's BIE Day, 
this year's participants completed a 
questionnaire whk;h will be used to 
determine how next year's event oui be 
made even more responsive to the need of 
Virginia Beach's educational and business 
communities. 

Virginia Beach's first BIE Day was a 
civic success. Congratulations and a 
thank you are in order to all who par- 
ticipated. — G.D.G. 



Try A Door 



A petite teem^^e girl sat following a 
recent Virginia Beach new wave, or 
modem rock, concert, her foot soaking in 
a bucket of ice water. Her white stockings 
had brown footmarks all over them. She 
had been knocked down and trampled; a 
victim of "slam dancing." 

It's not that everyone who is around the 
unusual activity is injured, but in general 
sUun dancing is one of the most stupid 
and dangerous fads to sweep the ar«i. 

Don't be misled. This juvenile physical 
phenomenon in no way even remotely 
resemble any form of dancing. It doesn't 
formally include girb, and is really more 
akin to brawling. The only difference 
between "slamming" and fighting is that 
instead of fists, bodies are hurled at each 
other at maximum force. 

Slam dancing amounts to no more than 
guys taking running starts and repeatedly 
slamming into «u:h other until someone 
falls down. Or, they slam into each other 
and try to flip oi^ another over onto the 
hard floor. 

This behavior might be recusable on a 
football field. But not at crowded concer- 
ts or dances where most of these 
ridiculous antics occur. And therein lies 
the danga. 

At many coi^Rts there is usually a sea 
of people clustered in front of the stage's 
apron. Literally hundreds of bodies are 
jammed so cl<»e togsthcr there is hardly 
room to sway gently, much less play 



tackle. When the music starts, people 
start grooving to the beat; some moving 
more energetically than others. Con- 
sequently, pushing and shoving ensues. 
The weaker of h«ul try to get out of the 
way as the stout-hearted young men try to 
assert their false masculinity and true 
youthfulness by pushing each other 
around. Eventually the sea of people gives 
way to an open arena in the cento* of the 
group^ The slammers puU their arms to 
their chests and use their bodies as bat- 
tering rams to knock the daylights out of 
their friends. 

If these people want to act like balls in a 
pinbaU machine that's their busin<»s. But 
the element of danger enters when in- 
nocent bystanders, who are trying to en- 
joy the music, become the victims of this 
irrational behavicH-. For example, while 
many of the concert attendees are tum^ 
in the direction of the stage, the slammers 
are behind them acting up. As the slam- 
mers play rockem-sockem robots, 
someone unsuspecting may be on the 
receiving end of a potentially dangerous 
jolt. 

Slam dancing should stop. Club and 
th«itre owners should not allow it. Bands 
ought not encoura^ it. If people can't go 
out and dance and luive a good time 
without jeopardizing the safety of them- 
selv» and others, they should stay home. 
If they want to slam MMoething, try 
dooi^.— G.D.G. 



Voice Of The People 



What Is Virginia Beach's Greatest Asset? 




"It'a a aict ana. it'a 
4ldrt. It's atyi got rou- 
try. TMc pco^ wt iwOy 
rice aad tkey treat otker 
people very tMy.* 



Occaaa avtotlM adaria. 
Foar-fliMdi naideBt 



"Hie higli quality of 
coBiBiaBity service 
^t^raais offered througk 
the dty's paUic schoob, 
Dbrarks, and other agen- 
dca." 

Mary Spenoer, 

Educator, 

24-year resideat 



"I tkink it's the people 
aflMl the rccreatloa. We're 
dose eaoiigh to the oceaa 
and to the mouatalBa. We 
have a variety of people 
that make Vlrgiaia Beach 
internting." 

CharieneDvaoui, 

Stadeat, 

17-year rcsidert 



"I thiak it's the variety, 
iadadlug the cnltvral ac- 
tivities avaihiMe. We also 
have the heachfroat and 
the rand parl( areas. Also, 
ttw dhwiity of the in- 
dairies. 

Margaret G. Covington, 

Spedficatioas writer, 

five-year resident 



Letters To The Editor 



EVMS: "I Am Unable To See Evil, Only Good" 



Editor: 

TTie purpose oi this letter is to urge your readers to 
support the Vir^nia Bau:h contribution to Eastern 
Vtfginia Medical School. 

This very excellent medical school brings the 
following direct benefits to the Gty of Virginia Beach: 

•Mnty-fivc Virginia Beach residents are graduates. 

•The school employs 309 Virginia Beach residents. 

•PayroO to these Vurginia Beach employees was 
$7,000,000 in 1982. 

•In 1982. the school purdiased SSOO.OOO worth of 
^equipment and services in Vii^inia ^mh. 
^ •The school prondts $100,000 per year in indigent 
/cal-e and medkwl education in Virginia Beach, at 
'Virginia Beach General Hospital, Bayside Hospital and 
Tidewater Psychiatric Institute. 

1 know there are strong feelings by a small group 
regarding the In Vitro Program. I also know that the 
scientisu, professon. and physicians at the Medical 
School are without exce[Hion extremely talented, 
dedicated indi^uals (tf high moral character. Lxx^ng 
at the alternatives, would it be better if the In Vitro 
I^cgram were subdued now only to spring up later in 
the hamls <si\tis dedicated people? When I witness the 
happiness, love, aiul adoration of the mother and father 
toward the beautiful babies that the In Vitro Program 



brings I am unaUe to see evO. only good. 

On the personal side, my daughter. 1977 Valedictor- 
ian at First Colonial H]«h School, is a second year 
medical student at E.V.M.S. She is doing well and my 
entire family finds the medical schotA whdesome and 
dedicated to academic, scientific, and medical excel- 
lence. I was particularly impressed with the emphasis 
the school places on the delicate relationship between 
physician and patient and also the desire to pdish the 
medical students. If I had to face the tuition of a private 
medical school, my daughter would most probably not 
jbe a medical stifdeiit today. 

^ In the wbrds of Dr. Htm f. "Eastern Virginia 
^ledlcal School bekxigs to the seven cities of 
Tidewater." Students are selected mostly from 
Tidewater as part (rf the selection process. Hie schod 
provides direct benefits to Vurginia Beu:h, some of 
which are mentioned in paragraph one. Virginia 
Beach's support has been established since 1975. 
Inflation has eroded that support by more than SO"?!!. 
Instead of withdrawing that support without warning, I 
believe consideration should be given not just to 
continuing it but to increasing that support. 

Roger G. Pyle, 
Virginia Beach 



Sun 
Flower 




Summer Sun And Flowers 

The hat, summer sun. It brings to mind steamy 
days at the be«:h, beautiful sunsets and general 
lounging around. For numy flowers, however, the 
summer sun can mean ^idlting or succumbing to 
teat stress. 

A number of i^ants, however, soak up the 
sununer sun like sun worshii^ers in Virginia 
Beadi. 

Oie oi the best plants for sunny spots is the 
gazania. It loves as miKh sunlight as it can get 
and thrives in dry soil condMons. The daily-like 
flowers ckxe wtih temperature changes adding to 
tlwir interest. Sonw of the t>est hybrid gazanias 



are in the "Sundance" series from Pan-American 
Seed Company. Gardeners can choose between 
"Sundance Red" and a mix which indudes such 
"hot" cdors as bronze, bright yellow, red and 
bicdors. Another excellent "hot" variety is 
"Gdden Margarita", a gazainia with 3-inch 
gdden yellow blooms. Hiey also make exceUent 
cut flowers and can be used effectively in rock 
gar dens. 

Another sun-loving flower, which also makes an 
excellent cut flower, is the gerbera or Afi%an 
Daisy. It has daisy-like. 3 to 4-inch flowers aiKl 
long stems which can grow up to 12 inches. 

Try "Happipot" for tmde variety of odor. It 
comes in Inright shades ^red. rose, pink, salmon, 
orange, yellow and cream. It is especially 
successful as a container (^mt, alone or in 
combination with other flowers. 

Oound cover plants for sunny spots are also 
available. Two rf the best are portulaca and vinca. 
Both have plants with sfveading growth habits 
which can cover large be<b aiul other plantings. 
I\)rtulaca is a tough i4ant that ^rows well in full 
sun. dry soil ami even in soil )yhidi is almost 
completely sand, tt forais a kxxe, wandering mat 
of steins and snuUl leaves with small. rose-Uke 

SeeOAIU>EhS,Pa^4 



What's On Your Mind? Let Us Know! 

The Vbrgmki BvkH &m wekpme and encouraga letters to the editor on any ami all Virginia Beach 
issiMS. as wdl as any t^aa tewes, questions or cowxms affecting the wdl bdng of the Virginia B«u:h 
ctHnmunity. Letten sImmiU be typed. dcMible spaced and inchule the writes naaM, address ami telephone 
nuniber. Mail lettoi to The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 S. Roscmont Road. Vi^nia Beach, Va. 234S2. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

13t SoBth RosemoBt RomI, Virgiiiia Beadi, Va. 23452 Phimc (10^ 486-3430 
USPS-660-140; PabUshed WcdMadays 



GrcgGoldfarfe 
EdHw 



IEiehaNW.CiMfd,Sr. 



Within Tickwater Area 

One Year $9 

All Ot)^ Areas 

One Year $11 

Two Years- $17 

SeccN^ Ck» PMtage u p^ at Lynntei^i ^atk», 

Vir^oM Beadi, Virp^ 

I%f F|p;^Rto flta* Am is a BM^CT rf The Vlr^te BeadK 



^\ 



<\ 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 27. 1983 3 



Virsinia Beach Sun Bulletin Board 



i^CIVIC 



. G.F.W.C. Oc«»n Park Woman's Club will meet 
on Wednesday, May II, at 11 a.m., luncheon at 
12 noon, in the clubroom at the Ocean Park fire- 
house. 

Mrs. David M. Whitaker, SUte Arts Chairman 
of the Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs will 
be the speaker. 

Mrs. H. E. Wittersheim and Mrs. C. B. Cash 
and their Group will be in charge of the luncheon. 

Mrs. H. L. Barnes is president of the Ocean 
Park Woman's Club. 



Amy Spencer models a hudmade quilt made 
by members, friends and neigiibors of the 
Virginia Beach Christian Churcli. It is one of the 
crafts wliich will be raffled at the church's 
"Spring Fling." The pillow has already been sold. 
Amy is a student at ivtu B. Dey Elementary 
School. 

"Spring PliB9"S«t 

The Virginia Beach Christian Church will hdd a 
"Spring Hing," on Saturday, April 30 beginning 
at 10 at a.m. at the churdi. 

The church is located Oh the ccmer of Rose Hall 
Drive and Great Neck Road in the Lynnhaven 
b(V(Mgh. ^ 

Booth space is still available. Crafts and while 
elephants will be available. Food will be sold. 

Proceeds go into the church building fund. Call 
481-3494 or 481-0736 for more informatioi. 



Ca valiM' WoMMii IIMet, Travel 

The Cavalier Garden Club will hold its April 
meeting and luncheon on Wednesday, April 27, at 
Princess Anne Country Clu6. Guest speaker will 
be Mrs. W. Hugh Moomaw whose subject will be 
Oriental Line Arrangements. 

On May 4, 1983, members of Cavalier Garden 
Club will take a tour to Mount Airy in Warsaw, 
Va. They will lunch at The Tides Inn at Irvington, 
Va., and then tour another home in Matthews 
County on the return trip. 





The First Annual May Day Boardwalk Run to 
benefit the Virginia Beach Volunteer Rescue 
Squad will be held on Sunday, May i at 1 p.m. 

Co-sponsored by Fogg's seafood restaurant and 
the Captain's Table restaurant, this four mile run 
will include a beach party following the run with 
hot dogs. BBQ. cole slaw, potatoe salad, and^ 
Budweiser beer ... All you can eat and drink . 

The tax deductible entry fee is $15 and includes 
a custom T-shirt and the beach party following the 
run. Times and time clock provided by the Tide- 
water Striders. 

Send entry fees to: Fogg's seafood mtaurant, 
415 Atlantic Avenue, Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23451. Pick up T-shirts, race numbers, and late 
registration at 11:30 a.m. For further information 
call 428-3644 or 422-4308. 



The City of Virginia Beach Arts and 
Humanities Commission, Budget and Finance 
Committee, will meet on Monday, May 2 at 4 
p.m. in the Pavilion conference room. 

The public is invited. 



■•«lstM' To V«t« Oa City Nail Day 

The U.S. Department of Justice has approvec 
voters registration for the City of Virginia Beack 
City Hall Day - Saturday, April 30, 1983. Citizen' 
can register to vote at the General Registrar's Of- 
fice at the Virginia Beach Municipal Center from 
10a.m. to4p.m. 

All residents are invited to come to City Hall 
Day to participate in all the activities and to 
register to vote. 



City Hall Day S«t 

The City of Virginia Beach will hold a City Hall 
Day in celebration of the City's 20th Birthday on 
Saturday, April 30. 

Activities will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 
the Virginia Beach Municipal Center. Highlights 
of the day include a parade beginning at 10:30 
a.m. featuring the U.S. Navy Chuting Stars, 21 
units of Khedive Temple, three high school mar- 
ching bands and much more. 

At 2 p.m. there will be a birthday cake cutting 
ceremony. During the day there will be something 
for everyone including demonstrations, displays, 
entertainment, crafts, games, etc. 

For further information, contact the Virginia 
Beach Public Information Office from 8 a.m. to 9 
p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Saturday and Sun(^ay at 427-4 1 1 1 . 



1^ ENTERTAINMENT 



C«i«iNtitioiiDai 

The Oceanfront Jaycees will hold a celebration 
dance, in honor of the city's birthday celebration, 
on Saturday, April 30 from 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. at 
the Virginia Beach Dome. 
, Continuous music will be provided. Donations 
are $4 in advance, $5 at the door. Ticket proceeds 
go to the Virginia Beach maritime Historical 
Museum. Refreshment proceeds go to various 
local charities. 

Tickets are available from any member of the 
Oceanfront Jaycees, at the Maritime Museum, the 
Pavilion and at the E>ome. 





THE 

DISABLED 

AMERICAN VETERANS 

NEED YOUR HELP! 



WE NEED: CLOTHING, 

Mens, Women's and Children's. 

Also, Books • Toys • Linens • Bedding 

• Housewares and CMna. 



CALL 461-4938 



FAST 



And Dependabte, 
Pick UpSmrvkt 



\ 



WE CAN USE PICTURES, TABLES, CHAIRS, 
LAMPS AND MUCH MORE. 



TAX DEDUCTIBLE 



Please Call 461-4938 
Today—Thank You. 



1 



Am 



Today...inaiiK lou. ^1 



^ 



A Year of 
Celetjrations 



Wall off Voodoo At Cavalior 

The musical group Wall of Voodoo will be in 
concert on Friday, April 29 at the Cavalier Beach 
Club. 



Brooks Pknrt At Pirtf Coloaiol 

The Mel Brooks Musical Comedy, "All 
American," will be presented in the First Colonial 
High School auditorium on April 28 and 29 at 8 
p.m. TickeU are $3 for adults and $2 for students. 



VWC Slogors %ipitim% CoMOrt 

The Virginia Wesleyan College Chamber 
Singers will present their annual spring concert at 
8 p.m. on Thursday, April 28, in the Hofheimer 
Theater. The performance is free and open to the 
public, but reservations should be made by calling 
the college switchboard at 461-3232. 

Dr. R. David Clayton, associate professor of 
music, is director of the Chamber Singers. 



^EDUCA TIONAL 



Notional SocrotorioaWook 

The Professional Secretaries International has 
announced that Virginia Beach secreuries will 
celebrate National Secretaries Week during the 
last week in April. Secretaries Day is Wednesday 
of that week -April 27, 1983. 

The local chapter of PSl is sponsoring special 
events of interest to all secretaries in the Tidewater 
Area - and all are invited to attend. 
~For more information contact Vicky Koch at 
her office 627-861 1 , Ext. 252, during the day, or in 
the evening at 495-2242. 



JUmwal ftvdoot Art Show 

The annual student art show at the Virginia 
Beach Campus of Tidewater Community College 
will open in the school library on Friday, May 6, 
with a 7:30 p.m. awards ceremony and continue 
through Wednesday, May 18. 

Bene Wilson, artist and owner of Wilson 
Gallery in Norfolk, will judge the show and 
present the awards. $225 in prize money will be 
awarded including a $75 purchase award for best 
in show. 

The following week, Tuesday, May 10, Virginia 
Beaeh i^ottefr Jamd Chalkle^ will present' a 
ceramics demo«nstration aJ 1 2:30 p.m. in B-JOO. 
I The show and demonstration are free and open 
to the public. 

Library hours are Monday through Thursday, 
7:45 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday, 7:45 a.m. to 8 p.m., 
and Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 



^HEALTH 



Nooroffibronato'sls Bonoflt 

The National Neurofibromatoris Foundation, 
Inc., Virginia Tidewater Chapter, will hold a 
"cut'-a-thon for research" at Pembroke Mall on 
Monday. May 23 from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. The 
event is sponsored locally by Rudy and Kelly Hair- 
stylists, Pembroke Mall. 

Neurofibromatosis is a genetic disorder which 
affects 100,000 Americans. John Merrick, "The 
Elephant Man," was a victim of the disease. 

Call 1-539-7124 for more information. 



Pot Caro Loctvro 

"Infectious Diseases" is the topic of a free pet 
care lecture in BTC-I at the Virginia Beach Cam- 
pus of Tidewater Community College Wednesday, 
May 4, at 7:30 p.m. 
For more information, call 428-6201 . 



Congratulations 
Virginia Beach 



PHIIUPS, 



M^eNowHflve 340-54M 

Bait, Gas & Ice 

(Fresh BiUtA Tackle) 



•C3S>^ 



Look for our 
Grand Opening Soon! 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
Transmission • Brakes • Tune up 
• Gei^ral Rqjairs • 



r 



.u 



Mail news lo The Virginia Beacii Sun, IM S. RmcmonI 
Road, Virginia Bcack. Va. 23452 



,^ SPECIAL EVENTS 



immnmy 

The Virginia Beach Racquet Club in Virgmia 
Beach, from June 6 to 12 is the site of the fifth 
"Masters" event on the five-tournament Segment 
Two of the 1983 United States Tennis Association 
Circuit of men's professional satellite tournamen- 
ts. 

Now in its fifth year on a national scale the 
USTA Circuit is a highly competitive, 25-tourna- 
ment tour which provides rookie and veteran ten- 
nis professionals as well as top-level amateurs with 
tournaments to test and improve their skills. 

Current Grand Prix headliners such as Chip 
Hooper, Jimmy Arias, Mike Bauer and Johan 
Kriek all moved up to their present lofty positions 
in pro tennis through the ranks of the USTA 
satellite tour. 

Since each tournament attracts the best up-and- 
coming players from around the world, the USTA 
Circuit provides fans and the sports media with a 
first-hand look at the tennis stars of tomorrow. 



"Sopor Poopo r Ovonii«ht" 

The Boys Club of Virginia Beach, 4441 South 
Blvd., is holding a "Super Dooper Overnight" for 
its members on beginning on Friday, April 29, at 9 
p.m. until 8 a.m. Saturday. EvenU includes: 
rollerskating, putt-putt golf, and the movie 
"Dragon Slayer." A substance abuse prevention 
film will be shown starting the overnight. For 
membership information, call 499-23 11. ext. 39. 



lolor Inorgy Workshop tot 

Earl R. Seeber, Jr., will present "The Non- 
Technical Orientation to Active Solar Energ^ 
Systems" on Thursday, May 5, in the Great Neck 
Area Library (1251 Bayne Drive) in Virginia 
Beach. 

The workshop will begin at 7:30 p.m. and last 
approximately one hour. 

Interested adults may register by contacting the 
Great Neck Area Library at 481-6094. 



Moaoy Rohod Por Olynplct 

More than $1,400 was raised for the United 
States Olympic Committee following a night of 
amateur boxing matches held recently at Rogue's. 

Twelve amateur fights were featured, with 289 
spectators in attendance. 



SonTrofc'ta 

The Tidewater Solar Energy ASWdatloff fws 
announced Sun Trek '83. The tour will start at 
either of two reception centers: Tidewater Com- 
munity College in Virginia Beach; and Family 
Dentistry, 900 West Little Creek Road, Norfolk. 

The tour will take participants to 18 different 
buildings which utilize solar design. Homes will be 
open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

The tour will be held on Saturday, May 14 

Call 424-5564 for more information. 



Afghan Ownors M oo t 

The Tidewater Afghan Hound Club, and its 
Virginia Beach members, will hold its spring mat- 
ch - rain or shine at Lakewdbd Park - Theater 
area. 

The public is invited. The show starts at noon. 
For more information contact Joann Chidress, 
623-2657. 



lodottrkil Arta Show tot 

The annual Virginia Beach Public Schools Industrial 
Arts Show will be held at Pembroke Mall in Virginia 
Beach on Friday and Saturday, April 29 and 30, from 10 
a.m. to 9 p.m. each day. 

In addition to static displays of student's industrial 
arts projects, the show will feature live activities such 
as 062 powered model car races, pottery wheel 
demonstrations, making screwdrivers with plastic 
injection molding, and sUk screen printing. All 
activities involve skills the students learned in their 
industrial arts classes. 

The public is invited to attend. 



Happy Birthday 
Virginia Beach 



CiMton md producers 0I iinattty, hw cost 

OFFSET NEWSPAPERS 
AndCIRCULAKS 



midlaymitmrvktt. 



BYERLY PUBUCATIONS 



UK 627-5020 ft QmMM 



MOI 



■an 



fli 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, April 27, 1983 



Yirsinia Beach Sun News 



■■« 




Affirmative And Negative 



Inde. Jr. High Wins Tourney 



Independence Junior 
High students won the 
annual Virginia Beach 
Junior High School de- 
bate tournament held 
earlier this month at 
Plaza Junior High, 
becoming the first junior 
high team to win both 
affirmative and negative 
championships in regular 
season and tournament 
competition in the school 
division. 

Unlike senior high 
debate competition 
where schools can com- 



pcxz in regional and state 
meets sponsored by the 
Virginia High School 
League, junior high 
debate in Virginia Beach 
public schools is limited 
to competition within ihe 
division. However, 
Virginia Beach Public 
Schools is the only 
school division in the 
state to offer competitive 
debate between schools 
for its junior high 
students. 

Junior high debate pits 
students taking affir- 



mative and negative 
stances on specific 
topics; the Independence 
team not only won both 
the affirmative and 
negative rounds of the 
championship tourna- 
ment but also won five 
of the six meets held 
during the school year. 

The second pl«» af- 
firmative team in the 
tournament was from 
Princess Anne Junior 
High; third place affir- 
mative went to Kemps- 
ville Junior. Students 



from the same school 
teams also won second 
place and third place 
negative, respectively. 

Individual honors 
went to: 

Affirmative: Marlowe 
Keesecker, Princess An- 
ne, 1st; Andrew Green- 
berg, Independence, 
2nd; and Tina Scanlon, 
Princess Anne, 3rd. 

Negative: Janey 
Davenport. Independen- 
ce, 1st; Mike Aaglan, 
Princess Anne, 2nd; and 
Brett Rhinehardt, Lyn- 
nhaven, 3rd. 



Brian Caton, Scott Tanner and Jennifer Shu 



Annual Spelling Bee 

Shu Wins Twice In A Row 



Gardens Becoming More Colorful 



Fot the second consecutive year, Jennifer Shu, a 
junior at Green Run High schod, has won the Virginia 
Beach Public Schools Spelling Bee senior high schod 
(grades 10-12) championship round. Dr. Roy A. Woods, 
Qiairman of the Virginia Beach School Board, 
presented the third annual spelling bee trophy to her 
following the recent competition held at First Colonial 
High Schod. 

The runner-up in the senio* high competition was 
Wayne Scott, an 11th grader at Kellam High School, 
who also received a trophy. 

On the yamox high level (grades 7-9), Scott Tanner, a 
7th gader at Kemps Landing Intermediate School, was 
the winner of a long champicmship rcHind. The 
runner-up was Kiaran Snyder, a 7th grader at King's 
Grant Elementary Schod. There were 16 c(»itestants in 
the junior high competiticm, one from each of the eight 
junior highs, one from each of the two intermediate 
schods, and one from each of the sue elementary 
schools that have a 7th grade. 

Virginia Beach Public Schods I>eputy Superinten- 
dent E. Bruce McGuire presented trc^hies to the 
winner and runner-up in the junicx- high competition. 

Brian Caton, a 6th grader at Windsor Oaks 
Elementary Schod won the elementary (grades 4-6) 
championship round; the runner-up was Jennifer 
Hicks, a 6th grader at Malibu Elementary Schod. Their 
trophies were presented by Walter N. C^rrdl, Virginia 
Beach Public Schods assistant superintendent for 



Instructicmal Services. 

The four elementary contestants in the championship 
competition were each wiimers in the four elimination 
rounds held last mcmth. Direct competitim between all 
43 elementary schods in the dty is nd feasible; thus 
the eliminaticm rounds are set up by geographic areas. 

The judges ftx the championship round were Dennis 
Hartig, Virginia Beach assistant managing editor of the 
Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star; Greg Goldfarb, editor 
of The Virginia Beach Sun; and Evonnc Whit more, 
WVEC-TV (Channel 13) news reporter. Spelling bee 
recorders were Mrs. Connie Cde, Chapter I Elemen- 
tary Language Arts curriculum assistant and Mrs. 
Paula Tortolini, Elementary Language Arts curriculum 
assistant. The prcmouncer was Robert Burchette, 
Marketing Manager, Virginia East/West, Chesapeake 
and Potomac Telephone Ompany. 

Joe Lowenthal, Virginia Beach Public Schools public 
information officer, was the master of ceremaiies for 
the elimination rounds and the championship competi- 
tion. James Darden, staff assistant to the assistant 
superintendent fOT instructional services, had the 
overall responsibility for the schods' spelling bee 
competiticm. 

In addition to the trophies presented to winners and 
runners-up, all students who participated in the 
championship rounds were given participaticxi pins and 
certificates. 



Continued from Page 2 

flowers. One of the brightest and liveliest 
varieties is "Wildfire". This plant has flowers in a 
sunny mix of yellow, orange and rose. It makes a 
fine annual ground cover and can also be planted 
in hanging baskets to add exuberant life to a 
sunny porch ot patio. 

Vinca is another sun-lover which also stands up 
well to heat, air pdlution and insects. Some 
varieties have a more upright, bushier habit than 
portulaca, but other varieties have a ground-cov- 
ering growth habit. One of the best is "Pink 
Carousel", a spreading variety which bears 
quantities of pink flowers tinged in white on the 
edges. "Pink Carousel" makes a fine container or 
hanging-basket plant. With its shiny, dark green 
fdiage and bright flowers, it makes a striking 
display. 

For more upright growth you should ccmsider a 
new vinca. "Morning Mist" from Denhdm 
Seeds. "Morning Mist" produces flowers in 
clusters, an azalea-like blooming habit. The 
clusters of blossoms, white with pink eyes, which 
sit above the dark, shiny fdiage really catch the 
eye! 

Many begcmias, too, now take to the sun, 
fibrous begcHiias are adaptable to beds, borders, 
baskets and pots. Three varieties which make 
great cranpanions are "Viva" with white flowers, 



"Scarletta" in red, and "Linda" in jHnk. 
Bronze-fdiaged varieties include the "Jets" from 
Pan-Amrican Seed, in pink, white, red and rose. 
ComjHict begonias such as these, which grow 
from six to eight inches, make excellent edging 
iriants. Two new begonias with a vigorous growth 
habit and large flowers are the "Avalanches" in 
pink and white from Pan-American Seed. The 
"Avalanche" Series also has exceptional heat 
tderance. 

For even more variety in sunny spots, don't 
forget zinnias. Plant breeders have really created 
a diversity of forms, sizes and cdors which allow 
gardeners to use zinnias in virtually any garden 
situation. The gardener can choose from dwarf 
zinnias, growing from 10 to IS inches, or larger 
zinnias growing up to 36 inches. Among the best 
are the new "Pulcinos". TUs new group comes in 
shades of brcmze, lavender, red, rose, salmon, 
yellow and a mix. The flowers are nicely double 
and the plants have a bushy, compact naoit 
making them excellent for borders and beds. They 
also make beautiful cut flowers. 

The best part of planting fa* many gardeners is 
the chdce with flowers of every shape and hue, 
conbined with variety of growth habit and foliage 
of diverse texture. Is it any wonder that gardens 
under the summer sun are becoming niore color- 
ful, year by year? 



Happy Anniversary Virginia Beach 





Linctt ^ jeujelers 



We repair 
jewelry 



WHOLESALE TO THE PUBLIC 
Our Jewelry Starts at... 

50% OFF RETAIL 



We make 
custom jewelry 



DIAMOND SOLITAIRES 




Unett ^ jeujelcfs 

WHOLESALE TO THE PUBLIC 



2976 Va. Beach Blvd. 

(Near Tand<m's Pine Tree Inn) 

Va. Beach, VA 
OPEN MONDAY - FRIDAY 10-9; SATURDAY 10-6 



463-7787 





IS 



CARRIER, 
HELP! 

2 Reasons 

To Buy Carrier 
CooUng ]VOW! 




1. Savings 

Get the year's best prices 
plus high efflciency to cut your 
cooling costs. 

2. FREE 

With the purchase of a Carrier 
Air Conditioning or Heat 
Pump. We hand you a line with 
no stnngs attached — a Uniden 
Model EX3000 Cordless 
Telephone Free! 

Builders, developers not 
eligible. 

One per customer. 




Financing Now A vaUable 



SALES • SERVICE • REPAIRS 

SPECIALIZING IN HEAT PUMPS 
SHEET METAL WORK 
SERVICE CONTRACTS 



CALL TODAY FOR A FREE EVALUATION 

OF YOUR HOME 

Find out how much a Carrier heat pump can save you, 

547-4444 

AMPMOR ELECTRIC CORP. 

123 WayM Ave. • Great Bridge • Chesapeake 





Virginia Beach Sun. April 27. 1983 5 



Virsinia Beach Sun Hews 




King Neptune's Court 



Sea Sprite Wonuui At Healtk Education Building 



Sea Sprite Women 
Raise Over $1,200 

The Sea Sprite GretTo^ Ute King's Duughers 
recently held its Spring (Xllard Party-Luncheon- 
Bazaar at the Health Education Center, adjacent 
to Virginia Beach General (MSpital. 

As guests played cards, members of the Qrcle 
prepared and served lunch. The Bazaar tables 
displayed handmade items pertaining to the 
theme "What Time Is It? - ft's Fun in the Sun!," 
such as spring and sununer activities of garden- 
ing, aprois and towels for owk-outs, tote, tennis 
and beach bags and hats, baby sun-bonnets and 
sun dresses, and visors for golf and tetmis. 

Door prizes were awarded, as well as the 
grand raffle prize of a valuable desk clock and 
barometer which was donated by "Qockwcvks," 
a local clock shop. 

Mrs. Helen McDonald was Project Chairman 
with seventeen members participating in the 
fund-raiser which attracted over 200 guests for 
the day. 

Proceeds of over $1,200 will be donated to 
Virginia Beach General Hospital and other 
charitable organizationsin the community to be 
selected by Sea Sprite members at the May 
meeting. 




Continued from Pace 1 

maintains a "B" average and plans on continuing her 
studies beyond high school. 

"My participation in the 10th Annual Virginia Beach 
Neptune Festival would allow me to take part in 
activities outside of schod and learn more about a 
community in which I have lived for only three years." 

Judith A. lim, daughter of Rustico and Mgelica A. 
Lim, will represent Baysidc Mgh Schod. Judith 
maintains a perfect "A" average and is a recipient of 
the principal's list award, best Spanish student award, 
S(n>homore class president. Juniw righ dance chair- 
man, active member of the Student Council Association, 
forensic team, year book staff and tennis team. "Pride 
is a very important factor to the people of Virginia 
Beach, and 1 would expecially like to show my priae oi 



Smith, Gibson Announces 



Democratic Delegate 
Julie F. Smith, 8Sth 
District, has announced 
she seeks to retain her seat 
in the upcoming Novem- 
ber election. 



Joan W. Gibson, a 
Democrat and an attor- 
ney, will seek the seat of 
82nd Disirict incumbent 
W. R. Buster O'Brien. 



Harper Announces 



Sea Sprite members, front row, left to right are: 
Mrs. Barbara Chalkley and Mrs. Jane Foole. 
Back row, I - r, Mrs. Helen McDonald and Mrs. 
Flora Dunham. 



m 



^4$"^^^. 



SSK:_» ■ i" utiifuif'fi 



F. Gordon Harper, a 
businessman, has announ- 
ced he will seek the 
Republican nomination 
for the 85th District 



House Seat now held by 
Julie L. Smith, a Demo- 
crat. She has held the scat 
for one year. 



LymilKiv«n Of flf ri liittall«cl 

The Lynnhaven Colony Garden Club will hold 
its annual luncheon on Tuesday, May 3 at 10:30 
a.m. at the Ocean Island Restaurant. 

Virginia Beach City Councilwoman Reba S. 
McClanan will install the club's new of fleers: 

President. Mrs. E.W. Hansen; first vice 
President. Mrs. James E. Cochrane; second vice 
president. Mrs. B.L. Snead; recording secretary, 
Mrs. N.E. Murrell; corresponding secretary, Mrs. 
A.E. Grau; treasurer, Mrs. CD. Ralston; and 
historian and parliamentarian, Mrs. DeForrest 
Lilly. 



LOVEISNT 
UMITED ^ 
TO HOLIDAYS. 



Lefs Talk LongDistance. Any Day. 





both Bayside High Schod and Virginia Beach by being 
a Neptune ftincess, for there is much to be proud of for 
both." 

Allisoe H. Maclver, representing First Colonial High 
School, is the daughter of Cud D. Maclver. While 
maintaining a "B + " average, Allison is also a member 
uitne checrleading squad. German Gub, French Club, 
newspaper staff. Student Council Association represen- 
tative, a top 20 finisher in the State Math Contest, and 
drill team member. 

"I would be extremely proud to represent First 
Colonial High School as its Neptune Festival Princess. 
as I would finally be participating in an event that has 
become a very enjoyable part of my life in Virginia 
Beach." 

SharvB Ckrlstie Mendoca, daughter of Conrad and 
Gloria Mendoza, will represent Green Run High 
School. Christie's activities include secretary of the 
Student Council Association, the 1982-83 Madrigals, 
regicmal chorus member, 'debate team, 1982-83 
leadership wwkshop, 1982-83 National Fwensic 
League, and ski club member. Christie maintains a 
"B" average. 

"Becoming a member of King Neptune X's would be 
an honorable and rewarding experience. It would give 
me the opportunity to meet new people and form new 
friendships." 

Lisa Anderson, representing Kellam High School, is 
the daughter of Judith and Gerald Anderson. Lisa is a 
member of the drill team, French Qub, Junior 
achievement, Keyettes, Future Homemakers of Ame- 
rica, Junior Senate, and track team. "1 have a great 
deal of pride in Virginia Beach. Having lived in this 
area for five years, I would like to express my pride in 
the city by being a princess in such an interesting and 
fun-filled festival." 

Debra Tate, representing Kempsville High School, is 
the daughter of Robert and Dcmna Tate. Debi, whose 
excellent scholastic average has earned her the honor of 
being listed in "Who's Who in High School Students", 
is alsoa member of the French Qub. science club, Latin 
Oub and Keyettes Qub. 

"Being a member of the Neptune Festival Court fw 
1983 would be a great honor. It would allow me the 
chance to serve my community and to get involved." 

Caroline Shram, representing Princess Anne High 
School, is the daughter of Agnes and Swiny Shrum. 
Caroline is a member of the Marching Cavaliers, and 
concert band, gymnastics team, a powder puff player, 
Keyettes Qub, regional band and a National Writmg 
Contest participant. 

"I throughly enjoy working with students on service 
projects to better the community. I would appreciate 
the opportunity to work with other high school 
students, city officials, and festival coordinators to help 
make this year's festival a success." 

King Neptune remembers when there was no 
festival, no court, no princesses. Just a dream. Maybe 
to sane, a dream that seemed to be an unreal fantasy. 
Is it possible for dreams to come true? Just ask any of 
the eight princesses for their answer. 



Cross-Lites says: 

"fo grow in the Lord: Feed 
on the word, rest in the 
L ord, exercise yourself into 
Godliness'" 




Vbu don't turn off your 
love with the tree lights 
And birthdays aren't 
the only days to show 
affection. There are 
365 days in the year 
to love with. And 
to share with. Love 
isn't limited to holi- 
days. And neither 
is long distance. 





Green Run 
Invaded 

Storybook characters 
recently invaded Green 
Run Elementary School in 
observance of NationaL 
Library Week. Students in 
kindergarten through 
third grade went to school 
dressed as their favorite 
character from a book. 
They paraded throughout 
the school, led by Mother 
Goose, also known as Bet- 
ty Bridges, the school's 
librarian. 

Older students at the 
school designed buttons 
promoting books, 
reading, media, or 
libraries. These designs 
were made into badges by 
parent volunteers and 
were worn by students in 
observance of National 
Library Week. 



ua 


nucE 


SIZE 


mcE 


P15S/IM13 


S34 


nK/-mu 


$47 


P1H/IM13 


S39 


M15/75II14 


$41 


P17S/aM13 


S« 


ratt/751115 


$4a 


n»/t»» 


141 


ms/75ll15 


$49 


Pie/751114 


$43 


Wa/7WI15 


$53 


nu/7sai4 


$44 


W35/7MI1S 


$5« 



rta II M M U M M T 
SM MM tmut «prt M IttI 



m 



Avearof 
celedrations 



E7I-14 



nH IMtJI M a Ft T 




r ' ^ 




Norfolk 
Ai MUhao Sbopptai CMC 

461-9101 

sua Geo. 

485-5227 
OPf N: MOM-FW M, SAT M 



422llatealimM. 

420-372S 




Hwy. 



HmMk 
1^3-ndtwMKDr. 

587-9522 



€ 



?SI CoiitiMHtillUtphane 



^^E= = alBSyi^iiii 




MICHAEL F. 

FASANARO,JR. 

Attorney 
At Law 

461-6121 

5 Koger Exet utive Center 
SUITE 220 

Norfolk, Vi. 23502 



mm 



w 



■iv 



■■ 



■■I 



■■■ 



■HiiHHHHIii 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, April 27, 1983 



Virjinia Beach Sun Hews 







^^WW ^^^W- 






Aragona Seniors' Party 

IfTables Could Talk 



Virginia Loomit and DavM Fall stand beside a display depkUng what people can do in Virginia Beach when il 
rains. The concept is called "rain remedies." Virginia, 9, is the daughter of Commander and Mrs. Bob Loomis. 
David, 10, is the son of Mr. and Mn. Ed Fall. 

Students Devise Rain Remedies 

Jmics discusses such things as the ozone factor with 
her class. By explaining that first there is the world, 
then the nation, then the st^e. the city, the 
neighborhood, the home and then the student himself, 
the student comes to learn that what transpires in the 
home will ultimately affect the world. 



Continued from Page 1 

Beach Gty Public School System. The box of materials 
is made available, through the school administration's 
Department of Supervisory Services to each of the 
city's 43 elementary schools. Forty-one of them now 
participate in the program. All but eight of the schods 
have their own box, with many of them having 
additional boxes which were prepared by teachers. A 
recent in-service session was held at King's Orant 
Elementary School where teachers prepared their own 
personal boxes to use throughout the entire year. 
Unless teachers have their own box, they must return 
the box to the school system after the four-week 
program is completed. 

PenoaaluulClvic 

In additioi to the personal gains each student 
receives in studying his or her iidace of residence, the 
students also perform activities which bemfitthe entire 
city. 

In Barbara Jones' class the students work on manv 
things, including what is called "rain remedies," which 
is designed to formulate ideas oo what to do in Virginia 
Beach when it rains. When the children draw the sun 
with happy faces in it they are reminded that the sun 
isnt alone in having a smiley face, the clouds can also 
have one. 

Jones said the students sometimes have difficulty 
grasping the concept of a Council-Manager form of 
local government, but adds that they work hard to 
understand it. 

Jones sends home questionnaires to paroits, asking 
them questions and for ideas to include in the "Virginia 
Beach In a Box" program. 

"When anything comes up about Virginia Beach," 
Jones said, "I try to get them to be aware of it. I try to 
iget them to read the newspapers and communicate with 
their family and friends." Jones doesn't formaUy test 
the students on Virginia Beach issues, but doiss engage 
in a daily dialogue with them on community issues. 

Tlie information which is discussed in the classroom 
is not confined to the ctossroom. 

"We put up a syllabus and they malu their own 
notebooks based on what they have learned and send it 
out to people who don't live here," Jones said. 

The children make bode reports on seaioos of the 
textbooks which are in the box. The children are also 
encouraged to visit and enjoy Virginia Beach first 
before asking their parents to take them to Williams- 
burg or Richmond. 

"Hie children and their families don't get around 
enough to see the city and its highlights," Jones said. 
"They take it for granted. We've got a lot right here. 
Why not start here and then go to other places?" 

llie children are very enthusiastic about the 
program, and parents are very supportive d it and 
cooperate Mly. Jones tries to instill in the students a 
sense (rf concern and consideration f<x the city m whidi 
they live. 

"You should care about your city like you care about 
your home." she tells her class. 




SUPERIOR 
BUILDERS 



Specializing in Porch 

Enclosures & Florida Rooms 

also 

•Custom Room Addition 

•Room Addition Siwils 

•Batbroon Remodding •Garages 

•Vinyl & Aiaminnm Siding 

•Masonry Fireplue •Soiw & Glass Rooms 

•All Types Concrete Work •Termite Damage 

•Mt^tare Conta^ 

a VER 20 YRS. EXPERIENCE A STATE REG. 



FREE ESTIMATES 422-0500 



By Virginia Gayle, 

Aragona Garden Qub 

Among the honored 
guests at a recent senior 
citizens' fuuty at Aragona 
Community Recreation 
Center were State 
Delegate Glenn Mc- 
Clanan; his wife. Council- 
woman Reba MClanan; 
and City Manager, 
Thomas H. Muehlenbeck. 

The building, affection- 
ately known as the Rec 
Center, is plainly fun- 
ctional, but on Sumiay, 
with azaleas arranged 
down row after row of 
tables, "she" became 
something of a grand old 
girl, all dressed up for a 
party. 

Having sheltered so 
many activities over the 
years, "she," like the 
senior citizens for whom 
the party was given would 
have some tales to tell if 
the walls could speak. 

They could tell of 
Aragona Civic League; of 
Congressmen and other 
politically savvy who have 
come to speak there. Of 
Aragona-Pembroke Little 
League, and the young 
people involved. 

They could speak of 
Bingo nights, and scholar- 
ship drives. Of Officer 
George Ball and his 
Canine Corps companion. 



who held a large audience 
at rigid attention, fearful 
to scratch an itch. 

They could tell of Ike 
Snyder, now passed away, 
who served up music with 
hot meals at countless 
senior citizens' parties 
over the years. 

Meals for the senior 
citizens events are 
provided by Aragona 
Community Recreation 
Center, and prepared by a 
dedicated cadre of 
A.C.R.C. workers, who 
go unsung, but are there 
when the need arises. 
These are people whose 
dedication has sometimes 
had them up late on pre- 
party nights, weaving 
o-ape paper streamers into 
something of cabaret at- 
mosphere. Who, on party 
days, arrive early to cook, 
and remain late to serve, 
their approximately two- 
hundr^ honors guests. 

the six-person band for 
Sunday's event was 
provided by Norfolk 
Musicians' Assoc., Local 
#125. 

Floral arrangements 
were provided by 
Aragona Garden Club. 
The twice-yearly gala, 
which requires dressing up 
Aragona's "grand old 
girl," couldn't be in more 
capable hands. 



"When anything comes up about 
Virginia Beach, I try to get them to be 
aware of it. I try to get them to read the 

newspapers and communicate with their CavaUei HOStS FaTmCrS 
family and friends . . . we put up a 
syllabus and they make their own note- 
books based on what they have learned 
and send it out to people who don 't live 
here." - Fourth Grade Teacher Bar- 
bara Jones 



"Your obligation is to yourself and to other pec^le," 
she tells her students. "It's basically going back to the 
Golden Rule." Jones addresses ecdogy, preservaticm , 
conservation. For example, in 30 minutes cme day she 
and her class picked up trash armind the schod and 
finished with 30 pounds of garbage. In addition, she 
teaches traffic, bike and classroom safety, and 
recycling. 

Jones is very pleased with the results a! the 
"Virginia Beach In A B<»" program and hopes to 
someday see it expanded to the junior and high schocd 
level. 

Each year the program is evaluated and updated. 
Jones said she plans, after this year's evaluation, to ask 
the children if they would enjoy learning more 
extensively about their city in the ftiture. Perhaps, she 
suggests, a one-semester elective course in the upper 
grades could be considered. 

Jones has two children, both of whom are studying 
economics and business, and were First Qdonial Mgh 
Schod honor graduates. Mark is a senio- at 
Hampden-Sydney Cdlege, Hampden-Sydney, VA., 
and was very active in athletics at First Colonial. 
Jennifer, a soptiomore at Mary Baldwin Coliege. 
Staunton, VA., was a First Colonial cheerleader. 



Over 250 Farmers 
Home Administration 
(FmHA) county, district 
and state office personnel 
from Virginia will convene 
at the Cavalier Hotel in 
Virginia Beach on Thur- 
sday and Friday, April 28 
and 29 for the agency's 
biennial state meeting. 

State Director, Roie M. 
Godsey, who administers 
FmHA farm,housing and 
community programs in 
Virginia, announced the 
FmHA national Ad- 
ministrator, Charles W. 
jShuman will be the 
'keynote speaker at the 
banquet Thursday 
evening. 

Godsey said. "The 
meeting basically will be a 
training session for all 
employees. It will give 
them an opportunity to 
discuss various aspects of 
FmHA credit programs 
with state and national of- 
ficials. Mr. Shuman is 
coming from Washington. 
D.C. and will be here for 
most of the meeting to ex- 
change views and infor- 
mation with the entire 
staff. He is expected to 
update the staff on the 



impact in Virginia of the 
S600 million national 
allocation in the emergen- 
cy jobs bill (PL 98-8) for 
water and waste disposal 
loans and grants to be 
administered \>y FmHA." 

There are 51 FmHA 
county offices' and seven 
district offices in Virginia 
which are administered by 
Godsey, who is headquar- 
tered in the FmHA State 
Office in Richmond. 
During the last fiscal year. 
FmHA invested over $117 
million in Virginia for 
more than 3.300 famr. 
housing and waste 
disposal loans and grants 
to be administiered by 
FmHA." 

FmHA is the credit 
agency of the U.S. Depar- 
tment of Agriculture. It is 
known as a "last resort 
lender" because most ap- 
plicants must show that 
they cannot qualify for a 
loan from a private 
market lending in- 
stitution. Loans by the 
agency are fully secured 
and borrowers are 
required to repay the 
loans, plus internt to the 
U.S. Government. 



^% * -^ 


^Ittf;^ ^^mi^ 


• ^ '^^ 


. %'V. " _ J 


■ '^-}i IS 


- i^^ 




^^^Hlm 


^.t.. 


•^K 




M 




^.^^^StSM 




i^Hl 








•■ '■ m 



PriTCCss Anne Woman's Qub members, left to 
right, are: Mrs. Ldand L. BaMey and Mrs. Ar- 
thur L. RkbardaoB. 

P.A. Women Gross $15,000 

Continuing it's ongoing program of charitable 
contributions, of providing scholarships, and of 
contributions to ccwnmunity services, the GFWC 
Princess Anne Woman's Club of Virginia Beach 
announced the distribution of funds at a recent 
meeting. The club grossed more than $15,000 at its 
annual antiques show held last October. 

The funds were distributed as follows: 
$3,933.43 club charities and community services; 
$2,000, scholarships: $2,200, Virginia Beach 
Rescue Squads; $1,000, Hope Haven Building 
Fund; $400, Camp Easter Seal East; $500, Con- 
tact; $1,000, American Cancer Society; $500, 
Meals on Wheek; $770, HoUday House; $250, 
Sun Whellers; $500, Virginia Beach Maritime 
Museum; $500, Beach House; $1,000, Hospice; 
and $1,180.30, Miscellaneous Philanthropic Ser- 
vices. 

Over $125,000 has been made and allocated to 
various charities, scholarships and community 
services since the inception of the antiques show. 
It is the intent of the Princess Anne Woman's 
Club to continue this program. 



MmOffYi 

Andrew J. Mooney has been named Notre 
Dame Man of the Year by the Notre Dame Club 
of Soustheastern Virginia during the Club's an- 
nual "Universal Night" dinner held recently at the 
Fort Story Officer's Chib. 

Mooney, owner of Tidewater's Mooney 's Spor- 
ting Goods Stores, was one of the Club's original 
founders. A Rutgers University Business graduate 
with an intense and lifelong interest in Notre 
Dame, Mooney initiated and organized over a 
dozen successful events as the Club's social chair- 
man during the Club's brief two-year history. 
Proceeds from these activities have been con- 
tributed to the Tidewater Notre Dame Scholarship 
Fund. 



COL. JOSEPH (JOE) EXUM - AUCTIONEER 



JOE EXUM AUCTION CO. 

550 FIRST COLONIAL RD. 
VA BEACH, V4 23451 




Phone 422-6684 
422-4949 



AUCTIONS - APPRAISALS 
SALES - PROMOTIONS 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



20 words or less - $4.40. Additional words - 22« each. 
Please print clearly using one word per box. 




OUNCE O GOLD 










































4.40 


4.62 


4.84 


5.06 


* 

5.ffl 


5.50 


5.72 


5.94 


6.16 


6.38 


6.60 



^ 



Please run ad for 

Mall to: 

Byerly Publications 

P.O. BOX 1527 

Chesapeake, va. 23320 



Issues, or until cancelled ( K 
Cost of single ad $ 



Number times to run 
Amount enclosed $ _ 



Name 

Address 
dtv 



.s^e_ 



^ip- 



Your telephone number 

AU ClASSIF«0 AOS RUN W THf CHESAPEAICE P(»T AND THE VWONIA BfACH SUN 

For help witli your classified ad. please caU 547-4571. 





POSITIVELY ^v 

the 

Lowest Diamond Prices 

in Town 

Shop & Compare. We did and this is what we found. 

Va CT. diamond ENGAGEMENT RING 

OUR PRICE $^'7C00 Ol^ PRICE i 

Their Prices *''^ ' 

Kays »595»* 

Zal^ »560»' 

D.P.Pauls M99»' 

Gordon's !499»» 

J.B. Robinson »395»» 

Otttr Ah ■!» akiiUlt, tar talMrMHI prieci. 

OVNCE 'O GOLD 

• GOLD miDBY WEIGHT • CUSTOM WORK A VAILABLE 

• COMPLETE REPAIR SERVICE • IS LOCALLY OWNED 

GREENBRIER MALL 420-3932 
UPPER LEVEL 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 27, 1983 7 



yir9inia Beach City Council ByL««cihiii 




Beach Council Actions 




Nancy A. Creech 
Al-Lartc 



Bwb«aM.Heiriey Itarold Hctochobt r H. Jick J«iUii«» 

P«a|o Al-Ur«* Lyii«li««« 



LoMb R. Jonn 
tayiMc 



Who says dogs and cats don't get along. It's all in how they are 
raised. 

The same is true in our emerging relationships with one 
another. Given the right influences in the early years we learn respect 
and tolerance, friendliness and forgiveness. 

The Church is esproially important in this aspect of raising a 
family. As part of his religious education a child learns that his 
telationship with others is a practical expression of his relationship 
with God. The youngster's reverence and growing faith begin to be 
reflected in his treatment of others at home, at school and in his 
community. 

This vital area of every child's growth depends on his parents 
awareness of his spiritual needs. Next week— every week— provide 
for your youngster's religious education. Your place of worship is 
eager to h^a ''^ fti?«^ -*:*:? ^ - ' 



CopyrlgM 19B3 K«Mw AdvwtWng Swvim 
•nd WMiinw N««M|W()w FMrMM SyndicaM. Inc 
P. 0. Box 8024, CtiwKMiMvM*, Va. 22906 



Soripiww sMcM by The Ainwicw Hbto SoeMy 

Sunday Monday Tuesday 



DeuteroTomy 
6:1-25 



,hshua 
24:1-28 



Ephesians 
5:1-20 



Wednesday 

Ephesians 

5:21-33 



Thursday 

Ephesians 

6:1-4 



Friday 

Titus 

2:1-15 



Saturday 

I Peter 

3:1-7 



■+■ Open Door (m)340-i44i 
■ '■chapel 

31T7 V«. Be«h Bhd., V.. Be«li. V... 23452 

SUNDAY TUESDAY 

Saai^gchMl WSAM MMcSlirfy IMOAM 

WonUpScnrlcf *MIM 

....l«-JtAM WEDNESDAY 

p^yKScrrkc i-MV** H«*.w«k Scnrfce . . . . 7 Jt PM 



Announcements- 



Spring Banquet, May 13. 1983, 6:30 
P.M., Fellowship Hall, Indian River Bap- 
tist Church, 1600 Laurel Avenue, 
Chesapeake, VA. Special Entertainment. 
Catered by Giant. Call the Church Office 
for reservations - 424-5700. 



CALVARY 

ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

4925 Providence Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Leonard Campbell, Pastor 

495-1004 

Youth L.I.F.E. Saturday, 7 P.M. 



Cda. I^oad M.mU^ of QJ 




tlCCCCMRNOAO 

OMATIMOeS 

CHESAKAKE. vmetNU Z33M 

TtLEMOM S47«S1 or MT »» 



i»mtmC^me) IMtaja. 

Sarvfce ....TsMp.*. 
V«H|Ai^li..7-Jtp.& 




Pastor: Rev. John R. Carraway 
Phone 424-2276 






W. H. KilcUa, ill 
VirlialaiicMli 



RctaS.McClMU 
PriaccH Amm 



J. Henry McCoy, Jr. 
MmiNviUr 



Mtytn Obcrmlorf 
Al-Ur|t 




MmmMim to nofWMio^ 
WTMLfMrnYGimmm 

Phate W. MeSmdn, Jr, Pmtor 
^4^700 



Kings Grant Baptist Chnrch 

873 Little Neck Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

SUNDAY 

.M*«.a. WEDNI5DAV 

ufeMp.i 



..Mta.1 

.IM«u 



!*• 



.tlMt-m. CaMin. 

..IMfM. P i «y ti Sa»h «... 

Jerry Holcomb, Pastor 
340-0902 



.fc3tp.i 



Meeting Date: April 25, 19S3. AM members prcscal. 
Budget Workshop 3 p.m. 

Rnwtrar Marlene Hager presents budget; announces old 
voting machines sold, for $40,000; another $4,000 may be for- 
thcoming from selhng old supplies. 

Public Health Director Dr. E. M. Sjolund presents budget; 
announces $52,000 is needed from the city to continue dental 
trailer for low income children and the elderly. 

Erosion budget maintains same level of service. 

Mosquito Control Districts budgets increased by $70,000. 

Arts and Hum-niiies Commission budget is $84,200. down 
from $160,000 department request. Discussion o\er allocation 
to the Virginia Orchestra Group and the Virginia Beach Pops 
Orchestra. 

Consideration given making contributions to organizations 
and agencies a separate category. City Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbcck points out that Mosquito Control {$I,19J,489) . 
and the Heahh Department ($831,628), receive the largest 
"contributions" in the $2.71 1.056 proposed for (;oniributions. 

Councilman Jack Jennings Jr. proposes six cent tax rate cut; 
he says that Council has little or nothing to do with proposed 
annual budget and "that's why the spending and taxes go up 
year after year." 
Council members give views on budget . 

if Informal Session 5:30p.ni. 

Offfohor* Drilliiig 

Councilwoman Reba McOanan commends State Attorney 
General for getting involved in fight against offshore drilUng; 
express hope that Bayville Manor house preservation ares sets 
an example. ' _^ , 

PoH«r Pro^rty ■•««il»« 

Harold E. Johnson, past presidem of First Colonial Civic 
League, on behalf of First Colonial and Uurel Manor Civic 
Leagues, oppose water and sewer installatioi. on Lindsley 
Drive which wouid require ihem to hook up. The Leagues 
areed to re^oning of the property by R. C. Moore with he 
understanding the City Council would not require 'ns^J""""" 
of the lines. The matter was referred to the staff for con- 
sultation with the residents. 



City Council instructs Muehlenbeck to place the handgun 
ordinance on a future agenda. Chief Charles Wall explains the 
ordinance has been on the books, but is actually being 
liberi^ized. 

latMlM rlmiiKial StotMiMtt 

Continued until next Monday. 

dP Qvarff«riy fttafwt ■•poH 

Continued until next Monday. 

UmPatmH 

Request of Francis E. Pritchard Jr. to have application for 
conditional use permit expedited not necessary because Pun- 
ning Commission has moved hearing up to May. 



■•VI 

Members question the indiscriminate approval of Industnal 
Development Revenue Bonds. 

if Executive Session 640 p.m. 
if Formal Session tas p.m. 



PresentaUon of resolution commwnotaiing dty's 20th an- 
niversary by Steve Gavora , president of Tidewater Com 

T«I^1S of .he week of April 24-30 « the week of 
cete^S in commemoration of the city's 20.h birthday ^ 
ofApril 30 as City Hall Day when all citizens are invited to par- 
ticipate from I0a.m.to4p.m^ .... 

proclamation of April 24 through April 30 as Child Abuse 
and Nealect Prevention Week. 

Proda^ation of the month of May as Drug Abuse Preven- 

'^Sl.'on in recogmtion of RoUnd Edgar Dorer. who in 
J966 conceived the idea of Mount Trashmore. Born m E^ 
Orange. N.J.. Rorer. an engineer, is a graduate of Rutgers 
University. 



Resolution authorizing city "^'^'''^'X^tTX 
regarding the use of property owned by W^ B. Meredith II ^ 
tSu.S Navy parachuting team, the Shooimg Stars. Ap- 
proved 11-0. 



• Consent Agenda 

_ , .t :. n.^^niiinf< in F F. BricI 



.Resolution in Recognition to E. E. Brickell. Ed.D: Virginia 
Beach's First Citizen 1W2. Approved ll-O. 
^Rewlutioos approving Industrial Developmen. Revenue 

"*tedution of City Council approving the issuance of 1»- 
duS iTelopmJ Reven-e Bond to Herbert E. and Manon 
A. Wittersheim ($300,000). Approved II-O. 

Resolution of City Council approving the «««^ "l^ 
dusirial Development Revenue Bond to J^k Rabbi. SeW- 
StOTMe/Shore Drive ($2,250,000) Approved 11-0. 

R^iioo of City Council approving the »»««« "fj^ 
d«S^Develop»e«t Revenue *«* ««J^ ,?^ ^- 

^^rtL of City Council approviiw the issuwce of ta- 
a,;SXlop.»cn. Revenue Bond for the ^^otF^ 
iiSomce Building Associates, a General Partnership 

'^SSc^'^TS C--. approving the is.u«« of U,- 
rtSJ^el^* Rcvem« Bond to Satelli.e Sy«««, Cor- 
pcntion ($550,000). Approved U-0. 



Resolution of City Council approving .he issuance of In- 
dustrial Development Revenue Bond to W and Z, a Virrnia 
General Partnership ($175,000). Approved 1 1-09. 

Resolution of City Council approving the issuance of in- 
dustrial Development Revenue Bonds for the benefitof A 
Kemp Rowe (Rowe Corporate Center V Facility) ($5,000,000) 
Approv'ed U-0. -:-_^:^ , r i„ 

Resolution of City Council approving the issuance of In- 
dustrial Development Revenue Bonds for the »>e«ien. ofA 
Kemp Rowe (Rowe Corporate Center IV f aciUiy) ($5,000,000). 
Approved 11-0. , . „r I- 

Resolution of City Council approving the issuance of In- 
dustrial Development Revenue Bonds for the bettefiiof A. 
Kemp Rowe (Rowe Corporate Center lIl.Facihty) ($5,000,000) 

Approved 11-0. 

Resolution of City Council approving the i»uance of In- 
dustrial Development Revenue Bonds to Rose Hall Associates 
($400,000). Approved 1 1-0. 
" Resolution of City Council approving ihe issuance of In- 
dustrial Development Revenue Bonds to Ramon W. Breeden, 
Jr., and B. Bruce Taylor ($300,000). Approved 11-0 

Ordinance to Amend and Rcotdain Section 21-75 of the 
Code of the City of Virginia Beach. Virginia, pertaining to 
local vehicle license uxes. Approved 1 1 -0. 

Ordinance, on second reading, to increase estimate revenues 
and transfer Capital Project funds for street improvements to 
the l00blockof68thSireet. Approved II-O. 

Ordinance to Transfer funds of $289,a)0 within the Depar- 
tment of Social Services for the State and Local 
HospiUlizatidn Program. Approved 1 l-O. 

Ordinance Authorizing the City Manager to Execute a Ueea 
of Dedication and Vacation between Virgima Beach Resort 
Conference Hotel and the City of Virginia Beach. Approved 

Low bid to Williams Corporation of Virginia, in the amount 
of $162 528.32 for the Cedar Hill Canal - PhaK II Projec (CIP 
z-yior ana. authorize the Ci.y Manager to enter into the 
necessary agreements for the implementation of this project. 
Approved 11-0. 



if Planning Items 



Apriication of Barry Thomas Watts and Kalhy Diane Watts 
for a closure of a portion of Alabama Avenue, (formerly 
known as 29th Street), (Princess Anne Borough). Council ap^ 
Moved on October 25, 1982, but applicant hat not met con 
ditions of which approval was based. Utter from the City 
Manager transmits the fact that the applicant has mwJe 
progress toward meeting the requirements. It wiU be necosary 
for Council to deny this closure or gram an exifwon of tiine 
sufficient to complete the requirements. Deferred 30 days 11-0. 
Application of Delia Lee Barton for a variance to Section 
4 4(b) of the Subdivision Ordinance which requires lot dimen- 
sions to conform to the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance. 
The applicant wishes to subdivide a 14,529.9-square foot parcel 
into iwo lots, one of which will be a "fUg lot" configuration^ 
Proposed Lot A will total 9,520.31 square feel, while proposed 
Lot B will total 5,000.59 square feet. This subdivision could 
not be approved administratively since the potential exists that 
additional "flag lots" could be created in Ihe area. Letter from 
the City Manager transmits the recommendation of the Plan- 
ning Commission for denial. Deferred three weeks 11-0. 

Application of Roy G. Farless and Richard W. Setzer for a 
variance to Section 4.4(b) of the Subdivision Ordinance which 
requires that lot dimensions conform to the Comprehensive 
Ordinance. They wish to subdivide a 31,688-square fool (.727 
aae) parcel located on the north of Scott Bend Une, 200 feet 
west of Ciarcia Drive (Lynnhaven Borough) into two lots, one 
toulling 17,822 square feel (Parcel B-2-A) and the other 
totalling 13.800 square feet (Parcel B-2-B). Both tots would be 
in a "nag lot" configuration . This subdivision could not be 
approved administratively since the potential exists that ad- 
ditional -nag lots" couW be created in the area. Utl« from 
the City Manager iransmiii the recommendation of the Plan- 
ning commission for denial Denied II-O. 

Application of Mrs. J. James Davis for a variance to Section 
4 4(b) of the Subdivision Ordinance which requires that lot 
dimensions conform to the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance. 
She wishes to subdivide a 1 .39-acre parcel located at the north- 
west comer of Pinewood Road and Holladay Point into two 
parceU. one totaUing 31,125.57 square feet (.714 Kre-Lot 22- 
A) and the other toulling 29.637.73 square feet (.68 acre - Lot 
22-B) (Virginia Beach Borough). Letter from the City Manager 
transmits the recommendation of the Planning Commission 
for approval. Deferrwl until May 16 1 1-0. u ^ .u 

AppLtion of the Virpnia Beach Racquet Club North 
Associates for a conditional use pe.mii lor renovation and ex 
MUBion of existing recreational facilities to include locker 
rooms and a grill on a 9.379-acre parcel located alcmg the east 
side of Thomas Bishop Lane, north of Great Neck Road (Lsm- 
nhaven Bort^). Letter from the City Manager transmits the 
reccmuitendation of the Planning commission for approval. 
An>roved 7-4. Henley. Kitchin, McOanan. Oberndorf dissen- 

"tpplication of Peterson Associates.' Inc. for a change of 
K,ning from R-8 Residential District to A-l Apartment District 
on a 9 9(»-aae parcel; and a change of zoning from B 2 Corn- 
munity Business District to A-l Aj»nment District «>"»*■ 5. 
acre wrcel. This property is located along Ihe west side of 
Kempsville Road, south of Indian River Road <*-«"«»;""« 
B<^ough) (This item was deferred for one week on April 18. 
IW3) Letter from the City Manager transmits the recomnten- 
datiM of the Planning coramissioB for approval. Apprcwred 6- 
5. He*chober. Henley, Kiichin. McClanan. Oberndorf dissen 

•"^-Barton of Robert W. WadddL M.D.. Trustee of 
VtSlleach Orthopedic Assoctaies. Inc.. Employee Profi 
Shari«| Plan, for a change of umm, fr«« R"' ««f«»"«^ 
Dtatrict to O-l Office DistrKi on a four acre parcel located 
,k»g the south side of Old Donation Parkway, west of Firs. 
Colonial RMd (Lynnhaven Borough). Utter from the City 
Manner inmmH% the recommendaiioB of the Planmiw 
^^^IZL^ f„ denial Approve 8 3. HCTtey. McClanan, 
Oberndorf disKnting. 

SeeCOUhKTIL.P^eelO 



"^^■ppi 



mmm 



■■ 



■■■■^■■■iiH 



8 Virginia Beach Sun, April 27, 1983 



Yirsinia Beach Sun Hews 



Beach Student VICA Winners named 



The VICA State 
Leadership Conference 
was recently held io 
Roanoke with a number 
of Virginia Beach Vo- 
Tech students as winners. 



Brian Banks won Ist 
place in Cominerciai Art; 
James Coughlin won 1st 
place in Plumbing; Ken- 
neth Ethertdge won 
1st place in Diesel 



Mechanics; David Lawson 
won 1st place in Diesel 
Mechanics (Post- 
Graduaie category); Susan 
Marsh won Ist place in 
Cosmetology; Sean Wise 




Beacher 

Meets 

Queen 



Lorene Stokes, Azalea Queen Jokes with Naval 
Air Rework Facility Quality Assorancc SpcdalisI 
Tommy Blrdgcs, a Vli^inia Beach resident, during 
her visit (o the industrial facility April 20. Bridges 
was on hand to guide the Queen on lour of the test 
tlUf^vft of fiiARF during her recent visit. 



won 3rd place in Machine 
Drafting and D«wb 
Nation earned a Leader* 
ship Certificate. In ad- 
dition, Herbert Overton 
was elected President of 
VICA District One. 

The 1st place Sute win- 
ners will represent Vir- 
ginia at the National 
VICA Leadership Con- 
ference in Kentucky in 
June. 

Vocational Industrial 
Clubs of America (VICA) 
is a national organization 
for trade, industrial, and 
technical education 
students. Its 27S.OOO 
members are in 13,000 
clubs in the SO statu and 
territorial associations. 

LItlcr Awards 



Founders 

Continued from Pate 1 

Dusch, mayor; Edward T. 
Caton, HI; W. Hugh Kit- 
chin, Jr.; John W. Mc- 
Combs; and L. Stanley 
Hodges. 

Virginia Beach City 
Council, 1963: Lawrence 



The school also had 
winners In the Virginia 
Beach Clean Community 
Commission contests with 
the theme: "Wave Good- 
bye to Litter." 

In the sculpture contest, 
Richard Johnson won Ist 
^iix, Pam Johnson 2nd 
idace, Debbie Smith 3rd 
place, with Honorable 
Mentions going to Tina 
Schawschmidt and Ken 
Jduison. 

In the poster collage 
contest, Roy Duncan won 
1st plaix, Audra Powell 
won 2nd place, Judy Hef- 
fington 3rd place and Eric 
Patterson was awarded 
Honorable Mention. 

All of the students are 
in the Vo-Tech Commer- 
cial Arts class under the 
instruction of Judith 
Doyle. 




E. Marshall (replaced 
Carroll G.Clough). 

L^lators: Senator E. 
Aimer Ames, Jr.; an 
Judge Pmsley B. White. 

Administrators: Richard 
J. Webbon; W. Russell 
Hatchett; and Judge 
George W. Vakos. 



Livestock 
Show Set 

Angela Mulltns 
helps her daughter, 
Laura, bathe her 
lamb. Champ 



Photo By Joah Ashley 
I Four-H'ers from Virginia Beach and 

Chesapeake will compete in the 37th Annual 

Virginia Beach/Chesapeake 4-H Junior Livestock 
* Show and Sale on Friday, May 6. This event will 
' take place at Princess Anne Stables, located olf 
' London Bridge Road in Virginia Beach. The show 
•line up will include classes of market steers, 

market hogs, breeding ewes and market lambs. 
There will be a sale/auction of all market 

animals - excluding hogs - following the show at 7 

p.m. Dinner will be serv«l at 5:30 p.m. 
For additional information contact either the 
, Virginia Beach 4-H Office at 427-4617 or the 

Chesapeake 4-H Office at 547-6444. 



NATIONAL SECRET ARIES DAY 



These Outstanding Secretaries Have Been Recognized By 
Their Respective Employers As A Tribute To National Secretaries Pay 








ftuiiani Meade 

iSr. Anwarul Islam 

1856 Colonial Med. Ct. 

Va. Beach, Va. 

6 Months 









• m 


1*2 


1 




C^nny Cooper 

Denhy P. Dobbins 

1324N.BattlefM(lBlvtf. 
Cimapcake 

SViVears 


f '-' ~^9IH 


Wf 


i 


^ 




. ' JllO^IB i 'fl 



DebraWhitehome 

Home Federal 

Savings and Loan 

700 Boush street 

Norfolk, Va. 

2 Years 




® 



AYearof 
Celetxations 




Elizflheth Lorda 

H. K. Reveley.Jr. 

1324 N. Battlefield Blvd. 

Chesapeake 

lYear 




Jean James 

Bray&Whitehunt 

101 MLPkasaat Road 

Chesapeake 

11 Years 




Betty Weteter 

Clyburn Insorance 

Agency 

5637-C PrtaKCM Awe Rd. 

Vk^^iyaBcack 

25 Yean 




Betty Clark 

Century 21 Metro 

1341 S. MUllary Hw;. 

Chesapeake 

2 Years 




LenoieLafvson 

Udewalcr Realty 

AffiociatM, Inc. 

404S.ParttemeatDr. 

VIrgiida Beach, Va. 

IWeek 




Shirley Pierce 

Dr. Lairy Legum 

113 Costal Way 

Chenpeake 

lYear 




Carol Holmas 

Chesapeake Pmt 

1024 N. Battlefield Blvd. 

Chesapnke 

2Moitfta. 



DarieneComstock 
ChesqwakePo^ 

1024 N.BatlleflM Blvd. 

CtesapealM 

tMeaths 




Anna Eballar 

Goodman Segar 

Hogan 

Gr^t Bridge 

Sh^^agCeater 

lOMoiMlH 




Ann Smith 

Eagle Realty 

5241PriM«ssAneRd. 

Va. Beach, Va. 

2Mwiths 




Dr.PatfRioMiilii 

Dr.ChwIca^M^M 

5«aal«McUJfc«. 



SMYem 




Georgia Bowden 

Ricardo Realty 

3SIJ^Mtowa 

CheMpcake 



heOeBomeisen 

Pyle Realty 

VirgliriB Beach, Va. 
4Moirtto 



SheUa Absher 

Dr. Heary Pattenoa 
inCoHtalWay 



3Y( 







BererlyLocM 

Dr. David OM^ 


^H^^^H* 1 




124S.&itlMeMHv«. 

ChesagwAf 

16 Yn. 


W \ 


'i ^^ 







Brenda Minnix 

1 Years 

Debbie Owens 

a Years 
Altart Solomoi, D.D.b. 
AIM G. Forbes, D.D.S. 
U24BMtlelieida««^N. 



«■■■ 



■HV 



■■■ 



■■ 



Virginia Beach Sun. April 27, 1983 9 



Virsinia Beach Sun News 

New Municipal Art Show Set 



Seventy-nine year dd 
Mary Ellen Unglois 
paints scenes from her 



childhood memories eight 
hours a day from the 
kitchen corner of her 28- 



USE THIS FORM 
TOSU^CRIBETO 

THE VIRGINIA lEACH SUN 
138 ROSEMONT ROAD 

Virginia Beach/Va.» 23452 



-1 



547-4571 



NAME___ 
ADDRESS. 

CITY 

STATE 

ZIP 



PHONE. 



I WITHIN TIDEWATER AREA 

DOne year $9.00 

DTwo years $15.00 

Only 17( An issue! 



ALL OTHER AREA 

DOne year $1 1 .00 
DTwo years $17.00 

PLEASE CHECK HERE if this is 
a new subscription. D 
PLEASE CHECK HERE if you 
are now receiving THE VIRGINIA 
BEACH SUN and afe renewing 
your subscription. □ 



foot travel trailer to make 
old things new again, 
again. 

Langlois is the featured 
artists in the May Munici- 
pal Center Art Show 
sponsored by the Virginia 
Beach Arts Center. The 
monthly show is located in 
the second floor corridor 
erf' the Qty Adnunistration 
Buildmg at Courthouse 
RcMd and Northland 
Drive. 

Tbe 14 ml paintings in 
the exhibit depict the 
early life of the artist cm 
her fomily's homestead 
farm in Alberta. Canada 
70 years ago. Her memo- 
ries have been sifted 
through remembrances of 
a lifetime that includes a 
S2-year marriage to her 
now deceased husband, a 
40-year career as a beau- 
tician and a painting 
career that began at age 
SS. Yet to Langlois, the 
details are clearer in her 
mind than last montn's 
storm. 

As a child, she lived the 
pioneer life. Bom in 1904 
to English immigrants, 
Langkus' family took up 
the homestead farm when 
she was nine. The memo- 
ries of her and six sisters 
working the land and 
hunting for food offer her 
sdace today. 

"lean be wcMried about 
something and will stop it 
all when I paint; I can 
paint for hours and not get 
tired. I'm going to paint a 
few more scenes from my 
childhood if I live that 
long," said Langlois. 

The life may seem 
IcMiely, but it is a way for 
her to recreate the experi- 
ences of her youth for a 
43-year old daughter and 
a 46-year old son. It is a 
way fw her to make old 
things new again - an 
apportunity to share her 
happy adventure with 
everyone. 



The Municipal Center 
Show is on view Monday 
through Friday between 
the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 
p.m. The show is free and 
open to the public. 





Todd 



New 
CBN 
Dean 

Teryl VV. 1 odd, director 
of recruitment and 
assistant campus minister 
at CBN University, has 
been appointed dean of 
students and camiius 
ministries. The announce 
ment was made by Dr. 
Richard F. Cottier, 
university president. 

He replaces Dr. David 
Gyertson, who left J to 
become vice president for 
Seminary advancemefti 
and professor of Christiaiti 
leadership at Asbury 
Theological Seminary In 
Wilmore, Ky. 



Pavilion's The Best 

"Of all the shows we do, the Virginia 
Beach Pavilion is the most beautiful 
building in which we work; hands down," 
said Linda Roth, public relations director, 
Computers Expositions, Inc., based in 
Annapolis, MD. 

The Second Annual Virginia/Carolinas 
Computer Show and Office Exposition 
was recently held at the Pavilion, with at- 



Computer show visitors listen to remarks made 
by a spokesman from The Memory Bank, Virginia 
Beach. 

tendance for the fonr-day event set at 
about 20,000. Last year's attendance was 
14,916. Exhibitors last year numbered 78; 
this year, 97. 

The computer show is also presented in 
Baltimore, D.C., and Atlanta. Next 
year's show In Virginia Beach will be held 
May 3 through 6. 



Producers 
Sell Out 



Natioiial recording 
artist* The Producers 
recently performed to 
a paired house at the 
Beach Theatre 





SALE 

[^^^ 

ColonW Scries 

CRIBS 

rcgulariy 139.95 

NOW »114.95 

(your choice; pine 

maple or white finish) 

FREELAYAWAY 

Baby Bazaar "'"■Q"'""""'""''"" 

lS6SLywdMveaPkwy. 
Parkway ^opiring Center 
Mo«..Fri.l(>^; Sat 10-5 > 

467-5032 





Baby Week is From April 23 - May 7 



Everything's 
Lookin'Up! 

Please Patronize 
These Fine Merchants. 



/" Little Things 

mean a lot 
Children and Infant Gifts 

10% Off 



Everything 

In 

Stock 

Located In Children's Village 

Near T.J. Maxx*Londoa Brid^ Area 


Mon -Sat 
10-5 

486-3700 




HOP TO IT/ 



(puntru Dofj 

EnroU now fox 

our Summer 

|voff«n 



^ 1305 WINDMILL 
i POINT C»ES. AT Tlie 

, pdnte" in Oeen Run 
427-1S91 




llOOIudiaB 

LAKES BLVD. 

KempsvUle Area 
467-8S35 




20% off on all Baby Clothes and 
Gift Items. 



30% off Covert-a-bag 
Diaper Bag. 



10% off all Spring Clothing 



f^) 




• Lomloa Fog 
•HerMaJcfty 

• Koy^Way 

•OP 

• P^FIatfcn 

• LMlkWwM 

CM ■ Infaate to 14 • B^i • i^nli to 7 

Horn Moiid^ -SMviQr M4 
Al ChUmi's Viy«Lo«*»a Bridfe 



niuwK 



SfltllU 



Babylady of Kempsville 

specializing 



in 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



J L 



New & Used Furniture 

Baby Accessories 

&Toys 



will buy any baby lt«i» 
5716 Princess Anae Rd. 

(M«Newl»w«Bi.EaM) 

Va. Beach, V« 
499-5700 

WItk the coapoB reeri^e 
yea 



ivqaMn^ 



■HMVI 



mm 



mmm 



10 Virginia Beach Sun, April 27. 1983 



Council Discusses Lowering Real Estate Tax 



ByL^Cahill 
Sun Council Reporter 

A move by Virginia 
Beach City Councilman H. 
Jack Jennings Jr. to 
reduce the real estate tax 
rate by six cents drew 
tittle support Monday 
evening as Council exiin- 
ined the budget at its fifth 
works hq). 

Jennings panted out 
that with that decrease in 
the rate, the citizens stiU 
will be paying an eight 
percent increase in taxes 
because of the increase in 
assessments. 

With apparent annoy- 
ance at Council's role, or 
lack of one, in preparing 
the budget. Jennings 
charged that "Council in 
reality has little or nothing 
to do with the prcqxised 
annual budget, lihat's 
why spending and taxes 
goes up year alter year." 
He said the budget is the 
handiwork of the staff. He 
said he is not critizicing 
the staff, but Cmincil, 
because "we do noth- 
ing." He said Ht wanted 



to control the spending 
and reduce the spending. 
He said he was opposed to 
the 80 cent (per $100 
valuation) tax rate and 
proposed to decrease it to 
74 cents. He said there 
are so many "sacred 
cows," and that his sense 
of public responsibility 
does not fit this particular 
model. He said he hoped 
he was not alone. 

It turned out, he was. 

Councilman Dr. J. 
Ifcnry McCoy Jr. said that 
if Jennings prcqxKed a 
decrease in the real estate 
tax, he wcHiid have\to 
come up with the mon^y 
from another source. 

Jennings illustrated 
inojngruity in the city's^ 
spending in its $6,000 
contribution to the 
National League of cities. 
He said that the League 
was supporting legislation 
that would let cable ccxn- 
panies increase the basic 
rate by five percent a 
year, removing control 
fr«n localities. He said 
the view was in direct 
opposition to the Coun- 




cil's positi(m. He said 
there were probably 
hundreds of other exam- 
ples. He said, "Let's call 
it a redistribution of 
wealth." 

Councilwoman Nancy 
Creech said that it was 
stafrs resp<»isibility to 
prepare the budget and 
that she did not agree that 
a staff had no input. She 
said the staff was doing 
exactly what it was hired 
to do. "I wcMildn't know 
where to begin. She said 
she was sure there were 
"things we could do with- 
out" but that the cost of 
government is more 
today. 

J^nings found inade- 

(juate the procedure being 

observed of having the 

epartment heads appear 

fore Council and "read 
to us." 

Creech said it was 
Council's respcmsibilitv to 
make changes. McCoy 
charged that Jennings' 
statement would succeed 
in hitting the papers. "A 
six percent decrease in 
the taxtaie is all anybody 



is going to read," he said. 
He said the reduction, 
which wcHild represent a 
$4>/2 million loss in reve- 
nue, is something not 
broached in the proceed- 
ings previously. He said 
that the city has 
decreased the tax rate in 
previous years, but that 
he did not think Council 
could do it this year. He 
said the school and city 
employees both want 
mor/e mcmey and that >m 
agreed with them. 

Jennings said to McCoy 
that he never conplained 
when McCoy got into the 
newspaper and "I'm not 
running for office!" 

City Manager Thomas 
H. Muehlenbeck, who 
generally got high grades 
from Council for his pro- 
posed $192,034,554 
budget for fiscal year 
1983-84, said that the 
budget process is not 
unique to the beach, but 
follows established 
accounting practices. 

Mayor Louis R. Jones 
said that if Council wants 
to change the process it 



_^ill have to change the 
charter. 

Among controversial 
items in the budget. 
Council apparently wants 
to restore the $250,000 
allocatioi to the Eastern 
Virginia Medical School, 
is split over whether to 
turn the High Constable's 
Office over to the Trea- 
surer's Department, and 
is undecided over how to 
handle the Arts and 
Humanities Conunission 



support of a local Pq)s 
group over the Virginia 
Orchestra Group. 

Mayof Jones elicited 
Council members' feel- 
ings about the budget so 
far. Here they are: 

Creech supports the' 
EVMS allocation and 
salary increases for 
employees. She wants to 
give serious consideration 
to fund indigent hospital 
au-e. 

Heischober said that he 



exacted the proration of 
personal ptt^tty taxes 
wiU bring in Sl'/i million 
to SI4 million more in 
taxes rather than the Si 
projected. He said that 
the S3 1 7.000 aUocated for 
the High-Constable's 
(Mux vC^d be recouped 
by placing the dfice in the 
Treasurer's office. He 
would ako use S700.000 of 
the $6.7 million pr<q)osed 
fund balance on the 
revenue side, support the 



EVMS, place an appropri- 
ation for the VOG in the 
budget as a line item 
rather than under the Arts 
and Humanities budget as 
it was in the past, reduce 
the meal tax by one cent 
aod to pay for the addi- 
tional expenses ($1.8 
million would be lost firom 
a cent reduction in the 
meal tax) from anticipated 
treasurer's collections by 
using constables. 



Council Actions 



Continued from Page 7 
Applicition of BOSOIM A Associates for a change of 
zoning from R-S Residential Dislrici to R-8 Residential District 
on a 7.2-atrc parcel located along the north side of South 
Lynnhaven Road, east of Pritchard Road (Lynnhaven 
Borough). Letter from the City Manager transmits the recom- 
mendation of the Planning Commission for denial. Denied 1 1- 
0. 

ir Ordinances 

Ordinance authorizing the City Manager to vacate a 10' 
Drainage Easement lo Amterra Partners Net Lease Fund 1, 
across Parcel A-3, 5277 Princess Anne Road. Kempsville 
Borough (PizM Hut of America, Inc.). l^ter from the City 
Manager transmits his recominendation for approval. Ap- 
proved II .0. 

* Unfinished Business 

Beach Equipment Rental and Lifeguard Services Franchise 



Agreements for Area No. I (Ocean Rexue, Inc.) and Area No. 
2 (Virginia Beach Patrol, Inc. Approved 104. Kiichin ab- 
staining. 

Ordinance to amend and reordain Section 6-8, 6-9, 6-11, 6- 
16, 6-17 and 6-ia) of the Code of the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, and to repeal Article IV Division 2, Sections 6-81 
through 6-94, of the code of the City of Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, pertaining to beaches, boats and waterways in 
relation t lifeguard franchises. Approved 11-0. 

Ordinance to exempt the Community Development Program 
frmn indirect costs as determined by the Cost Allocation Plan 
for Program Years 3-7 was incorrectly listed as a first reading 
on the agenda of April 18, 1983. It, therefore, does not require 
a second reading on this agenda, as it is an exemption and not 
an allocation. No action needed. 

Reconsideration of application of Margaret Mills to rezone 
property R-6 lo A-1 in the area of Newsome Farms. Denied 6- 
3. Henley, R. Jones, Kitchin, McClanan, Oberndorf dissen- 
ting. 



Miaiis 




^^^^^^^^^^immrmmmm^^^^^mmm^mmm^^m^^m^^^^^^^^^aam^mm^^^ma^^mm^^m^a^ammmmtmmm^tmammmmmmmit^mmKmmmKimmm^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^mm^mmm^m^m^mmmtmm^^i^immmmmmmm^mmmmmK^^m^tmmmf^mma^fma^^mmm^mHmm^m^mmmmm^mm^^ 

RESTAUIUNT/1^€UID£ 



ONE 

THIN 

DIME 



Here's a great selection 

to take your Secretary to 

for National Secretaries Day! 



At NOBBY'S ENGLISH PUB 

Hilltoj) Sq. Shopping Center 
(Next to K-Mart) 

422-6684 



I 
I 
I 



■"Save '2.00 With This Coupon' 




Buy one of most anything 
for Regular Price and 
Get One for IOC 
Sun. 12 pm-4 pm 

Happy Hour twice daiij' 4-8 pni, 12-2 am 

Lai^e Sdcction of Imported Beer 
IndBdlng Dirk Draft 

Daily LuiKheoo Speciab 
Breakfast "Anytime" from 99C 



Same Specials at 

NOBBY'S TOO 

700 Newtown Rd. 

Virsinia Beach 

Two IOC Days Sat. ft San. 

12-4 pm 




PLUS FREE SALAD BAR 

SWith Any "AH You Can Eat" Sit Down Buffet 
■ 



Fillet of Trout Golden Fried '4.95 

Fried Chicken Crispy »4.95 

Fried Fillet of Flounder 

Hometown Favorite *5.95 

FriedClam Strips Tender »7.95 

Fried Deviled Crab In Natural Shell »8.95 
Fresh Fried Oysters In Season Select. »9.95 
Fried Shrimp Golden '9.95 



lUb Lovers, This is II! TImsc lender delidotts ribi arc coaled 
|Wilh Qur homemade sauce. Tr> 'cm oacc and you'll be 
believer. 

BBQ Baby Back Ribs *10.95 

Crab Cakes Our Own Homemade 

Maryland Style *10.95 

Spiced Shrimp Peel 'em yourself. 

Hot or cold »11.9$ 

Deep Sea Scallops If you like fried 
Scallops, this is it *12.95 



I 



(Vou may reorder 2 or 3 of any other buffet items of equal or less value than your original order, Reorders 
will be served only for customers placing the original order -Thank you; ™cr, kcwiwis 

6149 Va. Beach Blvd. 2406 E. Little Creek Road, Norfolk • 583-3793 3960 Turnpike Rd. 

Portsmouth 
399-5838 



Norfolk 
461-6654 



OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 



tJpen Moa. - Thurs. 4 JO - • JO/San. l2-a:30 Fri. ft Sal. 12-9 

...Save '2.00 With TNs Coupon—.. 




'Seafood ReataurtuU 
Specializing in Softshell & Steamed Crabs 

Friday & Saturday Night 
Specials 

ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET 

at 

$9.95 per person 



BUFFET 

Steamship Round AuJus • Steamed Shrimp 

Ciam Strips • Snow Crab Legs 

Slirimp Creole • Fried Filet of Trout 

Vegetable and Dessert 



Business Men's Lunch 
Call Ahead 

Regular Menu Available for 
Lunch and Dinner 

Live Entertainment 
Friday and Saturday Nights 

Banquet Facilities Available 
2314 Beauregard St. 

(COfMT of Anka Gardea « SewHI's Poial RoMb) 

Call: 853-2672 



• » 



: t 



^ Lounge 

Try Vfr^injas ^msi 
in Coun^ Df'nin^ 
ami Dancing 



^■1 



ii Live EnUfiainmen* hij 
j?*Tke\vfan5ferBarvd" 



815 SOUTH Ul»W<V«n t>K»/«4. 
4M-M43 ...... 



Or 



'■<Co«wv*f2 
j CooL j^ 



Sunday-Wrangler Gong Show, 1st prize 150.00 
Monday- Closed 

Tuesday-Ladies Nile • Happy Hour All Nice for Ladies 
Wednesday -Mens Nite • Happy Hour All Nitc 
Tight Jeans Contest, 1st prize SSO.OO 
(for Cowgirls) 
1 hnrsda}- Wrangler Rib Spwial • Bring a Friend 

2 for 1 $6.95 
Iriday-Slcamed Shrimp Special $5.95 

' 1 lb. in spicey beer broth 
Saturday Wrangler Steak Special $4.95 
Juicy N. Y. Strip cooked to order 



What's Cooking At 
The Circle? 



1" NEW YORK 
SIRLOIN STEAK 

»10" 

The best quality 
steak in Tidewater 



LIVE MAINE 
LOBSTER 

•14* 

I '/2 lb. stuffed with 
jumbo crab meat 



Eariy Bird Specials - 

Sauteed Chicken Livers 
Fried or Broiled Trout 
One Urge Crab Calte 
Fried Scallops 

LUNCHEON 
BtFFET 



•4.50 
»6.25 
»5.50 
»6.25 



'3^0 Tuesday- Sunday 



Full 'Vleab Ser%ed*8:30 ain-2 pm 
Tuesda thru Suiiday«Clotcd Monday 



NIGHTLY ENTtRIAINMLM 
Ra) Brown Al 1 he Piano 



'JSS 




'">^^ ) 



0'^ 

•f MOOD RE8TAUMANT A * L 



3010 High Street 
Portsmouth 





397-81% 



m-TTTTTm-J-rm 



Fantastic | 




FAMILY DAY 
EVERY SUNDAY 



L 



I QUEEN CUT 

PRIME RIB 

WITH SALAD ft POTATO 

) AmiMax. 

\ Ui VtStnt ran. 

nMtMKRM: 

AHOTMGGITYDOG 

ORHAMBimCER 

|«FREN(3I FRffiS « A COKE 

«^r.99C 

AadDM'l Forget 
OM-CMnilVAad 
Baa^wl ladHUcs. 




IN CHESAPEAKE 

THERE IS ONE RESTAURANT 
THAT PROVIDES 

• AntO^HEIIE 'ACSUr 

YOU WILL TaULY LOVE CREATIVB * PROFESSIONAL 

•^aivicx 'fooD 

THAT'S TaAOmONALLV "SOUTHERN" -fflAT TiU^ALIZES 

CEDAR COVE INN 

100 Ferawood Farm Road f***^ '^ for Ravervatiom 
547-3022 "TcTn^r 



! BuyuiyEiirractiRe(ularPn(zAa4 

Ccf Tht Stcoai Of Equal Value 

Or ten Abtolutely 

FREE Whk iMt CoHpoa. 



bvimMwI.nu 




Ch 




I 



■■■■■■■ 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 27, 1983 II 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



) 



Economist Predicts Continued 
Improvement In Housing And 
Real Estate Markets 



Existing single-family 
home sales are expected to 
totoal 2.7 million units in 
1983, well above the 1,99 
million homes sold in 
1982, according to the 
National Association of 
Realtors' most recent 
outlook for real estate, 

"The lower mortgage 
interest rates -- now. in the 
12 to 13 '/2 percent range - 
that have led to recent im- 
provements in the pace of 
the resale activity are 
likely to continue having a 
positive impact on 
existing-home sales as well 
as on new-home sales and 
construction," Dr. Jack 
Carlson, chief economist 
and executive vice 
president of the 
association, said. 

In the outlook, Carlson 
predicts that the 
seasonally adjusted an- 
nual rate of resales - 
reported at 2.47 million 
units in February - will 
approach 3 million units 
during the fourth quarter 
of this year and steadily 
increase throughout 1984. 

"Total resales in 1984 
are likely to surpass 3 
million units and could 
reach 3.5 million units the 
following year," Carlson 
^ added. 

Housing starts activity 
also is expected to show 
continued improvement, 
according to the 
association outlook. 
However, tjip February 
rate of starts -1.7 millipa ^ 
on a seasonally adjustra"' 
annual basis - may not be 
sustained unless mortgage 
rates decline more rapidly 



than is currently expected. 
Carlson said. 

For aU of 1983. Carlson 
predicts about 1.6 millioo 
new housing units to be 
started - 50 percent above 
the 1982 level. In 1984 and 
1985, starts could reach 
the 1.7 million mark. 

The economist said he 
expects the number of 
new-home sales to in- 
crease to about 600.000 
units this year » up 
significantly from 417.000 
units last year. 
, With regard to home 
prices. Carlson said the 
strong underlying demand 
for home ownership is 
likely to keep the rate of 
pri(x ap^edatitm of both 
new and existing single- 
family homes in 1984 and 
1985 above the inflation 
rate. 

By the bepnningof next 
year, the median existing- 
homt; price can be expec- 
ted to be in the $70,000 to 
$73,000 range and the 
median new-home price 
can be expected to ran^ 
fromf $75,000 to $77,000. 
he said. 

While residential in- 
vestment is likely to in- 
crease nearly . 30. percent 
throughout 1983 and play 
a major role In kading the 
economy to i4tweiy, in- 
vatment activity in com- 
mercial structures is ex- 
pected to remain fairly flat 
this year, he continued. 

The economist predicts 
that the value of private 
.commercial construction 
'• pat \k place - both apar- 
tment and non-residential 
~ should increase 16 per- 
cent in 1983, followed by 



increases of 12.4 percent 
in 1984 and 1.4 percent in 
1985. 

"Construction of 
new industrial buildings, 
however, will continue to 
decline through 1983 and 
not really recover until 
late 1984 and 1985 when 
existing industrial capacity 
is more fully utiliz^ &kd 
the business financial 
position has improved." 
Carlson added. 

Carlson attributed 
much of his optimism 
about realy estate activity 
in the coming months and 
years to the improved in- 
terest rate situation. 

Long-term rates could 
faH another 1 percentage 
point through 1984 and 
the average commitment 
rate of new home mor- 
tgages " currently slightly 
more than 13 percent - 
can be exp«:ted to trend 
ddwn^KiwJurd 12 percent 
by the fourth quarter of 
this year before heading 
upward next year, Carlson 
aooeQ. 

He strongly cautioned, 
however, that Congress 
and the administration 
must solve the problem of 
burgeoning federal 
deficits in the $200 billion 
range. 

Unless the budget is put 
firmly on a path leading 
toward balance, mortgage 
interest rates will remain 
much too high above the 
inflation rate — thus 
prefventing t^c recovery in 
poising an#(m)«f types bf 
ted estate from, being as 
strong as it would be with 
lower deficits. the 
economist noted. 



Shrimp 
Festival 
Kicks Off 
Celebration 



A mouth watering 
Shrimp Festival will help 
to kick off the celebration 
honoring the 20th an- 
niversary of the City of 
Chesapeake. 

The Chesapeake 
Kiwanis will sponsor the 
event to be held May 12th 
at the Greenbrier Nursery 
Compound located off 
Volvo Parkway in 
Chesapeake. 

hrom 3:30 to 6:30 p.m., 
participants will feast on 
sumptuous steamed 
shrimp, bar-b-que, 
southern fried chicken, 
baked beans and potato 
salad, plus a host of other 
delicious fixings. 

Area celebrities in- 
cluding newscaster Kim 
Kincaid and the reigning 
Miss Chesapeake will be 
on hand to enjoy the feast 
as well as the excitement 
surrounding the 

Chesapeake Jubilee. En- 
tertainment throughout 
the afternoon will be 
provided by a blue grass 
band. Door prizes will be 
awarded at 5:30p.m. 



Tickets for the Shrimp 
Festival are $12.50 per 
person pre-sale, and 
$15.00 at the gate. Those 
wishing to purchase 
tickets early should con~ 
tact the Chesapeak«| 
CJiafcbeL of CommerceNti* 
547-2118 for further in- - 
formation. , *'' 



The Builders 
Block 



by Dong Hkkniaa 

The Builders Block is a 
regular feature highlight- 
ing new construction in 
Virginia Beach and 
Chesapeake. 



Kemps ville Lake: 900 Units 



t 




OLDE 



TOWNE 

In Lirkspir 



A Custom Townhouse Community in 

the Urban Tradition. We offer 

exceptional quality at 

affordable prices 



"■°--^*" 



■iiiliii 



. atuCH t»»WT 





DIRECTIONS E«'I trom Eaprtttway ~ 
South oniotnd«Mndwie«eiyd Contmut 
to N«« lndep«r«l*ne«. turn light on 
Silv«rt«a' Or Model* on tett' 



Kay Afdahl 
460-2770 




Hone 
460-1610 



Model 
490-2356 



REALTY DIMENSIONS INC. 

riSt IB fi} 



Kempsville Lake is a 
large, but quite unique 
townhome community 
built around a 9Vi acre 
lake. This development is 
in a prime area adjacent to 
Kempsville Meadows Ck)lf 
course, and only a few 
minutes from the new . 
F&M Building, Pembroke 
Mall and the expressway. 

There are three very 
distinct communities 
located within Kempsville 
Lake. Colcmial, Cmtem- 
porary, and Traditional 
styles of townhomes are 
available, each in its' own 
sectitm to preserve ' the 

architectural integrity of 
the development. 
Thoughtful planning of 
land use is evident by 
Talbot and Associites in 
the feeling of spaaous- 
ness you experience 
throughout the develop- 
ment. There will even be a 
lighted jogging trail 
around the lake fen* your 
convenience. Also plan- 
ned are championship 
tennis facilities. Olympic 
pool, toddler pod, bath 
house, and play areas, in 
addition to a 3.400 sq. ft. 
rtt;reati(m center. 
^^Itlhit sounds appealing 
to you, you're not alone in 
jji^r thoughts. Forty- 
seven units were sold 
before construction 
began, one hundrni 
seventy-six sales were 
recorded in 1982 when 
marketing officially 
began, and eighty seven 
units have been sdd to 
date this year. 

The Colonial and Tradi- 
tional communities 
employ the same floor 
plan of 1.064 to 1,574 sq. 
ft. The only differances 
being aU brick construc- 
tion for the Cdoml with 
vinyl being used for the 
exterior of the Traditional, 
and masonry fireplaces in 
the Cdonial and metal in 
the Traditional. Both com- 
munities employ a colon- 



ial style, each distinctive 
in its' own right. There 
are six basic models in the 
Colonial section ranging 
in price from $61,200 to 
$69,800 with two and 
three bedrooms and 1 Vi to 
2Vi baths. Prices in the 
Traditional section are 
from $58,200 to $66,200 
with two and three bed- 
rooms with VA to 2*A 
baths. Cdonial and Tradi- 
tional each have ranch 
units on the ends. 

The Contemporary sec- 
tion has four basic floor 
plans ranging from a 
st»cious I5(M sq. ft^ to a 
large 1703 sq. ft., making 
them some of the largest 
townhomes offered in Vir- 
ginia Beach (garages not 
included in sq. footages). 
Like a large bed room? 24 
X 12 is available in certain 
Contemporary models. , 

The builder and devel- 
oper of Kempsville Lake is 
R.G. Moore Building 
Corp. R.G. Moore has 
become a name synony- 
mous with quality in Tide- 
water. Moore has been 
building homes locally for 



twenty eight years. In the 
early seventies, he switch- 
ed from building custom 
homes to building on a 

larger scale with develop- 
ments. He did, however, 
retain his eye for quality 
and workmenship which 
has led to years of suc- 
cessfidly satisfying the 
needs of discriminating 
Tidewater homebuyers. 
Last year alone. Moqre 
recorded seven hundred 
forty-one sales, forty-nine 
percent being town- 
homes. 

Moore is currently 
involved in eight develop- 
ments, not counting the 
nine hundred units under 
construction at Kemps- 
ville Lake. He recently 
announced plans to build 
a Benefit House and 
donate the proceeds to 
Virginia Wesleyan Col- 
lege. MoOTe built a similar 
home last year for the 
Virginia Stage Company 
in Norfolk. 

"People know that 
when they buy a home 




built by R.G. Moore, 
they're assured of quality 
construction. Customer 
satisfaction is, and always 
will be, the most impor- 
tant consideration," said 
Sue Gregory, marketing 
director fw R.G. Moore. 

Professional Realty is 
the agent for the Tradi^ 
tionat section of Kemps- 
ville Lake. Professional 
has successfully marketed 
in Campus East, Hunt 
Qub Forrest, Red Mill 
Farm, The Meadows, and 
Rosemont Forrest. 



The Colonial and Con- 
temporary sections are 
marketed by Realty Con- 
sultants, who presently 
are invdved with new 
home sales at sixteen sites 
in Tidewater. "Realty 
Consuhants consistently 
handles more new home 
volume in Tidewater than 
any «her company," said 
Steve Peppier, sales man- 
ager for Realty Consul- 
!ants. 



LANDS END 




lANDS END 




AFFORDABLE CONDOS 
AT THE BEACH 

♦Monthly Principle & Interest 
VHDA - 5 yr. Buy Down (Limited 
Amount) 

$2650.00 DOWN PAYMENT 

ADD $50 For Taxes & Insurance 

MODELS: OPEN 12-6 428-S198 

NIGHTS: Alice Pylc 34M441 

PYLE REALTY 460.1Tn 




4«0-l#77 



Pyle Really Promotes 
Virginia Beach 







51 10 Greenwich Rd. 
Va. Bch., VA 23462 
499-3330 .. 

A DIVISION OF COLONIAL SERVICE CORPORATION 



^Alianlk P^trnanent M<»1ea^ CcnvaiQ^ 

A Whtrily Owi^ SuMdiary of Atlantic Permanaii Federal 
Savti^ & Loan Association 

944 Independence Blvd. 
Virginia fieach, Virginia 23455 

(804)460-1376/2810 



^^Solomad 




^mwi^M/nu 



A OtVISKW OF COLONIAL %R VKX CXMPOKATION 

Virpnia Beach Boulevard West 

Norfolk, Virginia 23510 

Phone (804) 623-3733 



(^olomal cJitie 



kA.C 



gency 



A DIVHON OF OOLmffAL Kl VICE CMVDKATIOM 

944 Independence Blvd. 
Va. Bch.. VA 23455 
#•-1416 , 



Tte rc»d to succe^ starts whai 
you are inspired to make the effort. 
We guarantee you will be 
motivate in just one hour with us. 
This success need not be 
specifically in sales. It oui be yours 
from a working knowledge of the 
real ^tate market. 

So, why shouldn't you take that 
first step on the Road to Success! 

CaU Us Today! 

Surety 

Rtal Estate Scho<ri 

S?37 Mmx» Aue Road 
Vvpnia Bach, VA 23462 

499-2395 




Carol Baswell 

Wc welcome Ken Bowden and 
Carol Baswell to our company. 
Both reside in the Great Bridge area 
of Chesapeake and are anxious to 
help you with any of your real 
estate needs. Call Ken at 482-4737 
(home) or Carol at 482-2735 (home), 
or 547-4555 (office). 

Wt ARK SO. I IN CKKA I BKIIK.t 

RICARDO, IHC. 
REALTORS 

1S1JOHMTOWNIK>AO CHESaMAKE, VA. 

547 45S5 

hi ^M NmH 0( Gf ••! trMf* 



"""^■^"^■■^"WilW 



^r^BPi 



iwaiMBn 



12 Virginia Beach Sun, April 27. 1983 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 




Fulk, A Community 
Minded Business 



Bev Fulk grew up on a 
farm in the Shenandoah 
Valley. After graduating 
from high school in 1951, 
he went to work fw 
Bausch and Lcwnb Whole- 
sale Optical Co. doing 
lens grinding and fabri- 
cating glasses in the 
Harrisonburg, Va. office. 

In 1960 he was pro- 
moted to salesman and 
transferred to Norfdk. 

While wOTking as a sales- 
man, and later manager 
for Bausch and Lomb he 
passed the state board 
and became a registered 
optician. 

'^ Until Etecember 1982 
when Fulk decided to 
open his own (^tical busi- 
ness, he had been associ- 
ated with two other retail 
optical companies in 
Qiesapeake and Norfolk. 
Wanting a central location 
for his customers he 
decided to locate near 
Military Qrcle at 5847 B 
Poplar Hall Drive. His 
office is ccmviently located 



opposite Leggett's next to 
Brand Distributors. Bev 
extends an invitation and 
friendly welcome to every- 
one to visit. His deep 
inventory of fi'ames and 
non-prescription sun- 
glasses offers wide 
variety, depth and availi- 
bility. 

Bev and his wife Ann, 
reside in Norfolk. TTiey 
are members of 
McKendree United 
Methodist Qiurch. They 
have three children and 
two grandchildren. Their 
daughter Ccmnie is mar- 
ried and lives in Wood- 
bridge, Va. Their sai 
Scott is a senior, majoring 
in engineering at O.D.U. 
Rickey is a junior at Ryan 
School. 

Bev and Ann have been 
active in scouting and 
little league and now 
enjoy watching their son 
pitch baseball fen* Ryan 
School. TTiis newspaper 
recognizes a community 
minded businessman ind 
just wanted to take this 
opportunity to say so. 



Rocky Mountain High 
Comes To Tidewater 



ByDoQgHickniRn 

Real Estate & Business Editor 

On Monday April 25, 
Coors Light Beer, and 
bottled Coors came to 
Tidewater. Although 
Coors has been available 
locally for several years, 
it's pirce was overly in- 
fla^d due to middleman 
expense. Now Coors in 
cans, bottles and the new 
Coors Light, will be 
available at competitive 
prices. 



Hecht Distributing Co., 
Inc., local distributer for 
the Colorado based 
Adolph Coors Co., has 
constructed an additional 
12300 sq. ft. of refrigerated 
storage space which will 
accomodate sixty 
thousand cases of the 
latest viable entry into the 
Tidewater premium beer 
market. 

If local beer drinkers 
are like those of Miami, 
Hecht will need every inch 
of space in their new 
cooler. In the first six 
weeks of competitive 
Coors pricing in Miami, 
the local distributor sold 



in excess of one million 
cases! 

The reason Coors may 
now be priced com- 
petitively is a change in the 
marketing poUcy of the 
Coors company. Coors 
was previously sold in 
only twenty-six states, 
mostly in the western half 
of the country. So, Coors 
had to be bought from a 
western distributor, in- 
stead of from the brewery 
directly, plus, with the ad- 
ditional shipping expense, 
Coors was quite expen- 
sive. Now Coors will come 
directly from the Adolph 
Coors Co. to the Hecht 
Distributing Co., Inc. 
which will reult in much 
lower prices and happier 
beer drinkers. 



Coors for years seemed 
to be cloaked in mystery, 
the Coors Mystique if you 
will. Gary Hecht, vice 
president of Hecht 
Distributing Co. Inc., set 
the record straight. 
"Although Coors believes 
constant refrigeration 




Trends 



By ROGER PYLE 



New single family 
homes completed in 1981 
were smaller and had 
fewer amenities than those 
built in 1980, continuing a 
trend away from larger, 
luxurious homes, accor- 
ding to statistics released 
by the CensusHJureau and 



the U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban 
Development. 

The median size home 
built contained 1,550 
square feet, or 45 square 
feet less than the median 
sized home (1,595 square 



feet) built in 1980 and 95 
square feet less than the 
median si^ home (1,645 
square fMt) built in 1979. 

Average square footage 
declined from 1,742 
square feet in 1980 to 
1,720 square feet in 1981. 



CHARACTERISTICS OF NEW SINGLE FAMILY HOMES 
AS REVEALED BY GOVERNMENT STATISTICS 



Houses With: 


1972 


1976 


1977 


1978 


1979 


1980 


1981 


Central Air 


43% 


49% 


54% 


58% 


60% 


63% 


65% 


2 or more batlis 


53% 


67% 


70% 


73% 


74% 


73% 


70% 


1 or more fireplaces 


38% 


58% 


61% 


64% 


62% 


57% 


55% 


Full or partial basements 


37% 


45% 


44% 


42% 


42% 


36% 


33% 


Garage or carport 






81% 


82% 


80% 


76% 


75% 










Electric heat 


36% 


48% 


50% 


52% 


51% 


51% 


50% 


1,600 sq. ft. or more 


38% 


49% 


51% 


54% 


53% 


50% 


47% 


4 or more bedrooms 


23% 


23% 


23% 


24% 


23% 


20% 


20% 



Statistics are not yet available for 1982, but I believe the trend to smaller homes 
will continue. 
Watch for (1) Mothers Day article next week. (2) First Talking House in this area. 



Save Energy & Money 
With Summer Home Needs 



"Now is the ^ime to 
begin preparing your 
home for summer-and 
save energy and money at 
the same time." 

•Sandra Shively of 
Goodman Segar Hogan 
Residential Sales Corp. 
suggests that early spring 
is the time to study your 
home's needs and plan 
purchases and projects to 
ready the home for sum- 
mer's heat. She listed the 
following ideas for the 
homeowner: 

•Several of the things 
you ordinarily would to 
prepare the home for win- 
ter also apply in the sum- 
mer: Check to see that you 
have the proper amount of 
insulation in attic and 
crawl space. Caulk around 
the windows and doors to 
prevent leaks. 



•Check the effec- 
tiveness of or consider 
buying a dchuraidifier for 
the room most frequently 
occupied by memlwrs of 
the family. A 

dehumidifier will make 
the room more livtble, 
and allow you to turn to 
air conditioning down-or 
off on "borderline" days. 

•Make certain the 
thermostat is functioning 
properly. Have it and your 
air conditioning unit 
checked by a local heating 
and air conditioning 
specialist. 

•If you have an attic, 
consider installing a fan to 
vent hot air outdoors. 
Cost of the fan, and it* 
use, will more than be 
made up in air con- 
ditioning savings within a 
short time. 



•Be careful about 
closing doors on days 
when air conditioning is in 

use. 

•Prepare simple, oven- 
less meals at least once a 
week to keep the air con- 
ditioning from working 
overtirae~and to keep the 
meal preparer cool as well. 



If you begin now to 
plan for summer, you can 
have a full-blown cam- 
paign under way by the 
time the 'dog days' 
arrive," Shively said. 
"B«t part is that you'll 
notice the differences two 
ways: your home will be 
comfortable and cooling 
costs will be manage- 
able." 



Conference On 
Fair Housing 



The Richmond Area 
Office of the Department 
of Housing and Urban 
Development will sponsor 
a two-day conference on 
Fair Housing. The Con- 
ference will be held April 
25-26, 1983, at the John 
Marshall Hotel, Rich- 
mond, Virginia. 

The Conference will in- 
clude a Fair Housing Lun- 
cheon commemorating the 
Fifteenth Anniversary of 
the passage of the Federal 
Fair Housing Act; HUD's 
Assistant Secretary of Fair 
Housing and Equal Op- 
portunity, Antonio 
Monroig, will be the Guest 



Speaker. 

HUD's Area Manager, 
1. Margaret White, stated 
that the Conference will 
focus on the Department's 
new initiatives in 
providing equal housing 
opportunities and will ex- 
plore approaches to Fair 
Housing by local gover- 
nments, private sector. 
Fair Housing and Civil' 
Rights groups, and com- 
munity-based organiz- 
ations. 

A pre-registration fee of 
$13.00 will be necessary to 
cover the cost of the lun- 
cheon. 



helps retain the smooth 
Coors taste, storing the 
beer at room temperature 
does not cause it to spoil. 
Coors is however, shipped 
to us in refrigerated rail 
cars and trucks." 

Most beer has a store 
life of ninety days, Coors 
is removed, if not sold, in 
sixty days. Coors is 
brewed for sixty-three 
days, while the average for 
others is twenty-three. 
Coors is also the only 
major U.S. beer that is not 
pasterized, but is screened 
for purety. The reason 
being Coors feels the 
pasturizing process (heat) 
affects the taste. Un- 
treated water and no 
preservatives are also an 
exclusive of Coors. 

"In most southern states, 
Coors in cans -has received 
about thirty percent of the 
market, and when draft 
was introduced it gained 
placemet in forty to seven- 
ty percent of the market, 
but I don't like to make 
predictions, 1 like to get 
results," said Gary 
Hecht. 




^^Sunset^' Act Will 
Eliminate Homebuyers 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 



HOMEOWNERS - REALTORS I 

SECOND : 

j MORTGAGE LOANS \ 



Half a million 
Virginians with moderate 
incomes may soon be 
eliminated from the state's 
home-buying market if a 
"sunset" provision in 
federal tax legislation 
passed two years ago 
remains law. 

"The Future of Tax 
pxempt Housing Bonds- 
jA Legislative BattU" will 
Mr^on "Financial Enter- 
prise'^(PBS) the last week 
in April. John Ritchie. 
Jr., president of the 
Council of State Housing 



Finance Agencies (CSHA) 
and executive director of 
Virginia Housing 
Development Authority 
(VHDA), will be the 
program's featured guest. 

Randolph Rinehart, 
president of Home 
Builders Association of 
Virginia and Rinehart 
Construction, and Blake 
Cox, Assistant Vice 
President of \Nk Mor- 
tgage Corporation will be 
panelists on the show. 

Consult local listings 
for time and channel. 




(8()4»4r»1.2551 



I I ■ IT jm ■ r 



J L 



Serving The Real Estate Needs 
Of Chesapeake 

WAINWRIGHT REALTY 

Are you considering selling your home? If so, now is the ideal 
time. Call us for a free, no obligation market analysis. We will in- 
form you of the best methods of disposing of your property, 
various tvpes of financing available and other information per- 
tinent to the sale of your property. 

3237 Western Branch Blvd. 

In The Heart Of Churchland 




484-7777 



Members of Portsmouth, Chesapeake Multiple Listing Service 
Metro Muhiple Listing Service ' 
Porumouth, Chesapeake Board of Realtors 




Chesapeake Of f ice 
Supply 

Present this ad anilget 20% Discount 

on your purchase 

April 28 thru May 4, 1983 
(Not good on special price items) 



• Unadvertised Specials • 

*Open Sat. 9 -Ipm. * Off street parking 
* Copies while you wait * Free Delivery 



Weekly Specials 



*P/2- Vinyl . , 

Overlay Binder reg. O.JU 



Special ^3.95 



*Case Xerox ^ . -^^ 

Paper8'/2xU reg. '53.00 



Special *29.00 



•1" Vinyl Binders reg. ^3 .25 

Special ^1.95 




Chesapeake Office Supply 

1007 N. Battlefield Blvd. 

Battlefield Executive Center 

"Just South Of Hardee's" 

(804) 547-9661 



Jnthemarriageof 

good ideas fflid 

soundfkiaiKMplamimg, 

meetyourb^maa 

He s a Wheat, First Securities 
account executive. And if you've 
got the jitters aboix convniRit^ 
yourself to a financial pcogjam, 
he's the man to have fc^'your side. 

He representsoncof tfic 
arongest investment flrms in the 
Southeast One with 48 ofikes in 
six states and the D^Hict of 
Columbia. 

i fc s haclsed by one of the 
largest rcguwial investment 
reseaah staffs in the area, pita 
excliKi\e naikwal sources from 
Dallas to San Francisaj to New 
York. He can show you impressive 
eNidence trf their success in sKJck 
seieition. 

All ct^^ether. that means he 
can put wju in touch with oppor 
tunities aiToss the ration — or 
across the street In fact, he has 
nearly KX) finamial pruduceand 
services to offer you. And the 
^lity to ptwthem together in a 
firancial paiHsage th« cm gjow 
- aruiger through the yeas. 
Mast impoiam, yoM^Whca anxw™ exc».uii%e is a human 
being. One who knows htm' to treat iiher human beir^ and thek 
Bnam es with re^xti -whether y< lu re reath n > invest big now, or 
jtBt want to take yiHir first Sep towiifd buiklmg lor a bigger, bene 

So call the Wheat office ne»est you uxtoiMKlnafce an 
ai^ramem Uj tneet with yoia- heat itian. In the mairi^of gotjd 
ideas and sound financial planning, ht- II ■4aiul hs >t)u, Sarbener. 



For your llto. 



VourhMHh. 



Kbur busln«tt. 



Yburlulur*. 





V\/heat 



WE NCVBI KiaGETTHAniW 
COME TO US TO MAKE MONri' 



109 E. Main St. 
Nwfolk, VA 23510 

VAlNM*,Va 23431 
(104)428-0110 



mdhrtAMl or group, 

\A/b^ington Ncjtional can 
meet your needs with a 
broad range d quality 
programs artd complete 
financial services. We crffer 
life arxj health insurorce, 
estate pkanning, em- 
li^oyee consultation, 
pensions and annuities. 
Don't wait. Torrxsrrow's 
security and peace of 
mind start with today's 
prfonnirxj. Oall now for a 
tradition <^ »fvice you 
can count on. k% 
TIdvwalw coll 490^^66. 



umtimmomAoatct 

PBMROKE OM MNUWiQ- 
VaOMA B&<»i VA. 23462 



u 



mtagfA 



■■■■■■■ 



• II(JI1U<1 Ut'dCII aUII, /\pitl ^/, 190J I > 



Business, Real Estate & Finance 



Four Promoted At 
Accounting Firm 



Sea Dream Still 
A Youngster 



Swartz, Bresenoff, 
Yavner & Jacobs, P.C. 
'Certified Public Accoun- 
tants, has announced the 
promotion of four mem- 
bers of the firm. Robert 
G. Bielat, CPA and 1. 
Wayne Cooper, CPA were 
named managers of the 



accounting and auditiiig 
department, Delbert T. 
Patrick, Jr., CPA was 
named manager of the 
data processing depar- 
tment and David A. 
Thereault, CPA was 
named manager of the 
newly formed tax depar- 
tment. 



Metro Information 
Among Fastest 
Growing 



Metro Information Ser- 
vices, Inc. of Virginia 
Beach, recently recog- 
nized by Inc. magazine as 
the 105th fastest growing 
privately held company in 
the country {Inc. 500, Dec. 
•1982) was ammg 200 

companies that attended a 
special program spon- 
scffcd by the Common- 
wealth of'ICentucky and 
Inc. magazine called "A 
Celebration of the Entre- 



preneurial Spirit." 

The program, which 
took place recently in 
Lexington, Kentucky, at 
the Hyatt Regency Hotel, 
brought together the chief 
executive officers and 
senior management of 
America's fastest growing 
companies for a two day 
fomm, the formal portion 
of which focused on 
"Capital Ideas: Financing 
Options for Growing 
Conpanies." 





Gary D. Bennett 
Account Executive 
Wheat Fint Securities 




Kathryn Evangelist, Manager and Eric Coard, A>sl. Manager, Lyanhaven 
Mall Sea Dream Leather Store. 



Shames Honored As 
Outstanding Chairman 



Edward D. Shames, 
CIC, vice president of In- 
surance Management 
-Corporation of 

Tidewater, Inc., in Nor- 
folk, was honored to night 
by The Professional In- 
surance Agents 
Association of Virginia 
and the District of 
Columbia, Inc. He 
received lh» "Outstandiiiig 
Chairman" award from 
Jams 

CIC, p^<«K»it ^ 
association during the 
association's awards 
ceremony. 

The awards ceremony 
was the final function of 
the 47th annual conven- 
tion of the PIAA- 
V.A&DC, which began on 
Sunday. The convention 
was held at the Colonial 
Wiliamsburg Lodge and 
Conference Center, 
Williamsburg, Virginia. 

Earlier in the day. 
Shames was elected to 
a three-year term on the 
association's board of 
directors. 

The "Outstanding 



Chairman" award is 
presented annually to the 
chairman who has done 
the most outstanding job 
during the year. Mr. 
Sham» served as chair- 
man of the membership 
committee. During his 
year as chairman, he in- 
volved many of the 
associationf's members in 
a campaign, asking them 
to contact non-member 
; nboutjqining the 



Shames earlier served as 
chairman of the public 
relations committee and 
of the convention commit- 
tee, doing an excellent job 
both years. 

Since he became mem- 
bership committee chair- 
man last June. 169 agents 
have joined the VA-DC 
association. Hundreds of 
other agents have been 
contacted so the results of 
the committee, under the 
leadership of Mr. Shames, 
will be feh for motnhs to 
come. 



Sea Dream Leather, 
Inc. was founded in 1972 
by Pete Ashby, Jim Storie 
and Ray Tdson while 
students at Virginia com- 
monwealth University. 
The original business ccxi- 
sisted of wholesaling 
belts manufactured by 
the three founders. Up(»i 
graduation the business 
expanded into retailing a 
wider line of products. 
Eventually three stores 

were q^ened in the Rich- 
raOTd area, 917 West 



Grace Street (closed Jan- 
uary 1980), Cloverleaf 
Mall and Regency 
Square. A store was 
opened in Colisium Mall 
in Hapmton in htovember 
of 1979. Other stores 
have (^ned in Lynch- 
burg (a franchise in 
Riverridge Mall), Char- 
lottesville (Fashion 
Square), Norfolk (Military 
Qrcle), and Lynnhaven 
Mall in Virginia Beach. 

Sea £)ream offers a 
complete line of leather 
goods and services. Their 
products range from all 



leather footwear to gar- 
ments, luggage and 
accessories. They manu- 
facture a wide range of 
their own products in the 
Richmond shop. This 
enables the company to 
service what they sell and 
ensure a high level of 
quality. They pride them- 
selves in their product 
knowledge, experience 
and service and believe 
they have established 
stores in which custcmiers. 
can feel confident their 
best interests are served. 
Employees provide a 



cordial atmosphere in 
each store and customers 
can purchase the very 
finest quality leather pro- 
ducts from a well 
informed and professional 
staff. 

Co-owner Jim Storie 
stated, "Our successes 
are directly attributable 
to well informed, 
courteous and capable 
employees and, of course, 
quality at affordable 
prices. The durability of 
our products means we 
d(Mi't see our custwners 
as frequently for replace- 
ments, but, we get them 
back because we stand 
behind everything we 
make." Sea Dream defi- 
nitely "has it made in 
Virginia," in more ways 
than one. Watch this 
young comer and the 
young executives who run 
it! 



Growing 

The ''Bull Market'' 



Bank Of Virginia 
Connects With MOST 



Twenty-five Agents 
Certified 



Bank of Virginia has 
connected with the MOST 
system through the EFT 
Group's interchange swit- 
ch in Dayton, Ohio. 

This marks the first 
sharing of automatic teller 
machines (ATMs) between 
Virginia banks par- 
ticipating in the MOST 
network. A group of in- 
stitutions in the District of 
Columbia area have been 
operating in the inter- 
change since last Decem- 
ber. 

Cardholding customers 
of participating finandat 
institutions now have ac- 
cess to their checking and 
MasterCard accounts at 
37 Bank of Virginia Ginny 
locations in the Northern 
and Central Virginia 



areas. The bank will go 
statewide by the end of the 
month by adding 29 Ginny 
machines in the easterh 
and western sections of i 
the state, stated David 'k. 
Hunt, senior vice 
president of Bank of 
Virginia. 

By month end the 
MOST network will num- 
ber 179 ATMs at par- 
ticipating banks and 
savings and loans in 
Maryland, District of 
Columbia and Virginia. 
Hunt said that number 
will more than double 
later this year. 

Work is underway to 
add the MOST logo to 
Bank of Virginia's ATM 
cards and Ginny machines 
to publicize the inter- 
change to the public. 



EFT: Instant Money 



To speed banking transactiais and save you money, 
many of the nations's financial instituUons are 
switching to EFT. an acronmy for Electronic Fund 
1 ansfer. Although the system is not nationwide now. 
reports the Better Business Bureau, most banks— even 
the small ones— will tie into EFT soon. 

Several EFT systems akeady are in use. Automated 
Teller Machines (ATMs) let you get instant cash, make 
deposits, pay bills, and transfer funds from <«c account 
to anther by pressing a couple of buttoms. The 
machine is activated via a plasUc card that you msert 
into a slot. 

Point-of-sale terminals (POS) are now m big 
shopping centers. They permit the transfer of funds 
from your account to the merchant's account. You put 
an EFT awd into the store's terminal and punch in the 
am(Huit of the purchase. 

Preauthwized payment is another automauc system. 
It lets y<xi withdraw or cteposi^^ fiinds to your account. 



e.g., your paycheck goes directly from your employer to 
your bank. 

Telephone transfers let you transfer funds from one 
account to another: savings-to<hecking. And you can 
order payment of a bill by iriione. 

•Will I get a record ot the transactions? You get a 
written receipt with any cash purchase or cash 
withdrawal. It gives all information. 

•What about nustakes? You call the tmnk within 60 
days if you spot an error. The bank investigates the 
error aixl must correct it in 45 days. If the bank takes 
longer than 10 days, however, the bank must credit 
your account with the amount until the problem is 
solved. You get to use these funds at lU) charge. 

•How about loss and theft? Your loss is limited to S50 
per card. But you must notify the bank within 2 
business days after you find your card (or code) 
missing. 

•Do you have to use EFT? No. You have to ask the 
bank or financiid institution for the necessary cards. 



Twenty-five profession- 
al insurance agents from 
Virginia, Maryland, and 
Washington, D.C. were 
confirmed as Certified In- 
surance Counselors (CIC) 
in ceremonies held on 
April 26, 1983 in William- 
sburg, Virginia. Dr. John 
Fitzgerald, CIC, Vice 
President of the Society of 
Certified Insurance Coun- 
selors, conducted the con- 
ferment ceremonies 
presenting conferees the 
traditional diploma and 
pin. 

The CIC designation is 
awarded by the Society of 
Certified Insurance Coun- 
selors, a national non- 
profit organization 
dedicated to providing 
continuing education in all 
related major fields of in- 
surance and agency 
management. CIC is 
today the nation's larg^t 
professional education 
program for agents and 
other practitioners and the 
only program with a con- 



tinuing education 
requirement. Some 5,000 
agents across the United 
States have earned the 
CIC designation are to be 
commended on their ob- 
vious dedication to 
professionalism as eviden- 
ced by their complettion 
of the rigorous 
requirements leading to 
conferment as a Certified 
Insurance Counselor. 
Each conferee attended 
five 3-day institutes, 
passed comprehensive 
written examinations, and 
has agreed to the Society's 
continuing education 
requirement. 

Newly confirmed Cer- 
tified Insurance Coun- 
selors (CIC) from Virginia 
include: Jay A. Dorschel, 
Suffolk; Kark Ham- 
maker, Virginia Beach; 
Robert V. House, Suf- 
folk; Thomas C. Kauf- 
man, Norfolk; Edwin C. 
Kellam, Jr., Virginia 
Beach; H.B. Kellam, Jr., 
Virginia Beach. 



In recent weeks there 
has been a great deal of 
press about the "Bull 
Market" that is currently 
raging on "Wall Street". 
It might be interesting to 
determine what is meant 
by a "Bull Market", or 
for that matter a "Bear 
Market". Based simplv 
on the action of most 
stock prices it is fair to 
assume that a bull 
market's general trend is 

UP. The converse is true 
ofa bear market. 

By at least one account, 
these descriptive names 
are justified. It seems that 
the names are applied to 
the market based on the 
action each animal uses 
when attacking a foe. Fir- 
st, the bull, since that is 
our current market state. 
A bull, using its horns, at- 
tacks his foe with a lifting 
motion, from low to high. 
That is a good correlation 
for the action of the stock 
market since August. The 
bear attacks its foe, using 
its claws, with powerful 
downward thrusts. This 
seems to represent the 
trend of the market from 
late 1980 to July of this 



past year. 

One last very important 
point should be made. 
Many a lime has an in- 
vestor been in a position 
to sell stocks for a 
reasonable profit. Since 
the stock has as much 
potential to go down as it 
does to go up a cautious 
investor might "take his 
profits" (sell). A great 
deal can be said for the 
disciplined use of goals. 
Though goals often 
prevent tales of huge suc- 
cess and wealth, they do 
preserve profit. With this 
in mind we will add one 
more animal to our barn- 
yard of investing. That 
allows us to close with one 
of the great axioms of in- 
vesting; "Bulls make 
money and bears make 
money, but pigs get 
slaughtered." 

We stand ready to an- 
swer your questions on in- 
vesting in general or on 
specific stocks. In today's 
fast moving world. Stock 
Brokers of old have 
become Account 
Exnaitives and Financial 
Planners of new, handling 
all types of investments 
for all types of investors. 



SINCE 1886, WE'Vi: 
HEX TIDEMTEirS 
HNA>CIAl NEEDS. 

WE'RE STILI 
(iROWING TO MEET 
YOIRS. 



See US for rewarding savings plans and 
specialized loans. 

Home Federal 

Sa\^m5 and loan Assoaation 

" oJ Norfolk Ofgjnized 1»«6 

MwnOflice roOBou*S«i»tl.Nor»oiii.\»/627-6431 

erxirti Off ie« ThomM Com* / ^wtirnou* ' 

Newpon N«iM / Hwnpian / SuNi)«i ' Hilltop ' 
OmCitfi / G>M( Bndae ' QrafUm 




m^ 



4 




PRINTING 

Special Business Package 

*59.95 

1,000 Letterhead 

^atfooarySVixll 

1,000 Business Envelopes 

I BO. 10 



Black ink on white 20 lb. Bond 
Price includes negatives, piste, 
typesetting and composition 

CALL BRAD AT 4S6-0300 





m^ 



24M Oconee Ave. 

Vif|li*Bcadi 

Vhr^ita* 23454 



BYouveGotHieGiadesFBrCDlleficBut^ 
NeedFinandn&SeeThePeopleAlHBOplesBank. 

VMfe think there's nothing better than getting a good education. Because it's an invest- 
ment that will last you afltt^e rest of your Bfe. 

^cour^that's^ledsion you akiie can nuke. B^^^ 

todav the cost is iTwre than you afone can handte. ... i . 

So if you've decided coUege is the light place for you. renien*er that the people at 

Pfeoples Bank wouy like to help. Come see us abotrt a student loan. 
Because we'd r«ally like to see you make the grade. 



C»l 547-4515 for ai seven conv€ni«it locations. Men*er FCTC 



"^P^WVHIIBfV^M^^I^VI^ 



14 Virginia Beach Sun, April 27, 1983 



The Woman's View 




ByJIMKINCAID 



November 7, 1980. 

Some unidentified troublemaker brought a box 
of jelly doughnuts into the Thirteen newsroom 
today, and 1 was faced with an old problem. 

I don't eat jelly donuts. 

I like jelly donuts. 
In fact, I'm crazy about jelly donuts. 

But I don't eat them because no matter how 
carefully 1 plan my attack on a jelly donut, at least 
half of the jelly winds up on my tie. 

Napkins don't hdp; bibs, knivM and forks 
dcm't help; no matter how I eat a jelly donut, I 
wind up wearing most of the jelly, and a not in- 
considerable portion of the sugar glaze they're 
idways equipped with. 

So, I avoided those delightful booby traps of 
the pastry orld, and watched with glee when my 
producer chose one of the fattest of the lot. 

Justice, I thought, it's going to happen to 
somebody else. 

But it didn't. 

He consumed it to the last bite without staining 
even one fingertip. 

I consider that, at the very least, unkind. 

This series of excerpts from "Notes To My Frien- 
ds" is brought to you through the courtesy of The 
Donning Company, a local publishing firm, and 
Jim Kincaid. The book is available in most book 
stores. 




By CHUCK FAULKNER 



Fal, Clarifying - Heat the fat over medium heat, 
then add two peeled, sliced poutoes, depending 
on the maount of fat you have. Allow the potato 
slices to fry until brown. Remove the potato slices 
then strain the fat through a piece of cheesecloth 
into a clean container. 

Fat In Soups And Caueroles, Removing - A large 
lettuce leaf dragged across the mixture will pick up 
most of the fat. Repeat with another lettuce leaf 
if necessary. Or put two to three ice cubes in a 
piece of cheesecloth and drag it across the nux- 
ture. You'd be surprised how much grease will 
stick to the cloth. 

Fat Or Oil, Splattering - One of the easiest things 
to do is to simply sift or sprinkle a little flour into 
the hot fat or oil. It works immediately. 
Fire In Your Broiler - Quickly closing the oven 
door and turning off the heat should extinguish 
the flames in a few seconds. 



Chuck Faulkner is brought to you through the 
courtesy of The Donning Company, a local 
publishing firm, and Chuck Faukner. The book is 
available in most book stores. 





(9-A Beauty 



Spring 1983 is softer, too. The matte look to makeup 
is still in, so powder is a very important fashion product 
_.__, •A-m f^* woman as well as being a practical way for her to 

I J fl llfnif Pn assure long lasting makeup. Soft cheek and soft mouth 

V^llIlIUllCU... colors are very important. 

Pink Blush creme rouge and powder blusher is a 



By PATRICIA DAVIS 



Fashion Update 

Pink is in for spring! 

Knk fn- eyes... fffl'Ups... for cheeks. ..nails! 

There is a shift this Spring away from heavy makeup 
cdnings based on reds, plums and earth tones to a 
cleaner, fresher effect.. .and the color that does this is 
Pink! And we're talking about all kinds of pinks J Pinla 
with a touch of ccffal, pinks touched with blue, earthy 
pinks, pure pinks. ..they're all in the picture! 



must for Spring 1983. This pink nuy Ux^ bright in the 
creme compact but in actuality it blends to a soft 
natural cdor and actually responds to the natural color 
of the wearer for the pink tone that suits her skin best. 
The poweder blusher is excellent as it's sdt and so 
right! hi lipsticks Pink Champagne as a very 
fashionable choice. ..soft, shimmering and pinki For a 
more 'corally' pink there's Watermelon Ice, Wood Rne 
is an 'earthy' pink and worn with pink Mocha Frost on 
sane women takes on definite pink tones and has the 
luminescent quality that's very high fashion NOW! For 
brighter pinks there's Very Cherry and Warm Brick, 
both with blue tones. 

So get in the "pink" for Spring, call or write 
Patricia Davis, Janaf Office Bld$. Suite 320, Norfolk, 
Va. 23502 - 466-1668 for "Your Skin Care" or 
"Personal Makeup Tips." 





B.B. FULK 

OPTICAL COMPANY 

OPE^SATUKDAYS 
9 AM Til I PM 

• STORE FRONT PARKING 

• NEW PRESCRIPTIONS HLLED 

• GLASSES DUPLICATED 

• EMERGENCY REPAIRS 

• PERSONAL SERVICE 

5847-B Popiu HaJl Dr. 

Norfolk, Virginia 23502 

(betide Military Circle^KroM from Uggetu) 



461-3515 

RX Optidan 
Bev Fulk 



Mi^nifiers 
Ray-Ban 

Sunglasses 



Hours: Mon-Fri 9-5: JO 
Sat 9-1 
(No Af^nlment t^tceuKj) 




f*Ma§— ■■■J* 
IhMiJilibK'* 



OFFICIAL MULTIVITAMIN OF THE 1984 WINTER OLYMPICS 



spcdsl 
offer 

•7.39 

with this 
ad 



K>NUS OFFER 

30 FREE 
WTTHIOO 



f 



r=i 



uiiiliiini 



HwAk&a'- 



t 



INGRAM PHARMACY 

207 25th Street 
VAGINA BEACH. VWtGINIA 23451 

(804) 4^-6363 



The Whole Faimly Concept With No Waiting 



Low prices, good ser- 
vice and no appointments 
is the theme of Delbert 
and Alice Sexton, 
owners/managm of the 
Edia Adams' Cut & Curl 
Beauty Salons. 

First established in the 
Witchduck and Virginia 
Beach Boulevard area in 
July 1970. the franchise 
has expanded to 1 1 salons 
in the Tidewater area with 
one more opening up 
within the next 6 weeks at 
the Elmhurst Square 
Shopping Center in Por- 
tsmouth. 

From the very b^jn- 
ning their idea was to 
provide a facility where 
the whole family can find 
the style of their choice, at 
a price they can afford 
and with no hassle of 
having to make appoin- 
tments or long delays. 

Whoi you attend any of 
their salons you will find 
they do in fact have plenty 
of staff and are trained in 
the latest hair styles and 
cuts. 

The training for all the 
salons is mainly handled 
by their son Debert, Jr. 
who also assists in 
managing the business. Their 



daughter, Linda handles 
the supplies for the salons. 
All the Edie Adams' 
salons pride thonsdves on 
bdng able to change with 
the needs of their 
cptomers. One of the 
best examples is their ap- 
proach to the ah'eady im- 



portance of hair care for 
men. 

Edie Adams now 
feature a complete range 
of men's hair services, in- 
cluding men's perms, the 
natural way to add 
fullness to hair. 

If you're in a hurry, low 



on cash and need help 
with your hair needs, stop 
in the Edie Adams nearest 
you. 

With 12 salons, Edie 
Adams is always in need 
of Hair Stylist. If in- 
terested please contact the 
salon nearest you. 



iiliUlllllilll 



w » 



EDIE ADAMS Cut & Cur 




Aa acted on the wlmlowi: No AppolntmenU, Just Come In. 



beveloping Social Skills At 
Three Years Old 




A three-year-old is 
usually gregarious, full of 
talk, and willing to be 
friends with other 
children. 

But in strange social 
situations ev«i the most 
otttgoind child may- sud- 
denly turn anxious, fear- 
ful, and clinging, accor- 
ding to Growing Child, 
the monthly child develop- 
ment newsletter. 

An only child may be 
overwhelmed by a group 
of as few as four strange 
children. Even a normally 
friendly child may be 
unable to adapt to strange 
children if she is under 
stress-like adjusting to a 
new baby at home. 



Pushing a child forward 
and insisting that she 
make a place for herself in 
a group of strange 
children who are akeady 
involved in play is not a 
good idea. This only adds 
to tha child's anxiety and 
tension. 

Parents sometimes seem 
to expect social skills of 
children that they do not 
expect of themselves! We 
forget the sinking feeling 
that we have when we find 
ourselves lUl al(me in a 
social group of strangers. 
In fact, most of us avoid 
such situations by saying, 
"If I have to go alone, I 
won't go!" 

Yet we expect a socially 



inexperienced child to feel 
comfortable and happy 
under the same circum- 
stances. 

Three-year-olds are 
capable of cooperative 
play. They enjoy it but are 
not yet very experienced in 
social interaction. It takes 
time and experience to 
share toys comfcn^bly, to 
take turns, to role play, to 
play together in a group. 
She needs the suppori and 
reassurance that only her 



parents can give as she at- 
tempts to strike out into 
the social order of her 
peers. 

The Growing Child 
newsletter follows a 
child's develo>^enl mon- 
th-by-month. For more 
information and a free 
sample copy of the news- 
letter, write Growing 
ChUd. P. O. Box 620N, 
Lafayette, Indiana, 47902. 
Include child's birthdate 
when writing. 



Cn). Cn-I. 


1 '^y^^ »' ^/uUt ' 


We have styling choices 

for everyone and for 

all ages! 

Professional Precision 
Perms Halrcato 

»13.95 up 'SJO 


«^ «M«. •'•^ 
UMMT «M3« fM-ltn 

OMMt mmx m-MM 


c-.i.A.v«c««— . 9-9TiiBr«day 



® 



A Year of 
Celebrations 

Virginia Beach 



tk saving 
Ha m»miig 



HAVE YQUH CAfimS 
AND FUftMITURE 
CtlANIO 
FtOWlRFRISH 
BY PROFESSIOiAlS 




Duradeait 

Endorsed by furnishings 
manufacturers, 
the Duraclean 
Foam-Absorption 
Process gets 
the dirt out 
that the other 
methods leave in! 

CaM us lor • Frea QuoU^n 

Flavor Fresh Carpet and Furniture Cleaning 

Duraclean-Biurton Specialists 
487-7941 Chesapeske 




tal(«s the soil OUT! 



Safest for fabrics and 
fibers. Watch colors 
and textures spring 
back to life It's all 
done in your home . . . 
ready for gpests the 
saftie day. 



WUch Do You Prefer? 



Nutri'Meiics 

"WKCtnA C otmtOa " 

Made From 
VITAMINS 




PROTEINS 



Other Cosmetics 

Made From 

Alcohol 




ChenuoUs 
Fonnaklahyde 



' *CompUmentary ' * skin analysis d 

makeup sasion in your home or 

our Jarmf Studio 



Let our experts help you look 
your best **NaturaUy*' 

CaU 466-1668 Today 
For Your App<^tmeiit 




fhitecnuLLfO 



■■■■■ 



wmimmmmmi 



^Hm^ 



V irginia beacn :)un, April z / , t yaj o 



Farm, Lawn & Garden 



VEGETABLE PLANTING GUIDE 1 jrickle Irrigation Most 



Crop 



Planting Distances 



Asparagus (crowns) 
Beans bush 
Beans, pole 
Beans, lima 
BeeU 
Broccoli 
Brussels sprouts 
Cabbage 
Chinese cabbage 
Carrots 
Califlower 
Chard, Swiss 
Collards 

Cucumbers 

Eggplant 

Endive 

Kale 

KoUrabi 

Lettuce (bibb) 

Lettuce (leaf) 

Muskmelons 

Mustard 

Okra 

Onioiu (sets) 

Peas (garden) 

Peppers (transplants) 

Potatoes (Irish) 

Pumpkins 

Radish 

Rutabaga 

Southern (blackeye peas) 

Sweet Corn 

Spiiuu;h 

Squash, svmma 

Squash, winter 

Sweet Potatoes (slips) 
Tomato^ 
Turnips 
Wateraictons 



m' 



In 
rows 

18 

1-2" 
4-12" 
3-4" 
2-3" 
15-24" 
18-24" 
15-18" 
12-24" 

1-2" 
14-24" 
6-12" 
18-24" 
12-18" 
18-24" 
9-12" 
10-18" 

4-6" 
6-10" 

4^" 
24-36" 

3-4" 
12-18" 

2-4" 

1-3" 

18i-24" 

10-21" 
4:7. 

1-2" 
3-6" 
2-4" 

6-12" 
3-6" 

24-36" 
3-7' 

12-18" 

18-36" 
^3" 
6-8' 



Approx. yield 
per 10' 



>^rox of 

row ft. to 

plant per 

person 



Transplants or seed 

required per 10' 

of row 



Between 
rows 
36-60" 
24-30" 
36-48" 
24-36" 
12-24" 
24-36" 
30-36" 
30-36" 
18-30" 
15-30" 
24-36" 
18-30" 
24-36" 
48-72" 
30-42" 
18-30" 
18-36" 
12-36" 
14-24" 
12-18" 
60-90" 
18-30" 
36^8" 
12-24" 
12-30" 
30-36" 
24-36" 
6-8' 
12-24" 
15-30" 
24-30" 
24-36" 
15-30" 
36^" 
3-10' 
36-48" 

36" 

12-24" 

7-10' 



3-4 lbs. 
3-5 lbs. 
6-10 lbs. 
3-5 lbs. 
8-10 lbs. 
4-6 lbs. 
3-4 lbs. 
10-25 lbs. 
20-30 lbs. 
7-10 lbs. 
8-10 lbs. 
8-H2lbs. 
8-15 lbs. 
8-10 lbs. 
10-20 lbs. 
3-6 lbs. 
4-8 lbs. 
4-8 lbs. 
4-8 lbs. 
5-10 lbs. 
15-25 lbs. 
3-6 lbs. 
MO lbs. 

7-10 IbSva^aaeee 

2-6 lbs. 
5-18 lbs. 
10-20 lbs. 
10-20 lbs. 
2-5 lbs. 
8-12 lbs. 
5-8 lbs. 
7-10 lbs. 
4-6 lbs. 
20-80 lbs. 
10-80 lbs. ^ 
8-12 lbs. 
15-45 lbs. 
8-12 lbs. 
8-40 lbs. 



15-20' 
20-50* 
10-30' 
20-30' 

10* 
10-20' 

IC 
10-15' 
10-15' 
10-20' 
10-15' 
5-10* 
10-15' 
15-20' 
3-6' 
5-10' 
10-15' 
5-10' 
15-20' 
10-15* 
8-12' 
5-10' 
5-10' 
. 15-25' 
40-60' 
5-10' 
75-100' 

10' 

10-15* 

5-10' 

25-30' 

40-60' 

30-40' 

5-10' 

10' 

75-100' 

10-15* 

10' 
10-15* 



Hfof 

Plants 

7-8 crowns 



5-8 or 
5-7 or 
5-8 or 
8-12 or 

5-8 or 

5-7 or 

5-7 or 

6rl0or 

3-5 or 

7- 10 or 
3060setsllb. 

5-7 



Amount 
of seed 

loz. 

loz. 

loz. 
1/8 oz. 

1/10 oz. 
1/10 oz. 
1/lOoz. 
1/5 oz. 
1/5 oz. 
1/10 oz. 
1/5 oz. 
1/lOoz. 
1/lOoz. 
1/40 oz. 
1/40 oz. 
1/10 oz. 
1/10 oz. 
1/40 oz. 
1/40 oz. 

1/8 oz. 
1/10 oz. 

1/5 oz. 

1-2 oz. 

lib. 
1/20 oz. 
1/lOoz. 
1/8 oz. 

1 oz. 

1/2 oz. 

1/8 oz. 

1/lOoz. 

1/lOoz. 



Popular In July 



7-10 

3-7 

1 (peal pot) 



The greatest interest in 
trickle irrigation usually 
occurs about July when 
the novelty of moving 
sprinklers and hoses about 
the garden has worn off 
and the impossibility of 
watering and harvesting 
in the garden at the same 
time has become evident. 
While you are planting 
the garden is the time to 
plan and install your trick- 
le system. 

Trickle irrigation 
involves frequent, some- 
times daily, applications 
of small amounts of water 
to replace mdsture in the 
soil as it is being used by 
plants. This is done by 
using a system of "remit- 
ters" or hoses to slowly 
apply water under low 
pressure to the plant root 
zone. 

There are a number of 
advantages to trickle irri- 
gation over traditional 
watering systems. 

•considerably less 
water is required, to meet 
a plant's needs for (^ti- 
mum growth. 

•since the plant is never 



that allow water to seep 
from the hose to the soil 
are extremely small, par- 
ticles in some water such 
as fine sand, algae, and 
salts that build up due to 
evapwation and chemical 
reactions can clog these 
holes. Chemical treat- 
ments or filers may be 
requied to ccarect these 
problems. 

Run-off - fine textured 
soils such as clays may not 
absorb water fast enough 
to prevent ponds and run- 
off. Sandy soils and 
medium textured soils are 
usually best for trickle 
irrigation. 

Slopes - steep slq?es in 
the garden may resuU in 
fifty percent mwe water 
being applied at the lower 
end than the upper end of 
the hose. Terracing or 
raised beds will help this. 

There are a number ot 
commercially available 
emitters with different 
application rates. Com- 
plete kits to set systems 
.-... W..W.V. fo*" * backyard garden 

pnihdterw^atlFrtfHSi^«s«ally 30x50 feet) can be 

production is increased, purchased 



1/8 oz. 
I/2O9Z. 



Rules For Transplanting 



By E. P. Ciirlli^, 

Ea teMloB AgMt 

Here are ten steps to 
follow when transplan- 
ting: (1) Use planu that 
are healthy, stocky, 
medium-sized, free from 
disease, and have good 
roott. (2) "Harden off" 
to adapt to environmental 
change. (3) Plant tran- 



splants on a shady day, in 
late afternoon, or in early 

evening to prevent wilting. 
(4) Soak the roots of tran- 
splants thoroughly an 
hour or two before setting 
them out in the garden. (5) 
Handle the plants 
carefully. Avoid distur- 
bing the roots. (6) Dig a 
hole large enough to hold 



the roots. Set the plants 
one inch deeper than 
previously planted and at 

recommended intervals. 
Press soil firmly around 
the roots. (7) Pour one 
cup of starter solution in 
the hole around the plant 
(a starter solution can be 
made by dissolving two 
tablespoons of a water 



A TRACTOR FOR 




soluble fertilizer in one 
gallon of water). (8) Put 
more soil around each 
plant, but leave a slight 
depression for water to 
collect. Break off any ex- 
posed parts of peat pots so 
that they will not act as 
wicks and pull water out' 
of the soil. (9) For a few 
days after transplanting, 
shade the plants by 
placing a piece of 
newspaper or cardboard 
on their south sides. (10) 
Water the plants once or 
twice during the next 
week. 



sometimes by as much as 
100 percent. 

•since only the soil 
directly around the plant 
roots is wetted, the gar- 
den is accessible at all 
times. 

•since you are not 
watering pathways and 
non-production areas, 
fewer weeks are encou- 
raged to grow. 

•the foUage will not be 
wetted by a trickle system 
so disease problems will 
be reduv'"d. 

•water soiuble fertili- 
zer can be applied 
through the jxidde irriga- 
tion, making the job 
easier and reducing the 
chances of fertilizer burn 
on foliage and stems from 
sidedressing. 

•since water is applied, 
slowly, it puts less ofLa 
strain oi the water system 
in dry periods particularly 
if you are on a well or 
spring. 

•the trickle irrigatioi 
system can be autanated 
by the use of a simple 
timer and sdencMd valves 
so you don't have to 
about watering if you're 
gone f<x a few days. 

There also are some 
problems associated with 
trickle irrigatiwi that you 
should be aware of when 
considering a system. 

ac«ging - the holes 



A system generally ccm- 
sists of a main line to 
carry water irom the 
house to the garden, a '/2 
inch in diameter black 
polyetheylene pipe will 
work. At the end of this 
pipe at the garden site a 
fiow regulating valve is 
inserted with plastic 
adaptors to control the 
amount of water deUver- 
ed. A 1 gpm (gallon per 
minute) flow-regulating 
valve will supply enough 
water in one hour for a 
l.OOO-square-foot garden. 

The black plastic pipe is 
continued across the gar- 
den as a header. Commer- 
cial emitters are attached 
to the header with appro- 
priate adaptors to carry 
water directly to the base 
of the plant. The emitters 
or hose is most effectively 
placed under the sdl sur- 
face ot beneath mulch 
material. 

The rate and frequency 
of applicatiOT will depend 
on the type of system 
installed. Total applica- 
tion will depend on the 
type of system installed. 
Total applicatiOT will be 
approximately 57 gallons 
of water per day for a 
l.OOO-square-foot garden 
as cwnpared to the recom- 
mended one inch or 625 
gallcms per week with the 
traditional system.. 



Auction 



You'll fuMl Kubota's L Series 
pcrfea for jraur mkl-size job. For all 
sorts of reasons. There arc many 
different modck to choose from. 
And with a 19 to 29 PTO horsepower 
range, there's one just right for you. 

They come equipped with 
fettutes you'd expect to find only on 
bi^ff, heavier midlines. Our L 
Series tractors are desigi^d for 
die farm, fwk and grouncfe 



mainttnance, landscaping, lig^t 
(XMKtniction and nursery work. 

With Kubou's L Sa^ 
tractors, you'll have no grounds 
fw complaint. 

IKUBOin 

We're looking for wori^. 



Stevenson Ford Tractor, Inc, 

nn S. MiUtary Hi^kwsy 
Chmpcate, Vir^nte 23320 

420-4220 



Sat., April 30, 1M3 - 10:30 A.M. 

Tools - Machinery - Lumber & Building Supplies 

ASHTON LEWIS 

4020-A McLean St. 
(bchiMl Tower Mall) 
Portsmouth, Va. 

2-5 Ton Rolling Floor Jacks, Kalamazoo Electic Metal Band Cutting Saw, 1 - 
285 AMP. P&H Electric Welder, Atlas Drill Press, Hanchett Band Saw Filer, 
2 - Large Bench Grinders, Large Motor Hoist, Electric Belt Sander, 20 - Assor- 
ted Hydraulic Jacks, 3 - Battery Charges, 5 HP. Shop Air Compressor, 15 - 
Metal work Benches, 15 - Rolls of New Barb Wire, 2 - 5 Ton Banett Rolhng 
Hydraulec Elevators, Atlas Model H Metal Uthe, Table Saw & Planner, 2 - 
Yates Lumer Planers (dresses on side) up to 6", Wood Working Talbe with 
Clam(», 25 - Wood Clamps, 5 - New Metal Lockers & Cabinets, marquette 10 
HP HMvy Duty Jump Starter, wood Pocket Machine, Wood Mortise 
Machine, WaU & Davenport Glue Machine, Wall & Davenport Deknotter 
Machine, 2 - Battery Chargers, Large Electric Fan. Electric Belt Sander, 1 - 
Lot of Electric Motors (W to 15 HP.), 2 - 20 HP. Wisconsin Air-Cool Motors, 
2 - Faffimnks Scales, Duro Jointer, Electronic Engine Analyzer, Metal MilUng 
MKhine (up to 6" cut), 1 - Lot of Galvanized Pipe Fittings (W to 3"), 1 - Lot 
of Assorted New BolU ('/4 to 7/8"), 1 - Lot of Assorted Tires & Wheels (New 
& Used), 1 - Lot of Assorted NaUs, Urge Truck Frame Drill Press. Dravo 
500 000 Floor Shop Heater, 8' Metal SUde-ln Livestock Body (New). Hectnc 
Metal Shaper, 2 - Racks of Assorted Steel (Cold Roll, Channel, Angle. Box 
Tube & Flat Bar), WO - New Windows & Sashes (Assorted Sizes), 50 - New 
Doors (HoUow Comb A Panel), 10 - Lots of Lumber (1" to 6" to 6x6 Pine & 
Cyi^eH), 1 - Lot of weathCT-beatten Cypress Lumber, 3 - Large Office Safes, 
10 - Office Desks, Chairs, Shelves & Credenzas, and Many, Many Other Items 
Too Numerous To Mention. . 

AUCnONEEB'S NCyTE: Mr. Lewis no longer has u» for the merchandise m 
this large wardiou». He has commissioned our firm to sell it WALL TO 
WALL. If you need any of the above items. DON'T MISS THIS AUCTION. 
EVERYTHING SELLS! Open for inspection Friday, April 29th, and mor- 
miv before sale time. TERMS: Payment in fuU must be made on all pur- 
diasses day of sale by Cash or Good Check. Lunch Available. Sale Rain or 
^iiK. Not R»ponsible for Accidents. 

F« Additional Information, Call or Write: 

JACK PEOPLES 

Bonded Auctioneer 

l340HradofRiv^R(Hui 

Chesapeake, Va. 23322 

804/421-2525 N.C.A.L. #151? 



Keep Cool Season 
Grasses Long 



Cool season grasses 
such as fescue shouldn't 
be cut short. 

Fescue should be kept 
about three inches high. 
This may require mowing 
about every five to 10 days 
during the best growing 
seasons-spring and fall- 
but the results will be wor- 
th the work. 

The lawn should be 
mow«l often enough so 
that no more than a third 
of the leaf surface will be 
clipped at one time. 

Don't mow the grass 
when the ground is wet 



enough to compact the 
soil or uproot the grass. 
This is particularly impor- 
tant tor recently planted 
grass because it is shallow 
rooted and the soil is likely 
to be soft. The young 
plants can easily be pulled 
from the ground by the 
mower if these conditions 
exist. 

Clippings should be 
removed from the lawn if 
they are heavy enough to 
mash down the grass or 
shade it. 

Recently planted grass 
needs to be watered during 
periods of dry weather. 



New Program Will 
Protect Waterways 



Governor Charles S. 
Robb has announced a 
new program that will 
piggyback on the USD A 
Payment-In-Kind (PIK) 
program and help protect 
Virginia's waterways from 
run-offs by planting per- 
manent vegetative buffers 
along streams. 

State farmers who are 
participating in the PIK 
program and located 
along streams in the 
watersheds flowing into 
the Chesapeake Bay and 
the Chowan River Basin 
would be paid for 
establishing 20-foot wide 
buffers, or protective 
filter strips, and main- 
taining them from three 
years. The payment per 
linear foot is 5 ccms for 
the first year and 2Vi cents 
per year for the remaining 
two years on the three year 
agreement. This is 
equivalent to about $200 
per acre. 

Robb said that 
Secretary of Commerce 
and Resources Betty J. 
Diener would have 
S500.000 available for the 
three year program, but 
the money would be 
distributed on a first- 
come, first-served basis. 
The program is to be ad- 
ministered by the Soil and 



Water Conservation 
Commission through Soil : 
and Water Conservation 
Districts. Individual far- 
mers' commitments to this 
program will be documen- 
ted through appropriate 
procedures with respective 
Soil and Water Conser- 
vation Commission 
through Soil and Water 
Conservation Districts. 
Individual farmers' com- 
mitments to this program 
will be documented 
through appropriate 
procedures with respective 
Soil and Water Conser- 
vation Districts. 

The placing of such 
land in filter strips is an 
approved Best 

Management Practice un- 
der the non-regulatory 
program of the State 
Water Quality 

Management Plan for 
Virginia. Extensive resear- 
ch has shown that the use 
of filter strips is an ex- 
tremely effective control 
for erosion and nutrient 
run-off. 

Virginia farmers par- 
ticipating in the PIK 
program have already 
enrolled 372,000 acres. 
Approximately 95 percent 
of this acreage is in the 
sensitive water areas 
which feed the 

Chesapeake Bay and the 
Chowan. 



-Events- 



April 

26 - Fast Foods - How 
nutritious are they? 10:00 
a.m.- 12:00 or 1:00-3:00 
p.m. Human Resource 
Center, Telephone 547- 
6349 to register. 
May 

5 • Home Repair CUnic, 
(electrical and plumbing) 
Indian River Community 
Center, 7 to 9 p.m. Call 
424-4238 to register. 

6 - 4-H Livestock Show 



- Princess Anne Farms 
Ltd. (formerly Princess 
Anne Stables) Show - 
12:30 p.m.. Sale - 7—00 
p.m. 

Virginia Cooperative 
Extension Service 
programs and activities 
are available to all people 
regardless of race, color, 
religion, sex, age, national 
origin, handicap, or 
political affiliation. 



N«w John Deere 
Rrar-Tlne Titer 




Big Mvp engine . . . 22-inch cut ... 
counlefrotating tines 

New Mm Dott! 820 tit*- f Oba 'c s*" ..^^ 
gaiMner* l<«ck l*m»<» a'*:! "n'Wy ope<aiwi M 
has a cemrmiciai-iioi 8 rp fig ne »nat22 
men wofkmg mOm Tne cou»«t«<«ai«ig !•"« 
mm low »>oH tnO tour long tfadw pe< spidtf 
do a SlOOd tots rt tming m m ««ig» na»« T»»i 
can alto M M« Iw ^tntOni t«a- - 

The iiMvy-duly ^ar fype M" ^ 

torwan) lpa«* pM m^'tt Ha 
cortM ptntf can Ba wung ^ ' 
you Insm Heading "" •«*'»y mita v,,- 

Sec M today to. a new «M T«f 

>. 
Princess Anne Equipment Corp. 

465) S.&HikrieM Blvd. 

Ciwia^eake. VA 2JI22 

(■M 421-2111 



f^mm 



^■■■■l 



■m 



16 Virainia Beach Sun. Aoril 27. 1983 



Farm, Lawn & Garden 



Herbal Hints 




Reducing Your Food Bills 



The rich and varied 
history of herby can only 
take second place to the 
actual experience of 
growing them. From the 
ancient brews and potions 
to modern culinary uses, 
herbs are unsurpassed in 
their versatility and prac- 
ticality. 

Just a few of the many 
modern uses are: 



To Enhance Foods 
Fresh and dried herbs add 
their wonderful fragrances 
and flavors to aU types of 
foods and drinks. 

To Fragrance The 
delights of sachets and 
potpourris are fast 
becoming a popular home 
craft principally because 
of the wide range of scents 
available from herbs. 
Many sachets will even 
repel unwanted moths and 
pests when placed in 
closets and drawers. 

Landscaping and Com- 
panion Planting The 
rediscovered art of com- 
panion planting deserves 
the attention of every gar- 
dner. When the right herb 
is planted with its proper 
"companion", bugs may 
be repelled or distracted 
by the scent. For example, 
sage may be planted next 
to cabbage to ward off 
cabbage moths, or tansy, 
a beautiful fern-like 
perennial, can be planted 
around the house to deter 
flying insects. With proper 
comfjanion phuitm^'it is 
possible to control thaetti ' 
without the use of 
poisonous or harmful 
sprays. Helix Herb Seed 
Packets contain planting 
to help you plan your gar- 
den. 



As with other plants, 
herbs can be divided into 
three categories. Annuals 
Jtaye a life cycle that lasts 
only one season and 
therefore must be replated 
from seed each year. 
Biennials will last two 
years producing flowers 
only in the second year. 
Perennials are long lasting 
plants that come up year 
after year from the same 
roots. Perennials are plan- 
ted in a permanent 
location where they will 
not be disturbed. 

Starting indoon 

Some herbs adapt well 
to being potted, others 
like to get a head start on 
spring by being started in- 
side and later transplat- 
ned. Which ever the case, 
most herbs like a warm 
place. 65 to 70 F (36-39 



C), and soil that is moist 
but not wet. Moisture can 
be controlled by a loose 
fitting plastic tent placed 
over the pots or flats. Be 
sure to maintain good air 
circulation, with holes in 
the plastic, to prevent 
moulding. Perennial herbs 
are usually slower to ger- 
minate so be patient and 
keep them warm and 
moist. Once up, keep your 
plants in a warm place 
with indirect sunlight. 
Graduatlly increase ex- 
posure to a fully lit 
location. Frequent turning 
of the pots will produce 
uniform growth. Many 
herbs such as chives, basil, 
and parsley are well adap- 
ted to indoor gardening 
and can be harvested all 
year round. 

Traosplanting 

Wait until danger of 
frost is past before moving 
yur herbs outside. Then, 
transplant after the second 
set of leaves are well for- 
med. Moisten the new soil 
and make a hole with a 
pencil. Loosen the soil 
around the roots with the 
pencil and gently lift out 
the plant by the leaf, (not 
the stem). Lift the plant 
into it's new location and 
firmly pack the surroun- 
ding soil. Protect the new 
plants from strong 
sunlight and give them 
plenty of water for a few 
days. 

StartlBg outdoors 

With proper care all 
herbs can 'be -started ou(- 
<dddfSi Make sure the soil 
is well worked and free 
from clods. A sand-soil 
combination on the sur- 
face will prevent crusting 
which inhibits sprouting. 
Gently water the soil and 
keep it moist but not wet. 
A straw or cheesecloth 
covering am be used to 
retain soil moisture before 
germination. Be sure to 
remove it as soon as the 
sprouts appear. Kmp the 
plants well weeded until 
established. 

Harvesting 

Although fresh herbs 
are an exciting taste treat, 
proper drying can yield 
tugh quality herbs whose 
pleasant fragrance will 
bring you thoughts of 
warm summer days in the 
garden. 

Harvest your herbs on a 
warm morning when the 
dew has dried but before 
the sun status hot. At this 
time of day your herbs will 
have a higho' oil content 
which gives them their 
flav(M- and aroma. 

Leafy Herbs should be 
cut a few inches above the 
ground just before flowers 



A - 



y^. , I 



8-,11-and16-hp 
John Deere 
Lawn Tractors 



Handle your mowing and 
bagging chores in one 
operation with a John 
Deere lawn tractor. 
Choose the 8-hp 108 with 
30-inch nnower; the 11 -hp 
111 or 1 1 1 H hydrostatic 
with 38-inch nnower. or 



the 16-hp 116 with 38- or 
46-inch mower. All have 
color-coded controls and 
adjustable padded seat 
Options include 
6'/? -bushel bagger, front 
blade, and snow thrower 
See us soon for 
a test drive 




open. Hang the herbs in 
loosely tied bundles or lay 
to dry on a screen. Keep 
the herbs out of direct 
sunlight, in a warm airy 
room. In humid climates 
good air circulation is 
essential for proper 
drying. When completely 
dried, one to two weeks, 
strip leaves from the stems 
and store in an airtight 
container in a cool, dark 
location. Some herbs, like 
basil, need to be dried 
quickly to retain 
maximum flavor and 
color. Spread them out in 
a low oven, about 1(X)° F, 
for a few hours until crisp 
to the touch. Then 
procede as above. The 
rewards of using freshly 
dried herbs is an experien- 
ce you and your family 
will enjoy season after 
season. 

Seeds are harvested 
when they ripen and begin 
to fall on their own. 
Carefully cut the seed 
heads and place in an old 
pillow case. Gently shake 
or rub the bag so the seeds 
will fall off the branches. 
Clean your seed by win- 
nowing in a gentle breeze 
or spreading the seeds on a 
tray and gently blowing 
away the chaff. Let the 
seeds dry and ripen a few 
days before storing. 

Be sure all your herbs 
and seeds are completely 
dry before storing. Check 
the containers a few days 
after filling for conden- 
sation on the sides. If you 
find any moisture remove 
the herb and dry com- 
pletely before storing. 

Freezing Many herbs 
can be frozen for later use, 
thereby maintaining their 
just-picked flavor. Wash 
the herb and air dry com- 
pletely before wrapping 
and storing the herbs in 
the freezer. Some herbs 
that freeze well are basil, 
chives, parsley, and mints. 



^i^-^-^ 



By Glen H. Mitchell 

Va. TecN ExtcMioa SpedaHtt 

Are you looking for a 
way to reduce your food 
bills? Do you ne«i a topic 
to discuss with your frien- 
ds and neighbors? Gar- 
dening allows you to ac- 
complish these goals and 
gain an appreciation of 
what farmers do at the 
same time. 

Gardening is a way to 
adjust the family budget 
to inflation. As there are 
fixed costs in the begin- 
ning for tools, fertilizer 
and seed, there is no 
guaranteed rate of return. 
Many persons garden for 
the exercise or feel that it 
is a way of expressirg 
creativity. 

Nine of every 20 U.S. 
households had individual 
gardens in 1982. If you 
add the individuals who 
interplant vegetables with 
flowers or have "tub" 
garden, the figure ris^ 
from 45 to 53 percent of 
the households that 
produce some food. 

Vegetable gardening in- 
creased dramatically in 
recent years as inflation, 
food prices and the search 
for exercise increased. 
Twenty-seven percent of 
the people garden to save 
money while a like num- 
ber do it to obtain better 
tasting produce. Others 
comment on the 



psychological rewards. 

Reportedly, the average 
garden produces between 
$470 and $530 m produce. 
Remember, these are tax 
free dollars. Tomatoes, 
sweet corn, lettuce, 
onions, cucumbers, green 
beans, squash, zucchini, 
carrots, cucumbers, 
radishes and peas are the 
most popular crops. 

Gardening is quite 
complex to many of us, 
but we find it an ideal way 
to excercise and get out- 
doors. We find that we 
have to learn new terms, 
such of intercropping, soil 
testing and natural 
pesticides. 

The novice gardener can 
turn to the local Extension 
agent for information. He 
or she-will be happy to tell 
you about soil tests and 
what plants are suitable in 
your area. 

The Extension agent is a 
rich source of information 
on what can be grown 
locally and the gardening 
methods that should be 
followed. 

Be sure that the site you 
select is well drained and 
gets plenty of sun. Plan 
what you are going to 
plant and when. You may 
want to do some inter- 
cropping or crop rotation. 

The beginning gardener 
should think small. A 20 x 



Student Shortage 
Reflected 




Marjoram 



A steady erosion of 
enrollment in U.S. 
colleges of agriculture sin- 
ce 1978 now is reflected in 
shortages of scientific and 
professional personnel, ar 
U.S. Department of 
Agriculture research of- 
ficial said today. 

Terry B. Kinney, Jr., 
■administrator of USDA's 
Agricultural Research 
Service, forecast an an- 
nual need for 59,780 new 
graduates in agriculture 
betwMn now and 1985. 
Despite opportunities for 
employment, annual 
projections are for only 
51 ,976 graduates, he said. 

"We urgently need 
higher education training 
of young people in the 
food and agricultural 
sciences," Kinney said. 
The need will increase in a 
world that looks to the 
United States for help in 



feeding a burgeoning 
population, he said. 
Current enrollment 
. declines follow an upsurge 
of .s^tudent interest bet- 
ween J 970 and 1978 when 
majors in agriculture at 
many colleges nearly 
tripled. But that expan- 
sion thrived because of the 
"baby boom" era that 
began in 1946 along with 
that generation's strong 
interest in environmental 
issues, according to Kyle 
Jane Coulter, director of 
the research agency's 
higher education 

programs. 

Coulter helped prepare 
a new report, "Graduates 
of Higher Education in 
the Food and Agricultural 
Sciences: An Analysis of 
Supply/Demand." Citing 
from the report, she said 
the available pool of 
college-bound students is 



Evergreen Garden Center 

Last Weekend of 

Gift of Spring Sale 



Chesapeake Rent All, Inc. 

1000 Great Bridge Blvd. 
547-9244 




ORTHO 

Rose & Flower 




Insect Killer 

*FmI Klion 

•Apply any IIbc tiiiriag growlag tcasos 

•Noitdimc 

•IUiliapUdi,wUte-fHM, 

bcelks, lnrho|>pcn 

Reg 4.79 
NOW 2.79 Tomato Cages 
(1.79 with rebate) Reg. 1 .29 

Now99« 



Ready to Use 
ORTHO 

WEED-B-GON 

Weed KiUer 

wMds-foelt aad 

dl'^aa^HMi, drick^rccd, ipw|e. oiafc, 

plHlaia, wM oaioB uid 

otkerliMcdwMrfs. 



Your authorized STARK 
BROS. Fruit Tree Center. 
Good selection of Fruit 
Trees now available 




Reg. 4.98 
NOW 2.99 

(1.79 with rebate) 




MNUWPCM 

KLEENUP® 
READY— TO— USE 
Weed & Gran Killer 

•CMVicte kM of ro^ aid 
te|Hla2lo4wtda 

Reg. 4M 
NOW 2.39 

(1.79 with rebate) 



1900 KEMPSVILLE ROAD 
VIRGINIA BEACH, VA 

467-7022 



30-foot garden can grow 
more than many realize. 
Select vegetables that you 
and your family members 
enjoy and start with plants 
that grow easily, such as 
tomatoes, beans, com and 
lettuce. 

Be cautious of mail or- 
der advertisements that 
offer too-good-to-be-true 
plants. Avoid the climbing 
vine strawberries and 
peach trees that will bear 
enormous fruit as they of- 
ten are more exaggeration 
than fact. It is best to buy 
at local and well-known 
nurseries. 

If you must buy one of 
these "astonishing" plan- 
ts, take a few minutes to 
check with your Extension 
agent as to their history of 
growing in the area. 

While talking about 
gardening and the yard, be 
cautious of mail order ads 
which describe trees that 
grow to great sizes in a 
short time. Often, these 
trees are very fragile and 
will break in the first high 
wind. 

Before you sign a con- 
tract, check with the local 
Extension agent, your 
local Better Business 
Bureau and some satisfied 
customers . No legitimate 
business will mind having 
the customer make such 
checks. 



Gypsy Moth: 
Caterpillar Look 
Alikes 

The gypsy moth is one of many insects that feeds on 
leaves of shade and ornamental trees. Unfwtunately, 
with ail the. publicity and attention the gypsy moth has 
received many people may jump to the conclusion that 
many insects they see are the gypsy moth. There are 
several «her local species of caterpillars which many 
may think to be the gypsy moth - Eastern Tent 
Catepillar, Forest Tent Caterpillar, Fall Cinderworm, 
Orangestriped Oakworm, Tussock Moth C:aterpillar and 
Fall Webworm, etc. Each of these have definite 
identifying characteristics which are true to the species. 
No two different insect species have the same 
ch^rflctcristics 

The important characteristics of some of the insects 
are mentioned below: 

Characteristics 

•Young caterpillars (Va" - Vi") are brown to smoky 
brown, with black shiny heads. When caterpillars reach 
Vi" or loiger they have orange marks on their back. 

•Mature caterpillars are charcoal gray, hairy (dark 
hair) with distinctive pairs of 5 blue and 6 red spots on 
their back and are I'/j - 2" in length. Heads change to 
dull cream ot yellow in cc4ot with dark lines. 

•Caterpillars emerge in late April or early May and 
feed thru mid-June/early July. 

•Gypsy moths never make a tent or webbing in the 
tree, but young caterpillars hang frran a silken thread 
only early in the season (late April-early May). 

•Caterpillars, blackish, are IVi - 2" marked with 
brilliant colored stripes of red and blue with light 
colored Spots on their bodies. They have a prtMiiinent 
white stripe down the middle of their backs. 

•Caterpillars make tents or webbing in the crotches 
of trees in April, especially wild cherry, apple and 
crab apple. 

•Caterpillars hide inside the tents during the evening 
and depart to feed on leaves during the day. 

•Caterpillars have soft tan hair and do not grow from 
knob-like tubercles as do the gypsy moth caterpillars. 



shrinking further, with 25 
percent fewer high school 
graduates projected for 
1991 as compared with 
1978. ; ' 

Coulter said the short- 
age of high school 
graduates is further com- 
pounded by the dispropor- 
tionate numbers of food 
and agricultural 

professionals who began 
their careers after World 
War II. These 

professionals now are 
becoming eligible for 
retirement. 

"One of the cfitical 
problems the nation must 
face within the next 10 
years is the emerging shor- 
tage of professionally 
trained agriculturists. We 
must address and remedy 
this issue while there is still 
time," Kinney said. 



ROACH & WATERBUG 
PROBLEMS? 

WE HA VE THE SOL UTION 



ROACH PRUFE 

NO.l 

IN UNIVERSITY TESTS 



ALSO 
KILLS 
ANTS& 
SILVERFISH 




m 

SENTirr. 



•Easy to apply 
•Odorless, non>evaporating 
•Non-staining, non-flamniaUe 
•Sticks to bup-they carry 
it back to hidden bap! 

CREEKMORE HARDWARE 

1303 BAINBRIDGE BLVD., CHESAPEAKE 
545-5332 

IF IT'S HARDWARE WE HA VE IT 




FINE SELECTION OF SHADE 
AND FLOWERING TREES 

ROSES reg. $7.25 NOW $5.95 



Complete Selection of Vegetable Plants 

annuals and perrenials 

Ready for Planting to 

give Summer Color. 



99C to $3.50 



Now Open On Sundays 
10 AM -6 PM 





PHONE 547-1880 



334 BATTLEFIELD BLVD. N. 

( I Mi. $«ilh of Chesapeake General HospiuJ) 

HOURS: MON.-SAT, 8-6 
SUN. 10^ 



■■■ 



■■ 



■■ 



Virginia Beach Sun. April 27, 1983 17 



Virainia Beach Public Notices 



il»Mtei I 



raNKHMnN( 



PiABc Nmi to| 



appear on the agenda: 
REGULAR AGENDA: 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

1. Appeal from Decisicms of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordi- 
nance, Subdivision for Una M. Lunsford. ft-operty 
located 150 feet Southeast of Woodhouse Road, 1000 
feet more or less East of Alanton Drive, and known as 
1422-A Woodhouse Road. Plats with more detailed 
infimnation arc available in the Department of 
Hanning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

2. i^peal from Excisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to (^rtain elements of the Subdivision Odi- 
nance. Subdivision for Russell B. Davis. Property 
located on the South side of Quail Point Road, 1 180 feet 
east of Covey Street. Plats with more detailed 
informaticm are avulable in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

3. ^peal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Odi- 
nance. Subdivision for Sea Breeze Farm, Inc. Property 
located at the Nwtheast intersectioi of West Little 
Neck Road and Little Neck Road. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in the Department (rf 
Wanning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZOMING CLASSIFICATION: 

4. An Ordinan(% upon Application of Runnington 
Investment Corp., for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT ClASSIFICATION from A-1 Apartment 
District to B-2 Business District on certain priqxrty 
located at the Southeast comer of Laskin Roed and 
niillip Avenue, running a distance of 97.5 feet along 
the East side of Laskin Rood, running a distance of 

133.06 feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a 
distance of 21.16 feet in a Soitherly direction, running 
a distance of 117 feet along the Southern property line 
and running around a curve in a N(»thwesterly 
directicm a distance of 156.72 feet. Said parcel contains 
10,018.8 square feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance uocm Aoolication of Multi Zcmed 
Properties, a Limited Partnership, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Com- 
munity-Business District to A-2 i^ariment District on 
certain prqperty located on the East side of South 
Lynnhaven Road beginning at a point 40 feet mc^e or 
less South of Silina Drive, ruiming a distance of 260 feet 
along the East side of South Lynnhaven Road, running 
a distance of 600 feet along the Southern prc^rty line, 
running a distance of 600 feet along the Eastern 
prq^eriy line and running a distance of 500 feet along 
the Northern property line. Said parcel contains 5 
acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Application of Newtown Plaza 
Assoc., a Limited Partnership, fcff a CHANGE OP 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Com- 
munity-Business District to A-2 i^artment District on 
certain property located on the South side of Baker 
Road beginning at a pdnt 680 feet East of Newtown 
Rood, running a distance of 1148.86 feet along the 
NcBthem property line, running a distance of 540 feet 
TAoft (a less along the Eastern pr(^rtyline,jutining a 
cfistance of 1238.36 feet alaig the SaiHienTprt^rty 
line, running a distance of 293 feet in a Northeasteriy 
direction, running a distance of 63 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction and running a distance of 513 
feet in a Northeasterly direction. Said parcel contains 
16 acres mwe ot less. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon implication of Bissett Realty, 
Inc.. for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSI- 
CATION from R-4 Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District cai the Northwest corner^of N.Great Neck Road 
and N. Lakeside Drive oi Lot t Section 1, Eastwood 
Manw. Prq)erty located at 1345 N. Great Neck Road 
and contains 13,504 square feet. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Application of Mmmo Comer 
Corporation for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-3 Residential District to R-5 
Residential District on certain property located c» the 
South side of Princess Anne Road beginning at a pdnt 
1200 feet mwe or less West of Oceana Boulevard, 
running a distance of 2^)0 feet mcH-e or less along the 
South side of Princess Anne Road, running a distance 
of 3322.50 feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a 
distance of 2219.30 feet in a Northeasterly dir^tion, 
running a distance <rf 758 feet in a Northwesterly 
directioi and running a distance of 1171.50 feet in a 
Northeriy directiai. Said parcel contains 103 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

OONDmONAL USE PERMFTS: 

9. An Ordinance upon Application of Geraldine 
WoodfaU 4br a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
hone occupation (day care) on certain property located oti 
the north skle of I9th Street beginning at a point 200 fed 
East of Mediterranean Avenue, running a distance <rf 
50 feet along the North side of 19th Street, running a 
distance of 140 feet along the Eastern piapeny line, 
running a distance of 50 feet along the Northern 
in-openy line and ruiming a distance of 140 feet along 
the Western property line. Said parcel is located at 511 
1 9th Street and contains 7,000 square feet. VIRGINLA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon Application of Francis E. 
Pritchard, Jr., for a CONDmONAL USE PERMTT for a 
single family residemx in the AG-1 Agricultural 
District on certain property located 600 feet East (rf 
Blackwater Road b^inning at a point 2696 fwt South 
<rf West Gibbs Road, running a distan« of 873.73 feet 
along the Northern property line, running a distance erf 
442.42 feet along the Eastern property line, running a 
distance of 828.15 feet along tl« Southern property line 
and running a distance of 300 feet along the Western 
prt^rty line. Said parcel amtaim 6.5 acres. BLACK- 
WATER BOROUCM. , ^. 

11 An Ordinate upon AM)li<»twn <rf Kunmel 
Automotive Inc.. T/A Tread Quarters, for a CONDI- 
TIONAL USE reRMTT for mounting and balandi^ 
tires an certain property located at the Southeast comer 
(rf Hdland Road awl Diana Lee Drive, nunii^ a 
distance of 361.79 feet along the South side of Diana 
Lee Drive, runninga distance <rf 386.90 feet along the 
Eastern property Une, running a distance of 374 feet 
along the Southern property line, running a distance of 

305.07 feet along the East side <rf Holland R«d "» 
running around a curve a distance of 43.36 feet. SaKl 
^cel contains 3.197 acres. PRINCESS Af®4E BOR- 

CXXjH 

12 An Ordinance upon Application of Burlage 

CorporaUon for a O^IDmONAL USE reRMTT for a 
temporary parking lot on certain property located on 
the East side of Atlantic Avenue beginning at a pant 55 
feet North trf 8th Street runnii« wUstanca ot 250 feet 
akms the East side <rf Atlantfc Avenue, running a 
distMce of 150 feet along The Nortl»ra property Une, 
runiMng a distance ot 250 feet along the Eastern 



prq;>erty Une and running a distance erf 150 feet along 

the Southern property Une. Said parcel contains 37,500 

square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed informatin are available in the 

Dei»rtment <rf Planning. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Robert J. Scott 

LMrector of Planning 

197-9 2T 5/4VB 

NOTICE OF PUBMC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the Gty Council of Virginia 
Beadi will be heard in the Council Chambers of the Gty 
HaU Buildins, Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday, May 16, 
1983, at 2:00 p.m. at which time the foUowing 
ai^Ucations will be heard: 

CHANGE Of ZCWING DISTRICT CLASSmCATION: 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

1 . An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Herbert A. and 
Carolyn A. Culpepper for CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from AG-2 Agricultural 
Disrict to B-2 Community Business District on certain 
property located on the West side of Princess Anne 
Road beginning at a point 490 feet South of Seaboard 
Road, running a distance of 155.25 feet along the ^t 
side of Princess Anne Road, running a distance of 352 
feet along the Southern property Une, running a 
distance of 150.70 feet along the Western property line 
and ruiming a distance of 388.26 feet sdong the 
Northern property Une. Said oarcel contains 1.17 acres. 
PRINCiESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUCM: 

2. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Ann Landis 
Fitzgerald for a OONDmONAL USE PERMTT for a 
private schod/State Ucensed day care center on the 
Northwest comer of Chester Street and Waverly Drive 
on Lot 27, Section 1, Westmoreland Estates. Said 
parcel contains 9,931.68 square feet. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT OASSBFICATION: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Application of Herbert A. 
Culpepper, Cardyn A. Culpepoer and F.O. Powers for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-8 Residential District to B-2 Community 
Business District on certain property located at the 
Southeast corner of Virginia Beach Boulevard and 
Oceana Boulevard, mnning a distance of 213.10 feet 
along the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
running a distance of 135 feet along the Eastern 
OToperty Une. running a distance of 213.10 feet along the 
Southern prqjerty hne and running a distance of 135 
feet along the East side of Oceana Boulevard. Said 
parcel c<mtains 28,033 square feet. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

CONDmONAL USE PERMTT: 

LYZNHAVEN BOROUGH: " 

4. An Ordinance upon ^pUcation of Herbert A. and 
Carolyn A. Culpepper and F. O. Powers for a condi- 
TIONAL USE PERMTT for a self service gas station on 
certain property located at the Southeast corner of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard and Oceana Boulevard, 
running a distance of 213. 10 feet along the South side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, running a distance of 135 
feet along the Eastern property Une, running a distance 
of 213.10 feet along the Southern property Une and 
running a distance of 135 feet along the East side of 
Oceana Boulevard. Said parcel cmtains 28,033 square 
feet. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon ^plication of Stephen Payne 
Cole, Mary Payne Jett Cole and David Fauber for a 
CONDmCHMA ISE PERMTT for a duplex on the South 
side of Pinewood Drive, ^)4.73 feet East of Mediter- 
ranean Avenue on Lots 9 and 10, Block 5, Rnewood. 
Said parcel contains 5,150 square feet. VIRGINLA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of J,» G & R 
Enterprises for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMTT for a 
tempwary parking lot on certain prqjerty located at the 
Northeast corner of Atlantic Avenue and 30th Street on 
Lots 1 thru 6, Block 73, Virginia Beach Development 
Coip. Said parcel contains 1.03 acres. VIRGINL\ 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of John W. Vakos 
for a C(MMDm<»lAL USE PERMTT for a bicycle rental 
in conjunctkn with the Oceanfront Inn on property 
located at the Northeast comer of Atlantic Avenue and 
30th Sueet on Lots i thru 6, Block 73, Virginia Beach 
Development Corp. Said parcel contains 1.03 acres. 
VIRGINIA BEACH BOHLOUGH. 

SUBDIVISI<»I VARIANCE: 

8. Appeal frops Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordi- 
nance, Subdiviswn for Stuart Held. Property located on 
the Northwest comer (rf Atlantic Avenue and 18th 
Street. Plats with more detailed information are 
available in the Department <rf Hanning. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUCM. 

Hats with more detailed informatioi are available in 

the Department d nazming. 

AU interested persons are invited to attend. 

fbith Hodges Smith 

197-11 2T 3/4 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia BoK^ Board of Zoning Appeals wiU con- 
duct a PuUk Heariii« on Wednesday. May 4, 1983, at 
7:30 p.m., in the CcMincil Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
11» staff Meft^ wiU be at 6:45 p.m., in the City 
Manager's Confo'ence Room. 1be foUowing ap- 
pUcations will ufpeai on the agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

1 . Vinant J. Mastiacco, Jr. and Preston M. White, Jr., 
requ»ts a variance of 10 feet to a ^ foot setback from 
tht east propmy Um insmd of 30 feet as required of a 
setb«;k adji^t to the Atlantic Ocean and of 2 feet to 6 
foot side yard setb«:k (both sid«) inutmi of 8 feet e«;h 
as required and of 2 feet in buildii^ Iwight to 37 feet in 
height instoui of 35 fwt in buiUing height as aUow«l on 
Lot4and Nortterohalf of Lot 5. Block 7, Plat of Cape 
Henry. 8404 Oceanfront. Lynnhaven Borou^. 

2. M . J . RcMrins requests a variaiK» of 4 fe^ to a 6 foot 
side yard KtbKk (weat ade) UMtewi of 10 feet as 
r«|uir«d Qnd M«y atUitkHi) cm L<ms 6, 8 and 10, Block 
41. Shadcwtewa H«i^its, "^ Goldsboro Avenue. 
Virpmi Bach BntN^. 

3. Jm^ N. Hawa reqiMsu a variaiK» of 5 fe^ to a 15 
foot skk ^rd setl^:k (wet side) instead of ^ feet as 



"In bi 



NMkHMriiif 



PMMcRMriRf 

required and ol 4 leet m building height to 39 feet in 
height instead of 35 feet in building height as aUowed on 
Lot A, Linkhorn Shores, Duke of Windsor Road. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

4. Calvin R. Flowers requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 
foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required 
(swimming pool) on Lot 2. Block 13, Section 1, Princess 
Anne Plaza, 3405 South Plaza Trail. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

5. Robert and Prudence E. Templeton requests a 
variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot side and rear yard setback 
(southwest corner) instead of 10 feet each as require 
(swimming pool) on Lot 17, Forest Park, 1856 Timber- 
wood Lane. Lynnhp^en Borough. 

6. John R. Savino and Mary H. Savino requests a varian- 
ce of 10 feet to a 5 foot side yard setback (south side) 
and of 7 feet to an 8 foot rear yard setback (west side) 
instead of 15 feet each as required (swimming pool) on 
Lot 7, Section 3, Greenhill Farm, 2076 Thomas Bishop 
Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

7. Runnington Investment Corporation requests a 
variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot setback from both 
Mediterranean Avenue and Norfolk Avenue instead of 
10 feet each as required and of 10 feet to a "0" setback 
from the west property line instead of 10 feet as required 
and to allow parking in the setback from Pinewood 
Drive, Mediterranean Avenue and Norfolk Avenue, 
where prohibited uid to waive the landscaping in the 
setbacks from the streets where required on Lots 17 
through 22, Block 8, Pinewood, Pinewood Drive and 
Mediterranean Avenue. Virginia Beach Borough. 

8. Campus East Associates requests a variance of 20 feet 
to a "0" rear yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
on Lot 1, Block RR, Section 2, Campus East, 5557 
Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

9. Campus East Associates requests a variance of 20 feet 
to a "0" rear yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
on Lot 2, Block RR, Section 2, Campus East, 5559 
Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

10. Campus East Associates requwts a variance of 20 
feet to a "0" rear yard setback instead of 20 feet as 
required on Lot 3, Block RR, Section 2, Campus East, 
5561 Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

11. R. G. Moore Building Corporation requests a 
variance of 15 feet to a 5 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 20 feet as required (deck) on Lot 1, Block B, Section 
1, Campus East, 5681 Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

12. R. G. Moore Building Corporation requests a 
variance of 15 feet to a 5 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 20 feet as required (deck) on Lot 2, Block B, Section 
1, Campus East. 5683 Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

13. R. G. Moore Building Corporation requests a 
variance of 3 feet to a 17 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 20 feet as required (treUis over patio) on Lot 3, Block 
B, Section 1, Campus East, 5685 Campus Drive. 
Bayside Borough. 

14. R. G. Moore Building Corporation requests a 
variance of 15 feet to a 5 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 20 feet as required (deck) on Lot 4, Block B, Section 
1, Campus East, 5687 Campus Drive. Bayside Borough. 

15. The Church of Jesus Christ of Utter-Day SainU by 
Daniel C. Dills requests a variance of 22.5 feet to a 7.5 
foot setback from Masters Avenue instead of 30 feet as 
required (sateUte antenna) on Parcel B, Section 2, Kem- 
psville Meadows, 4784 Princess Anne Road. Kempsville 
Borough. 

16. Cedric M. Johnson requests a variance of 3 feet to a 
5 foot side yard setback (west side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (2nd and 3rd floor addition) on Lot 12, Block 8 
and 9, Ubermeer, 218 58th Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

17. Steven F. Shames requests a variance of 5 feet to a 5 
foot rear yard setback instead of 10 feet as required 
(swimming pool) on Lot 10, Fairfield Meadows, 700 
Walton Wve. Kempsville Borough. 

18. John N. Lupton requesu a variance of 6 feet to a 14 
foot rear yard setback instead of 20 feet as required 
(patio cover) on Lot 16. Section 1, Hollygrier. 346"' 
Waltham Circle. Princess Anne Borough. 

19. Robert L. and Patricia M. Yoder requests a variance 
of 10 feet to a 5 foot side yard adjacent to a street 
(Cypress Avenue - unimproved) instead of 15 feet as 
required on Lots 2 and 4, Block 45, Shadowlawn 
Heighu, Cypress Avenue and High Point Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 

1. Helen L. Foos requests a variance of 2 feet in fence 
height to 6 feet in fence height instead of a 4 foot fence 
as aUow«l in a r«iuircd front yard setback on Lots 1 , 2, 
11 and 12, Block 15, Croatan, 752 S. Atlantic Avenue. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

2. John W. Thornton requests a variance of 9 feet to a 1 
foot side yard setback and of 5 feet to a 5 foot rear yard 
setback (northeast corner) instead of 10 feet each as 
raiuired (storage shed) on Lot 7, Block A, Great Neck 
Manor, 2212 Harbor Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

3. Sam Arrington requests a variance of 10 feet to a 10 
foot front yard setback instead of M feet as required 
(residential addition on Lou 20, 21 and Western half of 
Lot 19,) North Virginia Beach. 208 76th Street. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

4. Runnington Investment Corporation by Pandell 
Builders, Inc. requesU a variance of 5 feet to a 65 foot 
building separation instead of 70 feet as r«|uired when 
prindpal structures are separated by a common uipess, 
egress and of 5 feet to a 15 foot side yard separation 
between buUdings not separated by a common ingress, 
egress instetui of 20 feet as required and of 12 feet to an 
8 foot setback from the south property Une instewl of 15 
feet to a 5 foot setback from Laskin Road instead of 20 
feet each as required and of 5 fwt to a 5 foot setback 
from the cast propaty Une instead of 10 f«t as r«iuired 
and to aUow the parking spaces to be 9 fwt by 18 f«t in- 
stead of 9 feet by 20 feet as required (townhouse con- 
dominium ptoject) on Lou A & D, Property of W. B. 
GaUup, Birdneck Acres, 1221 aiwl 1233 Laskin Road. 

Lynnhavai Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST APPEAR BEFORE THE 

BOARD. 

Garland L.IsdeU 

Secretary 

195-13 4/27 VB . 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
Vi^nia: 

T1» regular meeting of the Gty Coundl of Virginia 
Boudi wiU be hou^d in the Coundl Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, Prini^ Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia on Monday. May 9. 
1M3, at 2:00 p.m. at which time the fidlowing ap- 
l4ici^<Nis wiU be t^rd: 



CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION: 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Application of Newiown 
Developers. A Virginia General Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to R- 
8 Residential District on certain property located 209 
feet North of Connie Lane beginning at a point 520 feet 
more or less East of Lawrence Drive, running a distance 
of 313 feet along the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 409.18 feet along the Eastern property line, 
funning a distance of 315 feet along the Northern 
property Une and running a distance of 397.5 feet along 
the Western property Une. Said parcel conuins 1.6 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Application of Pickett Road 
Associates. A Virginia General Partnership, for, a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 Residential District to R- 
8 Residential District on certain property located on the 
East side of Lawrence Drive beginning at the Eastern ex- 
tremity of Daniel Smith Road, running a distance of 20 
feet along the East side of Lawrence Drive, running a 
distance of 509.56 feet along the Southern property line, 
running a distance of 310.12 feet along the Eastern 
property line, running a distance of 281.30 feet along 
the Northern property Une, running a distance of 294.20 
feet along the Western property line and running a 
distance of 228.28 feet in a Westerly direction. Said par- 
cel contains 2 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of Joseph J. Basgier 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 Residential District to A- 
2 Apartment District on certain property located on the 
West side of Pleasure House Road beginning at a point 
400 feet North of Lake Bradford Lane, running a 
distance of 100 feet along the West side of Pleasure 
House Road, running a distance of 305 feet along the 
Northern property Une, running a distance of 120 feet 
more or less along the Western property line and run- 
ning a distance of 350 feet along the Southern property 
line. Said parcel is located at 2333 Pleasure House Road 
and contains 30,492 square feet. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMITS: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon AppUcation of John C. Aspin- 
wall for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for mini- 
warehouses on certain property located 260 feet South 
of Shore Drive beginning at a point 850 feet more or less 
West of Independence Boulevard, running a distance of 
120 feet along the Northern property Une, running a 
distance of 225 feet along the Western property Une, 
running a distance of 120 feet along the Southern 
property Une and running a distance of 225 feet along 
the Eastern property hne. Said parcel contains 27,000 
square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Apjrfication of GaUway Freewill 
Baptist Church for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a group home (weekend use for military personnel) 
on certain property located on the South side of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard beginning at a point 520 feet more or 
less West of Toy Avenue, running a distance of 60 feet 
along the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, run- 
ning a distance of 413.10 feet in a Southwesterly direc- 
tion, running a distance of 1%.80 feet in a North- 
westerly direction, running a distance of 213. 1 3 feet in a 
Northerly direction, running a distance of 217.28 feet in 
a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 1310.63 
feet along the Western property line, running a distance 
of 864.82 feet along the Southern property Une, running 
a distance of 1226.38 feet along the Eastern property 
Une, running a distance of 160 feet in a Northwesterly 
direction, running a distance of 225.41 feet in a South- 
westerly direction, running a distance of 146 feet in a 
Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 200.41 
fwt in a Northerly direction, running a distance of % 
feet in a Northwesterly direction and running a distance 
of 212.69 feet in a Northerly direction. Said parcel con- 
tains 25 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCES: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

6. Appeal from Decisions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elements of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Floyd Swartz, WiUiam H. Barba and 
James L. MiUigan. Property located on the Southeast 
side of Lakeview Drive, 1050 feet more or less South- 
west of Bromfield Avenue. PlaU with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

7. Api^ from Dedsions of Administrative Officers in 
regard to certain elemenu of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Wilder Enterprises. Property located 
on the South side of Virginia Beach Boulevard, East of 
Groveland Road at 3177 Virginia Beach Boulevard. 
PUu with more detiuled information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

8. Appeal from Dedsions of Administrative Officers m 
regard to certain eleoMnU of the Subdivision Ordinan- 
ce, Subdivision for Iva I. Bowman. Property located at 
the Eastern extremity of Glen Arden Road. Plats with 
more detaUed information are available in the Depart- 
ment of Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
PlaU with more detaU^I information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
AU interested persons are invited to attend. 
Ruth Hodges &nitb 
CityCterk 
195-1 12T 4/27 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
FOR 
RECONSIDERATION 
CHANGE OF ZONING, Margaret R. Mills and Gar- 
phiiw E. Smith From R-6 Residential District to A-1 
Apartmoit £)istrict Bayside Borough 
Cta A|»il 1 1 . 1^3. the Virpnia Beach City Council took 
action upon the (^dinance granting a change of zoning. 
M stated above, in the ^^ioition of Margaret R. Mills 
aiMl Garphine E. Smith. wMdi. by lotion of Virginia 
Beach City Coundl on April 18, 1983. will be RECON- 
SIDERED at the regular City CouiKil meting in the 
City of Virginia BeKh. Vi^inia. Mtmday. May 2, 1983, 
at Two O'clock in the afternoon. 
Ruth Hodge Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
197 2T 4/27 VB 



mmm^^^rnKms^^^^^smm 



wmnmrnm 



18 Virginia Beach Sun, April 27, 1983 



Viroinia Beach Public Notices 



NbNeHMring 



PHble HMring 



■ IWIIC NMiriRI I 



Public HtariRf 



PuhUcHtarim | | Nbiic Htarim 









Public Notice 
On February 23, 1983, 
Brian J. Friedman filed 

with the Federal Com^ 
munications Commission 
an application for con- 
struction permit for a new 
commercial television 
station on Channel 43 to 
be licensed to Virginia 
Beach. The station will 
operate with 3008 kw of 
power at an antenna 
height of 846.5 feet. The 
transmitter will be about 1 
mile south of Driver, 
Virginia. The main studio 
will be within the city 
limits of Virginia Beach. 

The applicant is a sole 
proprietor. The ap- 
plication is available for 
public inspection during 
library hours at the 
Virginia Beach Public 



Library, Main Branch, 
Virginia Beach. 
195-8 3T 4/25 VB 



LEGAL NOTICE 
Take Notice that on May 
13, 1983 at 10:00 a.m. at 
the premises of Tidewater 
Imports, Inc. 3152 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
23452, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, 
for cash, reserving unto it- 
self the right to bid, the 
following motor vehicles: 
1982 AMC Spirit; Serial 
#1AMBM4304CK171286; 
1981 Honda 4 Dr. Sdn., 
(CJHMSM542XBC1 38988. 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
F. C. Rice-Comptroller 
199-1 1T4/27VB 



NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Planning Commission will hold a 
Public Hearing on Tuesday, May 10,1983. at 12:00 
Noon in the Council Chambers of the Qty Hall 
Building, Princess Anne Courthouse, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. A briefing sessi<m will be held at 9:30 a.m. in 
the Planning E)epartment Conference Room, (^ra- 
tions Building. PLANNING COMMISSION ACTION IS 
NOT A FINAL DETERMINATION OF THE APPUCA- 
TION, BUT ONLY A RECOMMENDATION TO THE 
CITY COUNCIL AS THE VIEWPOINT OF THE 
PLANNING COMMISSION. FINAL DETRMINATION 
OF THE APPUCATION IS TO BE MADE BY CTTY 
COUNCIL AT A lATER DATE, AFTER PUBUC 
NOTICE IN A NEWSPAPER HAVING GENERAL 
CIRCUIATION WITHIN THE CITY. The foUowing 
applications will appear on the agenda: 
DEFERRED 60 DAYS BY PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON MARCH 8. 1983: 

1. Application of Thoms C. Shubert, Jr., and Jane K. 
Shubert for the discontinuance, closure and abandon- 
ment of a porticxi of Lauderdale Avenue beginning at 
the Western boimdary of Velzy Avenue and running in 
a WesteriydirecticH) along the Southern boundary of Lots 
17, 18, 19, and 20, Block 16, Chesapeake Park. Said 
parcel cwitains 6764.2 square feet. BAYSIDE BOR- 
ROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upcm implication of Lynnhaven North 
Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from I-l Light Industrial District to 
B-2 Community District on parcels on the West side of 
Lynnhaven Parkway, North of Avenger Drive. 
PARCEL 1: Lxated 589.97 feet West of Lynnhaven 
Parkway begimuag at a point 1300 feet mcnre or less 
North of Avenger Drive^ running a distance of 1412.09 
feet along the Northern property line, running a 
distance of 634.43 feet along the Western property line, 
running a distance of 134.68 feet in a Southeasterly 
direction, running a distance of 190 feet in a 
Northeasterly direction, running a distance of 217.51 
feet in a Southeasterly directicm, running arcxind a 
curve in a N(»'theasterly direction a distance of 655.90 
feet and running a distance of 300 feet in a Northerly 
direction. 

PARCEL 2: Located 1732.50 feet West of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 250 feet more or less 
NOTth of Avenger Mve, running a distance of 365 feet 
alcmg the Southern property line, running a distance of 
357.81 feet long the Western pr(^rty line, running a 
distance of 209.23 feet in an Easterly directi<»i, running 
a distance crf215 feet in a Scmtherly direction, running a 
distance of 165.71 feet in an Easterly direction and 
running a distance of 84.35 feet in a Southerly 
direction. 

PARCEL 3: Located 399.99 feet West of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a point 250 feet more (x less 
North of Avenger Drive, running a distance of 1111.16 
feet along the Southern property line, running a 
distance of 547.70 feet alaig the Western property line, 
running a distance of 386.94 feet along the Northern 
property line, running a distance of 504.13 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction and running a distance of 
172.16 feet along the Eastern prc^rty line. Said 
parcels contain 24.2538 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOR- 
OUGH 

3. An Ordinance up<Mi Applicaticm of Lynnhaven Nrath 
Associates for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 Community-Business ESs- 
trict to I-l Light Industrial District cm parcels located 
West of Lynnhaven Parkway, North and Saith of 
Avenger Drive, and on the East side of S. Lynnhaven 
Road, North of Homespun Avenue. 

PARCEL 1: Located m the West side of Lynnhaven 
Parkway beginning at a prant 243.99 feet Nwth of 
Avenger Drive, running a distance of 399.99 feet along 
the Northern prc^rty line, running a distance of 239.71 
feet along the Western prqjerty line, running a 
distance of 77.36 feet in an Easterly directicm, running 
a distance of 210 feet in a Northeriy directicm, running a 
distance of 175 feet in an Easterly directirai, running a 
distance of 188 feet in a Southerly directicm, running a 
distance of 155 feet in an Easterly direction and running 
a distana; of 243.99 feet more or less along the West 




A Year Of 
Celebrations 

Virginia Beach 



side of Lynnhaven Parkway. 

PARCEL 2: Located on the West side of Lynnhaven 
I^kway beginning at a point 498.10 feet South ot 
Avenger Drive, running a distance of 705.76 feet along 
the Southern property Hne, running a distance of 73.97 
feet in a Northwesterly direction, running around a curve 

in a Northeasterly directiwi a distance of 1100 feet 
more or less and running a distance of 498. 10 feet alcmg 
the West side of Lynnhaven Parkway. 
PARCEL 3: Located cm the East side of S. Lynnhaven 
Road beginning at a point 100 feet more or less North of 
Homespun Avenue, running a distance of 914.35 feet 
alcmg the East side of S. Lynnhaven Road, running a 
distance of 544.30 feet in an Easteriy directicm, running 
a distance of 408.89 feet in a Southerly direction, 
running a distance of 165 feet in an Easterly directicm, 
running a distance of 170 feet in a NcM-therly direction, 
running a distance of 200 feet in an Easterly directicm, 
running a distance of 238.89 feet in a Northerly 
directicm, running a distance of 221.35 feet in an 
Easterly direction, running a distance of 172.30 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 65 feet in 
a Westerly direction, running a distance of 3%.65 feet 
in a Southeriy direction, running a distance of 120 feet 
in an Easterly direction, running a distance of 166.11 
feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 
100 feet in a Southerly direction and running a distance 
of 979,46 feet along the Southern property line. Said 
parcels contain 24.2536 acres. LYNNHAVEN AND 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGHS 
REGULAR AGENDA: 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

4. An Ordinance upon Apphcation of Mary I. Ramus for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from B-2 Community-Business District to B-4 Ftesort 
Ccmimcrcial District on certain property located on the 
South side of Bayside Road beginning at a point 390 
feet more or less East of Ellis Avenue, running distance 
of 85.12 feet along the South side of Bayside Road, 
running a distance of 132 feet in a southeasterly 
direction, running a distance of 84.42 feet alcmg the 
Ncffthwest side of Shell Road and running a distance of 
171.40 feet in a Northwesterly direction. Said parcel 
contains 13,288 square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

5. An Ordinance upon Application of C. Gordon Oliver 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION frcmi R-6 Residential District to A-2 Apartment 
EMstrict on certain property located 360 feet North of the 
Northwest intersection of Haygood Road and Aragcma 
Boulevard, running a distance of 752.1 feet along the 
Eastern property line, running a distance of 507.04 feet 
along the Northern property line, running a distance of 
%1.91 feet along the Western prc^rty line and 
running a distance of 410 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel contains 8.19 acres. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

6. An Odinance upon Application of C.Gordon Oliver 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION from B-2 Comriiunity-Business District to A-2 
Apartment District on certain property located 200 feet 
North of the Northwest intersection of Haygood Road 
and Aragona Bcmlevard, running a distance of 165 feet 
along the Eastern property line, running a distance of 
160 feet along the Northern property line running a 
distance of 165 feet along the Western property line 
and running a distance of 160 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel contains 26,400 square feet. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

"7. An Ordinance upon Application of C.Gordon Oliver 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICA- 
TION frcmi R-6 Residential CSstrict to B-2 Community- 
Business District on certain property located on the 
North side of Haygood Road beginning at a point 160 
feet West of Aragona Boulevard running a distance of 
250 feet alcmg the North side of Haygood Road, running 
a distance of 199.86 feet along the Western property 
line, running a distance of 250 feet along the Northern 
property line and running a distance of 200 feet along 
the Eastern property hne. Said parcel contains 1.14 
acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH _,,^. ^ „ „ 

8 An Ordinance upon Application of White and Hon 
^sociates II for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from AG-1 Agricultural EXstrict to 
R-8 Residential District on certain prc^rty located at 
the Western extremity of Grey Fox Lane, running a 
distance of 1450 feet more cm- less along the Eastern 
prc^crty line, running a distance of 1252 feet along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 1185.36 
feet along the Western property line and running a 
distance of 1009.58 feet along the Northern property 
line. Said parcel ccmtains 36.568 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH 

9. An Ordinance upon Application of Bernard B. and 
Patricia C. Dudginski for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-2 community- 
Business District to R-8 Residential District on certain 
prc^crty located <m the West side of Ccrflins Avenue 
beginning at a pcMnt 400 feet mcffe or less North of 
Bonney Road, running a distance of 70 feet alcmg the 
West side of CcriUns Avenue, running a distance of 120 
feet along the NcM-them property line, running a 
distance of 70 feet along the Western prc^erty line and 
running a distance of 120 feet along the Southern 
property line. Said parcel contains 8,400 square feet. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

10. An Ordinance upcm /^plicaticm of William R. 
Collier and Danny L Collier for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from B-1 Busi- 
ness-Residential District to A-1 Apartment District cm 
certain property located on the South side of Hermitage 
Road beginning at a point 250 feet mcM-e or less East of 
Pleasure House Road, running a distance of 400 feet 
mcM-e (X less alcmg the South side of Hermitage Road, 
running a distance of 265.17 feet alcmg the Eastern 
prc^rty line, running a distance of 527.75 feet along 
the Southern property line and running a distance of 
289.95 feet along the Western property line. Said parcel 
ccmtains 2.7 acres. BAYSIDE BOROUGH 

11. An Ordinance upcm y^plicaticm of J.F. and Macie 
Helton and William D. and Wanda C. Richards fw a 
CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to O-l Officx District on 
certain property located at the Southeast comer of 
Prcwidence Road and Kempsville Road, running a 
distance of 154.73 feet along the South side of 
Providence Road, running a distance of 187.83 feet 
along the Eastern property line, running a distance of 
1 184.42 feet along the Southern prc^rty line, running 
a distance of 154.53 feet alcmg the East side of 
Kempsville Road and running around a curve a 
distance of 45 feet. Said parcel is located at 5165 and 
5161 R-ovidence Road and contains 33,802.56 square 
feet. KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

12. An Ordinance upcm Applicaticm fof Oc^ansidc, Ltd., 
and Esther Erhardt Snyder Jac(*son for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION from R-6 



Residential District to B-2 Community-Business I>is- 
trict cm certain prc^rty located cm the East side of 
Kempsville Road beginning at a pcMnt 600 feet South cS 
Indian River Road, running a distance of 200 feet along 
the East side of Kempsville Road, running a distance of 
500.26 feet alcmg the Southern prcq)erty line, running a 
distance of 159.14 feet along the Eastern prc^rty line 
and running a distance of 576.59 feet along the 
Northern prc^erty line. Said parcel contains 2.06 acres. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH 

13. An Ordinance upon Application of E. Kenneth Day 
and Jahn Wallace Summs, Agents for Henry Oay 
Hofheimer III, Edward A Hofheimer and Marie A 
Mansback for a CHANGE OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSLFICATION from R-1 Residential District to R-3 
Residential District on certain prc^rty located on the 
East side of Kline Drive beginning at a point 1305.01 
feet East of the intersection of Harris Road and Kline 
Drive, running a distance of 215 feet more cm- less along 
the East side of Kline Drive, running a distance of 180 
feet in an Easteriy directicm, running a distance of 730 
feet in a Northeasterly direction, running a distance of 
811.50 feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a 
distance of 134 feet in a Northeasterly direction, 
running a distance of 867.13 feet in a Southeasteriy 
directicm, running a distance of 1765.49 feet in a 
Southeriy directicm, running a distance of 295.60 feet in 
a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 123.40 
feet in a Northerly direction, running a distance of 654 
feet in a Westerly directicm. running a distance of 475 
feet in a Northwesterly directicm, running a distance of 
455 feet in a Westerly directicm of 355 feet in a Wcsteriy 
direction, running a distance of 260 feet in a 
Southwesterly directicm, running a distance of 540 feet 
in a Northwesteriy directicm and running a distance erf 
1231.74 feet in a Ncfftherly direction. Said parcel 
contains 104.6 acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

14. An Ordinance upon Applicaticm of Ann Landis 
Fitzgerald for a CONDmONAL USE PERMIT for a 
private school/State licensed day care center on the 
Northwest ccM-ner of Chester Street and Waverly EWve 
on Lot 27, Section 1, Westmoreland Estates. Said 
parcel contains 9,931.68 square feet. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH 

15. An Ordinance upon Application of Mary I. Ramus 
for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT to cerate a home 
for adults on certain prc^rty located on the South side 
of Bayside Road beginning at a point 390 feet more or 
less East of Ellis Avenue, running a distance of 85.12 
feet along the South side of Bayside Road, running a 
distance of 132 feet in a Southeasterly direction, 
running a distance of 84.42 feet along the Nc»thwest 
side of Shell Road and runnning a distance of 171.40 
feet in a Northwesterly direction. Said parcel contains 
13.288 square feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upcm Applicaticm of The Virginia 
Beach congregaticm of Jehovah's Witnesses fcM' a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a church on certain 
property located on the Northeast side of Pritchard 
Road beginning at a pcMnt 600 feet more <x less 
NcM-thwest of Hermes Street, running a distance of 480 
feet more or less along the Northeast side of I^tchard 
Road, running a distance of 574.84 feet along the 
Northern property line (South side of Virginia Beach 
Toll Road), running a distance of 100 feet in a 
Southeasterly direction, running a distance of 118 feet 
in a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 160 
feet in a Southerly direction, running a distance of 100 
feet in a Southeasterly directicm, running a distance of 
100 feet more or less in a Southwesterly direction, 
running a distance of 237 feet in a Northwesteriy 
direction and running a distance of 125 feet in a 
Southwesteriy direction. Said parcel ccmtains 3.11 
acres. LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon Application of Harbour 
Enterprise, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a temporary parking lot on certain property located 
on the East side of Atlantic Avenue beginning at a pcnnt 
255 feet North of 20th Street, running a distance of 100 
feet along the East side of Atlantic Avenue, running a 
distance of 150 feet alcmg the Northern prc^rty line, 
running a distance of 100 feet along the Eastern 
property line and running a distance of 150 feet along 
the Southern property line. Said parcel contains 15.000 
square feet. VIRGINL\ BEACH BOROUGH. 

18. An Ordinance upcm Applicaticm of Lynn Beach 
Associates for a CONDITIONAL l^E PERMIT for 
mini-warehouses on parcels located at the Northeast 
and Northweast comers of Cape Henry Drive and Kleen 
Street. 

PARCEL 1: Located at the Northeast comer erf Cape 
Henry I>ive and Kleen Street, running a distance of 
175.3 feet along the Notth side of Cape Henry Drive, 
running a distance of 240.34 feet along the Eastern 
prc^rty Hne, running a distance of 159.4 feet along 
the Northern prc^rty line and running a distance of 
240.34 feet along the East side of Kleen Street. 
PARCEL 2: Located at the Northwest comer of Cape 
Lfcnry Drive and Kleen Street, running a distance erf 
167.24 feet along the North side of C^pe Henry Drive, 
running a distance of 222.66 feet alcmg the Western 
prc^rty line, running a distance of 182.07 feet along 
the Northern prc^rty line and running a distance of 
222.66 feet along the West side of Kleen Street. Said 
parcels ccmtain 1.8 aceres. LYNNHAVEN BORCXJGH. 

19. An Odinance upon Application of Daniel C. Lake 
for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a duplex on 
certain prc^rty located on the Ncrth side of 10th Street 
beginning at a point 60 feet West of Cypress Avenue, 
running a distance of 60 feet along the North side of 
10th Street, running a distance erf 100 feet along the 
Western property line, running a distance erf 60 feet 
alcmg the Northern property Une and running a distaiux 
erf 100 feet alcmg the Eastern property line. Said pvcel 
is located at 705 and 707 10th Street and contains 6,000 
square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH BOROLKjH. 

20. An Ordinance upcm Application of Rena A Black fcMT 
a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for a home occupation 
(exercising) cm the West side of Lotus I>ive, 500 feet 
North of Sandbridge Road on Lot 12B, Ljotus Qu-den 
Farms. Pre^rty located at 1429 Lotus Drive JUJd 
contains 1.056 acres. PRINCES ANNE BOR(XJGH. 
STREET CLOSURES: 

21 . An Ordinance upon Application erf Blajac Associ- 
ates, Inc., T/A TTie Aquarius Motel Apartmenu fejr a 
OCMOmONAL USE PERMIT for bicycle rentab on 
certain property located cm the East side of ^lantic 
Avenue beginning at a point 55 feet South <rf 20th 
Street, running a distance of 150 feet along the East 
side of Atlantic Avenue, running a distance erf ISO feet 
akmg the Southern property Une, running a distance of 
150 feet along the Esstem property line and running a 
distance of 150 feet along the Northern prc^rty line. 
Said parcel is located at 1909 Atlantic Avenue aiKi 
contains 22,500 square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 



BOROUGH. 

22 An Ordinance upon Application of Bellamy Manor 
Preschool by Janet Kottke for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a private schoerf on certain property located 
on the South side of Providence Ro«i beginning at a 
point 550 feet more or less West of Luke Drive, running 
a distance of 215 feet along the South side of 
Providence Road, running a distance of 890.79 feet 
along the Western property line, running a distance of 
215 feet along the Southern property line and running a 
distance of 891.06 feet along the Eastern property line. 
Said parcel contains 4.4 acres. KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 

23. An Ordinance upon implication of George Lee, T/A 
Economy Tire Center for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for an automobile repair esublishment and 
sales and servicing of tires on the North side of NTirginia 
Beach Boulevard. 140 feet more or less East of Firet 
Qrfonial Road on Lots 3. 4, and 5, Block 5, Oceana 
Gardens. Parcel is located at 1638 Vu-ginia Beach 
Boulevard and contains 21,617 square feet. LYNN- 
HAVEN BOROUGH. 

24. An Odinance upon ApplioUion of E. Kenneth Dav 
and Jahn Wallace Summs, Agents for Henry Clay 
Hofheimer. Ill, Edward A Hofheimer and Marie A 
Mansback for a CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for open 
space promotion on certain property located on the East 
side of Kline Drive beginning at a point 1303.01 feet 
East of the intersection of Harris Road, and Kline 
Drive, running a distance of 215 feet more en- less along 
the East side of Kline Drive, running a distance of 180 
feet in an Easteriy direertion. running a distance of 730 
feet in a Nextheasterly direction running a distance of 
811.30 feet in a Southeasterly direction, running a 
distance of 134 feet in a Northeasterly direction, 
running a distance of 867.13 feet in a Southeasterly 
direction, ruiming a distance of 1765.49 feet in a 
Southerly direction, rimning a distance of 293.60 feet in 
a Northwesterly direction, running a distance of 123.40 
feet in a Northeriy direction, running a distance of 634 
feet in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 473 
feet in a NcMthwesterly direction, ranning a distance of 
433 feet in a Westerly direction, running a distance of 
123 feet in a Nexthwesterly direction, running a 
distance of 355 feet in a Westerly direction, running a 
distance of 260 feet in a Southwesterly direction, 
running a distance of 340 feet in a Northwesterly 
direction and mnning a distance of 1231.74 feet in a 
Northerly direction. Said parcel ccmtains 104.6 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

25. /^plication of Bruce B. Mills for the disccmtinu- 
ance. closure and abandonment of a portiem of Dutch 
Street beginning on the West side of North Palm 
Avenue, running a distance of 36 feet along the 
Southern property line, running a distance of 51 .75 feet 
along the Western property line, running a distance of 
20 feet alexig the Northern property line and running a 
distance of 50 feet along the Eastern property line. Said 
parcel contains 1,424.5 square feet. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

26. Application of Lyim Beach Associates, a Virginia 
General Partnership, for the discontinuance, closure 
and abandonment pf pe^ions ofJKIeen Street and Cape 
Henry Drive. 

KLEEN STREET: Beginning at the Northern boundary 

of Cape Henry Drive and miming in a Northerly 

directin a distance of 220 feet. Parcel is 60.19 feet in 

width. 

CAPE HENRY DRIVE: Beginning at a point 160 feet 

more or less East of Jade Street and running in an 

Easterly directicm a distance of 402.53 feet along the 

Northern boundary of Cape Henry Drive. Parcel is 25 

feet in width. Said parcels contain 23.305 square feet. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

AMENDMENT: 

27. Motion of the Planning Commission of the Qty of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
6. Section 613(a) and 633(a) of the Ctmiprehensive 
Zcming Ordinance pertaining to minimum lot area in 
the A-2 and A-4 Apartment Districts. More detailed 
information is available in the Department of Planning. 

28. Motion of the Planning Commission of the CSty of 
Virginia Beach. Virginia to amend and reordain Article 
5. Section 564(a) of the Comprehensive Zoning 
Ordinance pertaining to off-street parking regulations 
in the R-7 Residential District. More detailed 
information is available in the Department of Planning. 

29. Motion of the Planning Commission of the Gty of 
Virginia Beach. Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
9, Section 935 of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to off-street parking requirements in the B-4 
RescM^t Commercial EHstrict. McM^e detailed information 
is available in the Department erf Planning. 

30. Motion of the Planning Commission of the Qty of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and reordain Article 
15, Section 1503(d) of the Comprehensive Zoning 
a-dinance pertaining to off-street parking require- 
ments in the C-1 Arts and Cemferenw District. More 
detailed infexmatiem is available in the Department of 
Planning. 

PUits with mcM-e detailed informatiem are available in 

the Department of banning. 

All interested persons are invited to attend. 

Revert J. Scott 

Director of Planning 

loy.in ?,T 5/4 VB 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
On May 9, 1983. the Virginia Beach City Council wiU 
hear: 

An Ordinance vacating and clc»ing Poplar Lane and a 
portion of Spmce Lane shown on that certain plat en- 
titled, "Resubdi vision of certain lots or |»rcels located 
in BIcKk A. replat a Rudee Heights, Lyimhaven 
Borough - Virginia jeach, Virginia," dated March 22, 
1M3, a e»py of which is on file in the City Attora^'s 
Office, by vacating a portion of that plat entitl^, 
"Rq)]at of Rudee Hdghts, Princess Anne Co., VA," 
Dat^ December 1950. in Map Book 63, at page 46. -^ 
Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
197-12 2T 5/4 VB 

NOTKE OF PUBUC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Banning Commission will herfd a 
Public Hearing on Thursday, May 12, 1983, at 9:00 
a.m. in the Council Chambers of the Qty Hall Builcling, 
Princess Anne Courthouse, Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
PLANNING (DOMMBSION ACTION B NOT A FINAL 
DETCRMINATIN OF THE APHJCATION. BUT ONLY 
A REa»lMENDATIC»^ TO THE CTTY OOUhOL AS 
THE VIEWPOINr OF THE PLANNING OOMMB- 
Stati. FINAL DETERMINATTN OF THE APPUCAr 
TION IS TO BE MADE BY CITY COUNCIL AT A 
LATER DATE. AFTER PUBUC NOTKE IN A 
NEWSPAPER HAVING CENERAL ORCUIATION 
wnHD^ THE CTTY. The foilowing apfrfieations wiU 



■BHBBBBV 



Virginia Beach Sun, April 27, 1983 19 



Classified Ads 




SEALED BIDS are being takeii 
for the sale of 1 Metal Lathe, I 
BeiKh Grinder, I Crane. All 
items may be inspected %t I74S 
Acorn Sireel, Chesapeake. VA. 
8:30 - 5:00, Monday thrwigh 
Friday. Bids may be submitted 
for single or multiple purchases. 
The Authority reserves the right 
to award bids on single or 
multiple purchases. Bids will be 
opened on May 2, 1983, at 2:00 
p.m., at the Authority's Central 
orrice located at 1417 BattleHeld 
Blvd., Greenbrier 1, Suite 115, 
Chesapeake Redevelopment and 
Housing Authority 547-4567. 

^ I2T4-27 

JUNK CARS - Wreck<^ or run- 
ning cash-free towing. We also 
buy used radiators and batteries. 
7 days a week. Call 487-9222 or 
after 6 p.m. 857-6670. 



c 



ATTENTION MILITARY - E^ 

to E-9: Dental Plan, Champus 
Aid, discounts on stereos, autos. 
Low rate auto, life insurance 
through NCOA Membership. 
Pete Schuhl.USN (RET) 463- 
6690. 

24T4-27 

CREDIT PROBLEMS? Receive 
a mastercharge or Visa, guaren- 
teed. Nobody refused. For free 
borchure send self addressed 
stamped envelope to Credit 
Data, Box 271084, Dallas, Texas 
75227 or call anytime 214-324- 
5944. 2 TFN 



SEARS &LOWBUCKS 

Coins - Jewelry - Collectables 
Antiques - Herb Jones Prints 

GOLD - SILVER BOUGHT & SOLD 

5939 E. Va. Beach Blvd. 

alJANAF-Open7Days 

iBddc Deborah's Flea Market 

461-9778 



SUPnVALUIt 

Round-Trip Fare 

Rome $499. 

Athens $499. 

TelAviv $6». 

Uffla $S99. 

Sydney $99 

And Many More 

Worid Charters 

(804)583-0409 

Hours: 10 a.n.-5:30 p.ia. 




GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Homes & Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 

333 Prnvidence Rd. 



CALL 464-9317 




us pm*r*CAKm 

/UNr cMty Mmml ^ Uiii Ma MuH ■■ 
MlHi« iKaraMt. M Ml pM. Um MC<1 
■MSE HESIIUlf »ii wut ■*> IriaHk 

■««n> MM. *mi JMK TwrunffiiK: 

rmvttM uM nK riMht H tt,t IW i|MI 
UMaaKoa.* 



jid?gliiLltteiglWl.iK««» 



4.ltertM 



CARS SELL FOR Sltl.tS 

(avCTarr). Also Jeeps. 1^ (Urec- 
tory caU 805-687-6000 EaO. 3453. 

44T$-U 

AUn • INI SMS . AD ofNiMit. 
24,000 Miles. Like new. »,S00. 
Call 484-75 14. 

4 IT 4-27 

OATSUN . 1971. 510. 4 dr. 
sUtion wagon. Four speed, ex- 
cellent condition, SI. 200. CaU 
482-3677 or 482-2028. 
4 IT 4-27 



tO.IMp«Mtad 



A-1 Paving 

Spring Special 
25(^0 Discount 

Driveways, Parking Lois, Seal 
Coaling, Sidewalks and Patch- 
work. Black Top Only. Free 

Estimates 

460-4079 



Renew Your Bath 

Or Kitchen 

With ceramic tile set in con- 
crete or adhesive. 

2S years experience 

LeroyMinerTBeCo. 
482-3198 



WANTW 

TO BUY 

SCRAP 

cop»pn 

A BRASS 

CALL 
Joe M. Decker 
Company, Inc. 
622-19S0 

2300 Moatk^o Ave. 
Notfolk,Va. 




k.8X 22 IHff eft Bam 

$795.00 

Leasing Terms Available 

STATE LINE BUILDERS 

Garages • Utility Barns • Any Size 

I?"!:;^ 1^2795* JIM LEWIS 

Moyock, N.C. 279M /•L^.a'ji »«* 

(919)43MU» Home: (S04) 421-2506 

When Something Needs 
Building or Repairing, You Need 

BLACK 
BROS. 

Home Improvement 
Specialists 

•Building Contractc»r-Roofs«Cafports»Garages 

•Bath Remodekd'RoOTJ Additions 

•Aluminum Sidinp^Kitcbw Renwdtf ng 

g45-7318 Hugh E. Hack, Sr. 







ta.NBl»WMrtai 



n.UimkUiim \ 



DemUCT ^ALES EXECUn\ ES 

For the Va., Tidewater area. Nat- 
ional nrm expanding its sales 
operations. Seeking .experienced 
sales person for new service to 
business owners. 

Earn $20,000-530,000 
Realistic 1st yr. comm. 
Future management oppor- 
tunities available. 
Call weekdays 9-S, 1-800-638- 
S8S0 

10 2T 4-27 

WRITE YOUR 
OWN PAYCHECK 
Are you tired of the same old 
routine? Are you worth more 
than you're paid? Well, it's time 
to step up. We are looking for 
dynamic and aggressive men and 
women with talent to deal with 
the public. If you feel you have 
these qualirications, call: 299- 
1437 between 9 a^m. and 4 p.m. 
for appointment. Ask for Amy. 

10 4T 5-11 

EXCELLENT INCOME for 
part time home assembly work. 
For information call 504-641- 
8003 Ext. 7699 
10-4T-5/4 

SALES • Entry level position 
with New York Stock Exchange 
firm. Call Mr. Salzberg at 627- 
8549. 

104TS-1I 



S AUS4ffiWAIID YfWRSELF 

Top podtions beii« filled in 
Tidewater and surrounding 
areas. Wwkly pv/, commissiMi, 
car allowance, monthly bonuses. 
Good working conditions. Wwk 
In your area. Be home every 
n^ht. Have the support of a SO 
year old company. Opportunity 
for advancement. Training 
period with pay. No previous 
sales experience necessary. Must 
have your own car and phone 
and be over 21. Call HUFF 
COOK at 483-3310 
10-5/4 

SALES-ATTENTION! Last 
year we were the largest 
distributors for interstate 
engineering in the world and 
we're still growing. We need key 
people to help us continue our 
expansion program. Complete 
training program and rapid ad- 
vancement. No experience 
necessary, but must have leader- 
ship potential. For personal in- 
terview call 463-7625. 
10 TFN 

COUNSELLING/SALES - The 

non-commissioned and petty of- 
ficers association is in need of 
resident counsellors in the local 
ara. Contact Mr. Soloman. 499- 
9878. 
10 TFN 

ATTENTION LADIES - Under- 
cover Wear Home Lingerie Par- 
tiers. Have a party or become an 
agent. Call Belina - 422-1408: 
Penny - 423-1840 or Sandy - 245- 
8764. 

10 4T 4-27 

TELEPHONE SALES - Mor- 
ning hours, salary and bonuses. 
No experience necessary. We 
train. Great for students and 
housewives. Call 627-1999. 

10 TFN 

MANAGER TRAINEE - Ap- 
plications are noM being accep- 
ted for manager trainee position. 
We offer good money and good 
future. For interview call 463- 
7624. 
104TTFN 

SALES-STREAM OF SUCCESS 

Stop looking for those 8 to 4 jobs 
that get you nowhere. Our com- 
pany is offering a chance to work 
your own hours and make 
unlimited earnings. Contact Mr. 
Gibson. 855-2373. 
__^ 104T5-I1 

TRAVEL - Hiring today 10 
sharp enthusiastic Guys and Gals 
17 or over. No experience 
necessary as we train toward a 
rewarding future. A.I.M. Don't 
delay caH today. Ms. j^andt 425- 

1151. 

10 IT 4-27 



EXTENSION AGENT - Sum- 
mer positions in Home 
Economics and Horticulture to 
answer consumer questions by 
phone: Degree required. Apply 
to Va. Cooperative Extension 
Agriculture Department, 
Virgiiiia Beach. Va. 23456 or call 
427-4769 for ap^ication. Ap- 
l^ications wiU be excepted until 
May 4, 1983. An Equal Oppor- 
tuntiy and Affirmative Action 
Employer. 
10 IT 4-27 

PART TIME - Saks, need stit- 
chery luvers with desire to earn 
extra income. No deliveries, 
training. Call 486-6317. 

10 4T 4-27 



WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE • 

Any major appliances. Call 547- 

4050. 

15414-27 

WASHERS, Dryers, Ranges. 
REfrigeraiors. Reasonable rates. 
Call 460-451 2. 

15 TFN 



16.ArtlclMFM-Salt 



LANDSCAPING SERVICE - 

Lawn and Garden restoration, 
grading and seeding. Free 
Ktimates. 421-7350. 

^____ 28 TFN 

LANDSCAPING AND LAWNS 
Professional jobs. None to small 
or large. Free esuimatcs. Call 
622-3546. 

294T5-I1 



H hitrartiwfHwatlin 



111 PMiwaa WiatN 



AZALEA PLANTS - Three and 
four year old healthy plants. Call 
547-3895. 
16 IT 4-27 

FOR SALE - Like new! SCM 
manual typewriter with case. 
Call 482-5284. 5:30 p.m. to 9 
p.m. Table seats $15.00. 

16 IT 4-27 



32. BiiriiMss For Rant 



STCHIES AND STORAGf areas 
- All siites. Properties unlimited. 
Marvin Goldfarb. 399-8390, 484- 
1275. 

32 TFN 



BOOKKEEPING SERVICE • 

Prefer small proprietorship. 
Discount on first month: Bowers 
Hill area. Call 48g-7908. 

394T5 II 

SPRING SPECIAL! 
All wells drilled for $75.00. All 
worit guaranteed. Call 397-9139. 

394T5-II 

PLASTERING - Experienced, 
ail kinds, small or large jobs. 
Also hang wall-boards and do all 
kinds of cement work. Free 
estimates. Call 853-5774 

39-4T-S/3 



PIANO TEACHER: Your home 
or mine. Music Degree. 10 years 
experience. All levels, all ages. 
Before 3 p.m. and after 7 p.m. 
Call 588-5535 
48-4T-5/4 



51. 



MALE PRACTICAL NURSE 

with 10 years of experience in 
hos|Htal and hqme nursing with' 
referentxs certified and licensed. 
Working hours negotiable. 
Phone 625-7093. 

II IT 4-27 

HAS AVAILABLE restaurant 
WHkoi in all categories: Cooks, 
waiters, bus boys, and also 
seafood processors. If interested 
call 703-941-1649 or write Unico 
inc. 1849 Massachusetts Ave. 
McLean. Va. 22010. 

II 4T 5-18 

EXPERIENCED Man and Udy 
willing to do cleaning; clean 
vacant apartment buildings, yard 
cleaning, work as companion, do 
day work. Call 622-0792. 
11414-27 

NURSES AID licensed for 
geriatrics. Full time or part time. 
Own transportation. References 
available. Call 397-4771 

I1-4T-5/4 

SHUT-INS, WORKING 
mothers or treat someone special 
to a ibampoo set, hair cut, per-, 
manent wave, in your home. Call 
545-3277 
11-4T-5/4 

GENERAL HOUSE Cleaning 
reliable and experienced. Call 
340-1389. 1 1 TFN 



17. 



33. ApartHMiits Far Rant 



FINE WOOD REIIMSHING - 

Repairs, touch-ups, restoring an- 
tiques. Ask for B. J. Can be 
reached just after 5 p.m. Call 
424-3330. 

"i-7 4T5-ll 

FURNITURE REFINISHED ■ 

Why buy new? Free pick-up and 
delivery. Free estimates. Price 
most reasonable. 424-4899. Also 
quality upholstery work. Call 
467-%84. 

17 4T 4-27 



GREEN RUN • In Virginia 
Beach. Apartments for adults. I 
and 2 bedroom Garden Style and 
2 bedroom townhouses. We pay 
heat and hot water. The Pines. 
Call 468-2000. 

33-TFN 

APARTMENT HEADQUAR- 
TERS - Great Bridge. 4 
locations, one and 2 bedroom 
apartments. From $260. Rental 
office, 482-3373, evenings 482- 
1492. 369 Johnstown Road. 

33 TFN 



II. Antifiits 



36.Ra8lEstata 



HOLLINGSWORTH Antiques: 
Fine imported English Furniture, 
stained glass, and collectables at 
affordable prices! Open daily 10 
to 6. Call 625-6525. 

18 4T 5-18 

ANTIQUE STOVE - Wood/coal 

stove. Good condition. Call days 

ai 547-4571 after 6 call 485-4684. 

18 TFN 



24.Waiitad 



To lay J 



12. BmiiMSS Opportmiity 



STEVENSON FORD 

TRACTOR 

420-4220 

SPRING SPECIALS 

SH"MckHra» ttf* 

«Vi"OtelHinm $4*5 

U-PlM S»5 

I4"n»i> S315 

C«<t SCC4 PiHMr t2fS 

3 r<M Hlldi Ahnlw $3*1 

CmiitliM M" Rulwy Mower S4*S 

HafdM TIMLT WMuy Cmitr HM 

Hw^M Tin IManr Caller SIM! 

OPEN SAT.8-12 




r 



SALES 

NATIONAL MAKKETINC HRM 

Has Opening Available 

For Two Ambitious 

Distributors In A 

MIIHon Dollar 
Record Industry. 



IDEAL... 

For Fiwd-Raisii^ 

Direct Saks 

Mailorders, 

Airf Phone Siies. 

TIME IS MONEY 

CALL US TODAY 

JACK CLARK 

214-234-3254 

Dallas, TX 



1 



ATTENTION: Flea Market 
Dealers! Buy at wholesale and 
below wholesale. Independent 
Sales. 1616 Meadowlake Dr. 
Norfolk, or call 857-4004. 

12TFN 

OPPORTUNITY exists for 
progressive person to become a 
swimming pool dealer. You can 
operate out of your home and 
earn between 5,000/15.000 pcr^ 
summeri Protected terriiwies.-i 
Call or write Sunshine Pools,- 
Box 243, Bedford, Va. 24523. 
Tel: 703-586-5577. 
12 IT 4-27 

BLUE AND GREY Flea- Market 
- Inside and outside spaces. 
Grand opening specials on out- 
side tables. 2640 Nevada Ave., 
Norfolk. Call 853-9521. Open 
Friday, Sat. and Sun. 
124-27 

STAR OF THE SEA SCHOOL 

Flea Market - Sat. May 14th 10- 
7:30. Sun. May I5lh 9-2. Rem 
indoor table now. $13.50 both 
days oi $10.00 Sat. only. Call: 
428-4953 or 481-1568. 

12414-27 



CASH PAID - VirKinia Beach 
Antique Co. pays cash for an- 
tiques, old furniture, clocks, 
glassware, lamps, china, oil pain- 
tings, oriental rugs, old iron and 
antique toys. We buy one piece 
or entire housefulls. Also, good 
used furniture. Call 422-4477 
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. 

24 TFN 

WE NEED COINS - Stamps- 
Gold-Silver-pocket watches- 
usable jewelry. Anything related. 
Call now-top dollar. CASTLE 
COINS AND STAMPS, 1 107 S. 
Military Hiwy., next to Toy 
Castle, 420-2646 
24-4T-5/3 

TABLE SAW • Prefer carbide 
blade. Will pay cash. Call 627- 
502 08 - ' p.m. Ask for Lisa. 



25.6oadTMiigtTaEat 



EARL SMITH OYSTERS - 

Across from Hurd Setfood 
Restaurant. Shucked in own 
natural jucies. By quarts, pints, 
or bushels. Call 340-5171. 

25-TFN 



27. fiaraf a/Yard Saias 



13.Pttt 




CaU 489-7661 

AO*oiH< ttmit-a 

USA 

VA Mill 

•WDW-C^cM. tmmU^ 

Si«I.M4M.U 

S.C. .^ 

riT-Min9a.M(. m 



4SU omit An., NwMk. V*. 139M 



KITTENS - I black and white, 
calico, 3 tabbies, male and 
female. No charge. Call 587- 
6332. 

13IT4-27 

CAGES • Custom wrought iron. 
Lei your creativity become 
reality. I will build that 
imaginative home for your birds 
and other pets. Lowest price in 
town. 424-6499. 134T5-11 

BIRDS - Cockatoos: Citrons and 
Mullucans. $475.00. Many other 
types of birds available. Lowest 
price in town. Guaranteed 
healthy. 424-6499. 1 3 4T 5- 1 1 



GARAGE SALE - 

Charfestdwn Lake' South. 
-Moving: Multj-Family Yard 
Sale. Furniture, Baby items, 
stereo equipment, plants, men's 
and women's clothes, collec- 
tables, unusual art work. On 
Centerville Turnpike, follow 
signs to M17 Tanner Court. 
April 29 and 30. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
27 1 '/4t 4-27 



2t.Fl r a wa ad 



FIREWOOD UNLIMITED 

Custom-split. 12", 16", 18", 
21". Also whole log delivery. 
Call 543-3531. Ingrams since 
1979. 
28 4T 5-1 1 



29.L«n&6ird«a 



\i I Ml! 1 1 \in 



Hi^ QmHQt At L0W Price 

BABY 
BAZAAR 



SaacWGMfarSpKW 
FSEELAV-AWAV 



461-snn 



ISM 



taGpiMl 




BUTLER AND SON MULCH- 

Shrcdded wood and bark hard- 
wood, truckload, any size. 
Protect your shrubs. Get now 
while on sale. We deliver in one 
day. 853-0250 or 855-7467. 

c 29 TFN 

WALKER AND SONS 
TREE SERVICE 

Removal, tupping, stump grin- 
ding, crane service, fully insured. 
Free estimates, 488-9061 
anytime. 

29 4T 4-27 






Antique Repair & 
Rennisiiing 

Casio* reprodaclions 
■ irtnWf If yM CM 

Call 424-6499 




Commercial & Residential 

Design - Build 

Deui P. Edwards, Inc. 

ROCND AcfafiUODS 

<^nmi RonodeUnt 

D««** CoiKTete Work 

C1wMpe«ke f^^^ Home Consnictions 
»4-«2!-%73 919-261-2901 



Any Pwpeae Real EriMe Loni 
Vh|W»-NiirttC«<oftH 

wrniGO<»CREDrruPTO 

100^ Ot Value 

RftfiMUKc Mor^a^ 

lst,2a(i,or3nb 



12% 

BADCREMT 
«Mi Mrfficicaty c^aHy 

Guaranteed 
Approval 

St^ Forechisares 
Fmf J^^MCflis Or 

IRS 

AlMVAAfHAI 

opnniani 

Sal. MTVI2PM 



Af^Hnwi«l><2M 



«A ^1 , tf ■■■' ' * a^^^ 

j9a rmvuiMM vOTticot 



40.Scrvicca 



a new 1458 Sq. Ft 
Modified A-Frame Dwelling 

and 3 Waterfront Lots 
Sell at AUCTION 

May 14th -11:00 a.m. 
Located on navigatable water, 
naturally protected harbor yet 
just minutes from the Mouth of 
Little Wicomico River at the 
confluence of the Potomac River 
and the Chesapeake Bay "One of 
the Closest Possible Locations to 
the Bay's Finest Fishing Grounds 
- The Middle Grounds" - 3 large 
wooded lots. The dwelling is on 
1 .86 acres, 2 adjoining lots to be 
offered separately and in 
cominations approximately IH 
acres each located at Ophelia in 
Northumberland County, nedar 
Reedville. Ernest L. Rogers, 
Owner. For detailed brochure 
contact Ownby Auction & Realty 
Co., Inc. 1417 Brook Road, 
Richmond, Va. 23220. 
Telephone 804-664-LAND. 
, 36 3T 5-1 1 

AUCTION- 300 A<^ 

May lllh - Wednesday - iKa.m. 
Just WEst of the City of 
Franklin, Va. Estate of Hudson 
Douglas Williams. Great 
location with fantastic frontage. 
Main Farm - 242 acres. A highly 
productive farming unit, fronts 
new US Rt. 58 Bypass, long fron- 
tage 671 and 688. 66 acres in 
cultivation, 26 In pasture, 21 In 
ponds, 129 acres woodland, 
some sawtlmber. Peanut allot- 
ment • 60,438 lbs. Beautiful 
Country Home, remodeled in 
1970 w/alum. siding, storm win- 
dows and doors, 3 bedrooms. 2 
baths, living and dining room, 
den and kitchen combination. 

Property South of Rt. 671 Zoned 
Ml, Industrial, will be offered 
in 5 parcels, combinations and as 
whole frontage on Seaboard 
Coastline Railroad. Terms; IO»/« 
Deposit Sale Day. balance at 
closing within 60 days. Subject to 
Executor's Confirmation. For 
Information contact Ownby 
Auction and Really Co., Inc. 
1417 Brook Road, Richmond, 
Va. 232a). Telephone 804-664- 
LAND. 
36 3T 5^ 

FOR SALE - 15 acres, Grandy. 
N.C. On ri. 158 with house 
trailer by owner. Good buy with 
possible terms. Call 420-9445 

3fr4T-5/4 



MORTGAGE 

AAA Homeowners Loan: $5,000 
to $150,000. credit no problem, 
fast approval, application by 
phone. 1-703-998-7458 anytime. 
40 7T5-25 

SPRING TUNE UP SPECIAL! 

Push mowers, riders, tillers, 
edgers. most reasonable. 
Guaranteed service. 588-9107. 
40 4T 5-11 

SAVE NOW ON SPRING 
TUNE-UP'S, MOTOR- 
CYCLES, AND MOPEDS. 
CASH OFF PARTS AND 
LABOR. HALF MILE WEST 
OF MILITARY HIWY. BIG 
SID'S. 461-8959 
40-41-5/4 

ANDERSON REMODEUNG - 

All types of home repairs. Pain- 
ting. rooFing, siding, carpentry, ■ 
etc. Work guaranteed. Free 
estimates, insured and bonded. 
Call 588-2558. 
40 TFN 

LET US CLEAN Your Office. 
Any schedule that is convcnieiu 
for you. You can afford our 
prices. 623-0741 for free 
estimates. Ask for Louise. 
4Q4T4-27 

TREASURES AND JUNK - 

Don't throw it away. I'll come 
and get it. Call 545-0459 or 545- 
1396. 

40 4T 4-27 

CARPET CLEANING and in 
staHing. Contact Arnold, 488- 
7138. 

40414-27 

T 



WALLPAPERING AND 

Painting - Fast and friendly ser- 
vice, local references furnishe4ir 
Call us for a free estimate. Ar- 
thur and Company Redecorating 
Conracton. 420-3478. 
51 TFN 

PAINTING - Urge or small 
jobi. Interior and exteriM. Free 
estimates. Very reasonable 
prices. References available upon 
request. Commercial work also 
done, and light carpentry and 
wallpapering experience. Call 
397-5483 or 484-1425. 

51 TFN 



52. 



LEIGH PHOTOGRAPHIC 

Service - Beautiful Wedding 
Memories • Photography For 
Any Occasion. Call 482-1312 
Today. "The Wedding Photo- 
graphers". 

52 TFN 



BATHROOM REMODEUNG - 

Old and new. Specializing in 
ceramic tile walls and floor 
covering. Reasonable rates. Free 
estimates. 20 years experience in 
Tidewater area. Small and large 
jobs. Guarantee all work. Call 
547-4774 anytime. 

. snm 



St-TaxSatvlM 

INCOME TAX - and Account 
ing (including tax audio). Mario 
Venditti, former Revenue Afcnt. 
3707 Virgiiiia Beach Blvd.. (near 
RoMinont Rd.) Call 463-6608. 



tl.MacMMryAR4Taab 



42.CMyCara 



COUNTRY DAY CARE 

Hourly, part time, full time, pre- 
school, kindergarten, after 
school care. Call now for '/i 
price introductory offer. 2 
locations, Greoi Run, 427-1891, 
1305 Windmill Pt. Kempsville, 
467-8835. 1100 Indian Ukes 
Blvd. 
42 4T 5-18 

CHILD CARE - Need two 
children any age, excellent care 
and conditions, full time. Kem- 
psville/Charlestown area. Call 
after 6 p.m. at 467-71 14. 

42 4T 5-11 

CHILD CARE - Infants through 
4 years. Available weekdays for 
your childs care beginning June 
13. Loving home in Deep Creek. 
Call 487-81 56. 

42 4T 5-11 



MACHINERY AND TOOLS: 

Payloader-1978, 515 Inter- 
national artioilating payioada, 
2 yards. No hrs. since major 
overhaul. Looks and runs like 
new. $35,000. CHARLIE 
BRYANT 461-4023 

tHT -?/4 

PAYLOAO{a-l97t, 515 Inter- 
national articulating payloader. 
2 yards. No hrs. since major 
overhaul. Looks and runs like 
new. $35,000. CHARLIE 
BRYANT 461-4023 

, tHT-?/4 

BULLDOZER-TD IS Series B. 
NO houn since major overhaul. 
Like new. $30,000. Charlie 
Bryant 461 -4023, tiU 9 p.m. 

6I-4T-5/4 



[1 



t2.Fl8a Mwlwt 



43. Cancrtt^MaaManr 



CONCRETE - Quality work 
done on driveways, sidewalks, 
patios and pool decks, etc. New 
or old construction. Call Scott, 
482-2672. 

43 4T 4-27 



45. 




HOUSE TRAILER: 1970 Sher- 
wood - 12 by 60, good condition, 
2 bedroom new hot water heater 
and faucetts, underskirt. $3,500. 
Cali 543-6467 or 543-5164 

t 3MT-5/3 

HOLIDAY - 1975, excellent 
condition, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 
and appliances, new vinyl skir- 
ling, plus many exras. Moving 
must sell. Home must be moved. 
$9,400 or best offer. Call 468- 
0770. If no answer call 427-2176. 

38 TFN 

CONER - '82 14 by 70. 2 
bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, central 
air, fireplace, fenced yard, shed. 
Woodshire Trailer Park. 
Chesapeake, Call 487-2936. 
_ 38 4T 4-27 



PRESTON PEST CONTROL 

1 specialize in the control of any 
household pest. Special price on 
warehouse or apartment, 5 room 
home or mobile home.. .$15.00 
Call: 543-18%. 

454T5-1I 

MASTER PEST Control - 
Scientific extermination. Sand 
and moisture control, window»ill 
and joice r^r, house jacking. 
Free Termite inspection. $5 off 
on termite control. $50 off on 
roach control with this ad. 
F.H.A. i VA. report! given. 



SHOPS FOR RENT • Good 
locations. 134 N. Battlefield 
Blvd. CaU 545-4952 or 547-»017. 

62 IT 4-27 

NORMAN'S FLEA MARKET - 
Vegetable, flower pianu. and 
garden supplies. Lawn mowers 
repaired. Quick service. 4718 
Portsmouth Blvd. near Joliff, 
Chesapeake. 465-3300. 
62 4T 5-11 

DEBORAH'S FLEA MARKET: 

5939 Va. Beach. Blvd. 461-9778 
INSIDE SHOPS OPEN 7 
DAYS. GOLD/SILVER 
BOUGHT/SOLD. OUTSIDE 
SPACES. SAT. AND SUN. $3 
A DAY. 
6?-4T-5/4 

BIG TOP FLEA MARKET • 

Have your sale hat. toying gold 
and diainonds. etc. 7600 SeweUs 
Pt. Rd. 480-3122. Toes, thru 
Sun. 

62-4T-5/4 

FARIS ST. FLEA MARKET: 
3450 AZALEA GARDEN RD. 
SHOES, SOCKS, AND HOSE 
FOR YOUR DOLLS WILL 
DRESS IN CHRISTENING 
CLOTHES WITH FRENCH 
BONNETS. CALL 853-5877 



•3. 



^W« Hi^WI^ vl 



MOVING - Cleaning and 
Hauling of all kinds. CaU 543- 
»97. 49 4T 4-27 



WASHERS, DRYERS. Ranges. 
Refrigerators. Re^onabk rates. 
CaU 460451?- 63 4T 5-11 

A HTTEII I«AL FOR YOUR 
KK>BILE. Runnii^ or not! Free 
towii^. Call 499-«q28 



L « L PLUMBING, Heating, 
and Air Conditioning; R^iair 
and new work -sewer lines, water 
teaters, faucets repaired and 
drains unstopped. 24 hours. CaU 
853-0056. 

394T4-27 

AAW UETMrn: AM phue of 
carpentry and painting. 
Prof^KMi^ rooTi^i. piti«ing. 
vinyl Mfiag. ckmsic vSe, room 
adtttioM Md av^at*- Lkoaad. 
ii^nd. Md taaidea. AM ««rk 
piarai^e«.CalW»4MI 

fHXP> 

%^hmm^s.t\,t, . t^»4, kM«n, 

s, aiaou 

■njiniin Kci'>0n»pie raies. 
Wwk guaraniccd. Call 54'"*M5 



0fFS£TNElVSP4PERS 
4«rfCfllCULilJIS 



BYEKLY PUBUCATIOHS 



M 



(27-5020 ArOnMlM 



■■■■HIBII 



20 Virginia Beach Sun, April 27, 1983 




RK Chevrolet Presents 

The Exotic American - 1984 Corvette 



I 




^H 


- 


^^^^^^^^1 


^^^^^^H 


1 







RK Chevrolet is proud 
to present the 1984 Cor- 
vette - a new Corvette 
that is the most com- 
prehensively packaged 
autbrhobfle of all times. 
One with advanced 
stylrng, innovative 
engineering, high 
technology, quality and 
comfort. 

This year's Corvette is 
the culmination of 30 
years of evolutionary 
engineering dedicated to 
the one true American 
Sports Car. 

It takes design 
sophistication to be the 
best sports car in the 
world. And the new Cor- 
vette has some very quick 
lines. A most acute win- 



dshield rake for a produc- 
tion car, front and rear 
side-mounted cornering 
lamps, twin sport mirrors 
that are electrically ad- 
jusfcd and 

aerodynamically shaped 
and four functional cir- 
cular taillights are among 
its many design features. 

The new Corvette was 
shaped in GM's wind tun- 
nel for the lowest drag 
coefficient of any Corvet- 
te ever tested: .341. Ad- 
vanced methods of 
monitoring turbulence as 
it relates to a moving car 
were employed to achieve 
wind assistance rather 
then wind resistance. 

The solid fiberglass 
body continues to be one 
of the most enduring 
qualities of the Corvette. 



Advanced techniques have 
provided a smoother 
degree of beauty this year. 

Lift off a fuU-width, 
one-piece fiberglass roof 
section to' create a true 
open-air feeling. Applied 
aero-dynamics help reduce 
cockpit turbulence. And 
the top stores conveniently 
in a rigid lockdown 
position in the rear com- 
partment when you're 
riding with the wind and 
bolts securely into place 
with a special wrench 
when there's stormy 
weather ahead. 

The space-age in- 
strumentation of the new 
Corvette is something to 
behold. Electronic liquid 
crystals display multi- 
colored readouts, both 
analog and digital. 



Speed, revolutions and 
numeric readouts of 
engine and electrical con- 
ditions are provided in 
your choice of languages;^ 
English or metric. 

The result of these new 
design and manufacturing 
technologies is the best 
nroduction sports car in 
the world. A new Corvet- 
te with outstanding elec- 
tronic techi^ology, advan- 
ced styling, innovative 
engineering, impressive 
quality and ergonomic 
comfort. 

Besides being the best 
production sports car in 
the world, it has 
remarkable handling. The 
suspension solution that 
gives the new Corvette the 
agility of a mountain lion 
features a single. 



fiberglass monoieaf tran- 
sverse spring in front in 
lieu of the traditional 
coils. Your've also got 
forges aluminum arms 
and knuckles, stabilizer 
bars and telescoping 
shocks working for you. 

The muscle behind the 
motion of tJie new Corvet- 
te is a 5.7 Liter 350 CID 
twin-throttle body, Cross- 
Fire Injection V8. What 
all this means is the new 
Z51 -equipped Vette, on 
the test track, can reach a 
top speed of 142 MPH 
and to 60 times of 6.8 
seconds. It's a new and 
exclusive version of our 
renowned small-block V8, 
for a completely new Cor- 
vette. 

To get this power to the 
road, there's a 4 • speed 
automatic transmission 
with overdrive. In the fir- 
st three gears it performs 
like a conventional 3- 
speed automatic t^an- 
smTssIdn. When the 
vehicle reaches cruising 
speed, the transmission 
automatically shifts into 
overdrive. Gnce in over- 
drive the engine turns 
slower and it doesn't have 
to work as hard. This ad- 
ds up to smooth cruising 
with reduced engine wear. 

The torque converted 
clutch provided the con- 
venience of an automatic 
transmission with the per- 
formance features of a 
direct drive, manual tran- 
smission. 

Because a car that goes 
fast must also stop fast, 
the Oirlock brake system 



has been introduced to the 
new Corvette. These high- 
performance brakes ahve 
ll'/i" discs and a low- 
drag, aluminum caliper 
design for reduMd weight 
and remarkable vehicle 
dynamics. In the hands of 
a professional driver, on 
the rest track the new 
Corvette can go from to 
100 MPH and b«:k to 
again in 22.4 seronds! 

Balance was the key to 
creating a vehicle capable 
of producing a high level 
of all-around sports car 
performance. This means 
virtually and equal weight 
distribution of all four 
wheels of the car, resulting 
in remarkable braking, 
acceleration, cornering, 
straight'line performance, 
overall ride and comfort. 

This marks the begin- 
ning of a new era in which 
the American automobile, 
by redefining the limits of 
gravity, space and time, 
has joined the elite of the 
exotic sports car worid. 

The Chevrolet family of 
people who have con- 
ceived and who oinstruct 
the new Corvette, and 
those who proudly service 
and sell it, offer you their 
finest achievement: 
The best production spor- 
ts car in the world. 
The new Corvette. 
The best lyay to 
discover that the new 
Corvette is all about isn't 
by reading about it here. 
RK Chevrolet invites you 
to come in and get a first 
hand look at the 
remarkable new Corvette. 



Sale Extended Thru Thursday, 

April 28, 

9 p.m. - Duf To 

Overwhelming Success 



RK S ACmnCE PRICES 

NO PROFIT 
SALE 

We are overstocked with new 1982 Models that we 
must sell during April. There's no small print in 
this ad and no gimmicks. Every car is listed 
below. Come in now and pick out the new 1982 
Chevrolet you want. It doesn't matter what it says 
on the sticker, you'll get the car for what it cost us. 
AT NO PROFIT. It's as simple as that. 



STOCK <> MODEL PRICE 

6077 Monte Carlo J'^W 

6262 Cavalier 4 Dr. 7575 

6321 Cavalier 4 Dr. 7875 

6432 Celebrity 2 Dr. M75 

6074 Malibuaassic4Dr. M7S 

6077 Monte Carlo 9575 

6134 Malibu Classic 4 Dr. 9*75 

6155 Cavalier C-L 4 Dr. W75 

6169 Cavalier 2 Dr. Hatchback '175 

6432 Celebrity «i75 

6874 Chevette 5675 

6898 Celebrity 8975 

6929 Cavalier 4 Dr. , C-L *^5 

6727 Celebrity 9075 

6969 Malibu 4 Dr. 9075 

6134 Malibu 4 Dr. 8975 




lYNNHAVEN MWY. AT 

VA. BEACHBLVD. 

486-2222 



VANTASTIC SPRING SALE 

On All Custom Vans 



AS LOW AS 



7995 



NO ONE ANYWHERE WILL OUT 
SELL OR OUT TRADE VIRGINIA'S 
LARGEST VAN DEALER. 




\W^^ 





463-6100 



3443 Va. Beach Blvd. 
Next To Princess Anne Plaza 

DMV 8502 



f";. 



Tidewater's Largest Inventory Of 
S-10 and K-10 4x4 Pick-Up Trucks 

Up To 



2000 



00 



Discount! 





(With This Ad) 



KUne Chevrolet 

1495 S. Military Hwy. > 
3 Mi. Sooth of Military arcle 

424-1811 



Perry Buick 

Keeps eamoiny 
initsplace. 




EPA46Hwy.,28City^ 

Hie ]9S^ 'Bukk SM^ifc. 



9.9% Financing available 
on these models 

offer ends Ma> ] I si. 198] 




WYNNE MOTOR 
CORP. 



V»i\ Ml K( I |i 



I2,MM5 



11.295 .1'. I 



')A'>5 



I3,4M5 



/, i*f> 



lit U K kll. \l 



EPA 42 Hwy., 27 City 

PERRY BUICK 

MM VBI^NIA BEACH BLVD. 

IN mnmx at newtown mab 

SERVING TIDEWATER ,,, ^„„ 
OVER 52 YEARS 461-8855 




>.My^ 



'5.205 ^' 



124 MONTH. 24,000 MILE WARRANjfl 



WVNNKMOIORCORP 



4(. 1-6801) 




You don't give up 

a thing at Budget where you're #1 

• Lorn rates by the day, weekend or loiiger 

• Free pick up and delivery 

• Most wu^or credit cards booorcd 

• Fw 9mi-iii-tawn rescrvatfoaa, tM frac- 

dlal "1" A then M0>S27-rm 

FOR LOCAL RESERVATIONS CALL 

Norfoli ■•tenwItoMi Alnton - Norfoh. Va 9»M3S 

MMN.MMai7Bwy.-NoffA.Va MB-MII 

33MVksW>acadin^.-Vtoi^i*Bca^Va 34M413 

PMrUltaK)FAiv««-Ncwp«tNc«t.Va 4...n4-9m 

lMMMIinMA«t.-NM>»wtNc«n,Va. HMWI 

ITHrmahaalMTi^ - W h—ta rt . Va. 




6.9 <7o 

ON AT J , NEW 
PONTIACS 




AMT. riNANCE TOTAL MONTHLV 
tlNANCm Mm. * CNAMS: PAtlONT PAnONT 




SM M *.» MtM sm.m mM 
mm MM Mi.» mmM iM.n 

IMt » *.• W.M mtM USM 
MM » *•*' "9^ l*nM mM 

mi » *.9 mjt «wja it7.4i 

Mm M *.> MI».H lliiW.H JMJl 

IMM 11 ••• nmm ux»M m.u 
mm » *^* nun ajnn mn 




—m » M mM imM U4.M 

«W « •■• llil.M IISLH mM 

MH « (.* U4sji oflji mm 
mm m *■* nnn wr.u iM.t» 
mm m *■• mtM m,mM mji 
mm m >■• mi-it ii3u.i» imjy 
IMM m ■■• nt*M U.IIMI mM 
IMM m «•» a«M« HM.n mM 


-J 


36 MONTHS 
25% DOWN 

WITH APPROVED 
CREDIT 

GreenhriMT Pkw3h.& S. Military Hwy. 

One Hair Mile North of Greenbrier Mail 
42M«t 



-^ 




A Year of 
Celebrations 

Virginia Beach 



Jwentieth Anniversary 
Special Supplement 

To The Virginia Beach Sun 




2 '83 A Year Of Celebration 



20 Siirinv "^i^ars 

As 




WxW's 
Resort 

Calls For 
ACeldbratioo! 



Here's To You, Virgmia Beach. Happy 20th Anniversary I 



f 



1 

-V- 






You're still going strong, Virginia 
Beach. Your surf and san^ shores 
\^lcome more and more sun-bving 
friends and visitors each year. 

\^'re proud am! happy to be i»rt 
of your prospoxnis growUi. 



Count on us for rewarding sa\ 
plans and specialized loans and we^ 
continue to welcome old friends and 
make new friends together. 

Happy 20th Anniversary! 



Home Inderal 

Savings and Imi Association 



of^^irfoK 




organized K86 



^^C 



^OfflcK TOO Bouah street, NorfBlk,VA/ 2474^21 
&™ "*fe^''****!«» Cornar / PtetSBwoth / 1^^ 
Hampton/ Suffolk/ Hilltop /D^bigh^fi^?4^ 



83 A Ywtf Of Celcbniiion 3 



City Celebration 

Something 

For 

Everyone 

Something for everyone wiU be the name <rf the game 
when the Qty of Virginia Beach crflkially celeintites its 
20th birthday on Saturday, April 30. 

Gty i^dl Day, as the event has been named, 
commemorates the 1963 merger which united the then 
tiny resort strip city of /\^irglnia Beach with its 
sprawling, sparsely populated neighbor. Princess Anne 
County. The day long celebradon will be held oo the 
grounds of the modem Municipal Center complex 
which was built on the sit (rf the historic Princess Anne 
Conrthottse at the intersection (^ Princess Anix and 
North landing Roods. 

Parking will be available at Kellam High School on 
Holland Road and Virginia Beach Vo-Tech on North 
Landing. Coitinuous free trdley rides from both 
locations will be provided. 

Virtually all offices in the complex will be open for 
visitors from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on City Hall Day. Staff 
members will be on hand to answer questions and 
special displays ranging from walking, talking compu- 
ters to a working model of the city's sophisticated 
traffic signal system will be used to explain the 
workings of the many city departments. 

The little Qeek based U.S. Navy Chuting Stars will 
officially open the festivities with a 10:30 a.m. jump 
in the festival area. The jump will be followed by a 
parade comprised of mwe than 30 major units. Sidney 
Kellam, longtime local civic leader who was instrumen- 
tal in the Virginia Beach merger, will be the Grand 
Marshall for the parade. 

A full day's schedule of family wiented games and 
activities will include events ranging from a Diaper 
Derby (games fcM- toddlers and tots) to a Five 'N One 
Family Sack Ra<». fa between will be greased pole 
climbs, frisbec contests. Egg Stra (games with eggs for 
all ages) and T\igs O' War. Entertainment will be 
provided throughout the day oi five separate stages. 
Hie Mlantic Fleet Show Band will be center stage fa 
the t^dal cake cutting <%remony at 2 p.m. while a 
cross section <rf local talent including a martial arts 
group, gospel singers, rope jumpers, rock bantb, and 
high sdiod clKiral groups will round out the 
entertainment sdiedule. 

Professknal fireaghten, vdunteer rescue squads 
and the police defStrtoKnt's K-9 unit will take turns 
demonstatiog their skills. Kids will have an opportunity 
to dress in firefigbtini gear and listen to good advke 
from Snuffy the Talking Fire Engine. If they |»efcr, 
they may t^k to the Mid-Atlantic Coca Cola RolMt. 
meet Yogi Bear from Kii^a DonaniaB, Wendy from 
Wendy's. Ski, the 7-11 Ctoira, Officer McGraff or a 
nwltitu^ of other bmiUar dttriii^rs. 

Amoot the spedai attractioas far aduto are a {riant 
diaic far dagnoa^ te»c aadgwden iwiety UMtses 
and a very special appanmty to sUip by the OeMral 
Registrar's offix to be«iae a legMtered voter ta tte 
dty (tf Virginia Beadi. Conprehrasive ftfeMtf Hei^ 
Services wiB he^ Msets persond stteai kveb nd die 
Vepitmeu ai Af^exlme will cteck the acoiracy of 
prcsswe coeftBrgmges far thoM who bring ttea ni. 

Tlie dty'i agiia*!!!!! herila^ wM he reilected^in 
tpedai eduiUtt feMring 441 trieiU. eidtmie akflb. 
Iiw and pooy rid» ud a oonMiy ^pk b^ «t the 
F^nnen' Martet oo Lambtoim Rood. ArdN«B «od 
(Hwrter bones iril be on dispioy at the Moiri^ 
Cfeoter wWdi wa Ao be the bc^on of a cw»-«iBwg 
GQottit between the city's Dbcctor of Apieukiiic. Odt 
Cbdcrel. and tte Vkse-fcfajfor. tartwa Henley. 

Side i ne se n mien s •« be •m»«1* •?«!?^' of 
exiHbits wkh ■ne]aa specW one OB tbe Ustonr of the 

d9 to te sbown every biiMiaur in ciQf oeuncfl 

cbu^ieis. 
Mater Chief Dm Habn. Uai. win play the port of m 

old sak far the day i^ he dons the Mifam or n 

tora-of-tte-oeittiry Ufeboit StUioB SiirfiBon far the 

^xiaia BeKb WUMm Mstarkil Mnseun ednMt. 

UlEMSt good seitfhiw' nmi hel t^ Mies and spa 

Mttw far aB lite «a km- 




City Seal Gets Facelift 



Tke Vkfiirift UatA dty wd «t Mmmt 
TiwlMMre, wilcfc Is BOW cmbpom^ of a 
craikcr nm tew (fiommi rock) ui 
oviiWi iHdi Icrrazzo rack, wVI kc €»m- 
pMy KpkMcd ky tke cui of B»t year by 



AccoNte t9 Steve Kraskop, kiker 



tttokMAaJ ki WH hm kcca iron 4omm 
^tkeclciMMt. 

**11e aeal got ki kad Aape," Kradtep 
ttM, "prokakly kacaaic of ttie r^ ivc 
kai Ikk wtater/* He iM tke acal If riowly 



CTHaiMBgaway. 

To keep tke leal lalact It It kdag 
repkMcd, la two pkaici, ky coaev^. Tke 
ceater tectfM of tke leiri is expects to kc 
conpleted ky tke ea4 of tUt year. Tke ea- 
tke teal wM ke fiaMMd ky tke end of aexl 

year. 
Tke origlBal iiaaKlcr of tke ieal was 49 

feet II k« kcca eirfiiiei> 42 feet. Tke 
niljlMl aaterteii jOMt of tlie seal was 
$5,IM. Tke aew scaiis expected to cost 
BMie. SapervWag tke work oa tke seal Is 
W Aferotk, feacfal sapervisor, Parks 
aad BecreatioB. 



^ 



4 '83 A Year Of Celebration 



From Years Past 



Can You Name These City Council Members? 




#10 

Auwers On Page 16 



20 Years Of Virginia Beach History 



January I, 1963 - Princess Anne County and the City 
of Virginia Beach consolidate - became the New City of 
Virginia Beach. Frank Dusch - Mayor. W. Russell Hal- 
chett - City Marutger. 

1M4 - Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel opens. 
1M7 - Mt. Trashmore b^un. Virginia Beach/Nor- 
folk Expressway opens. 

1M9 - 1st satdlite City Hall. Center f<^ Effective 
Learning opens. Virginia Beach General Hc^tal 
(tedicated. 

IfTt - Opening of Airport Industrial Park. 

1971 - Virginia Beach wins Homvabie Mention in All 
America City competition. Rudee Inlet Marina becomes 
fully operational. Red Wing Golf Course opens. 

1972 - 1st |Hud firemen in H» City of Virginia Beach. 
City Jail under investigation by State Board of Welfare 
and Institutions. Oceana West Industrial Park opens. 
Vocational Technical Center opens. Wetlands Board 
established. City wins Fickle Finger of Fate Award from 
popular television program. Establishment of three new 



programs to aid dttoens - SEVAMP program for 
elderly, Non-secure Detentim Home for troubled youth 
and the Pendleton Project for the »me purpo%. 

1973 - New Court buiUing umta' coomoctioa. New 
Public Safety butti^ uiuto c<^Kruction. Tidewater 
R^nal Sdtp Bd»t Dct^ Ch«m|Nonship hdd at Mt. 
Trashmore. ttke TraU opens. Ground broken fw con- 
sirwrtion of Tidt««icr OHBmunity Orikie. 4S-IS 
Scho<ri^pkiii in fuH opcnOkM. Wato^ Contrw^ with N<»- 
folk. Plaza Express Traiwt Experiment b^ins. Ccms- 
prehensive Zoning Ordinance rewiy tox final vote. 

1974 • SecOTdary Schotri Bounties Retkawn. Ap- 
pointmou of New FticCUef. Bosdvwik Art Stow has 
recoid ^v in nte $145,238,000. ^ephaiue A. Do«^y 
become Miss Virginia. First Annual Nei^une Festival 
hdd. Offlcial opening of Mt. Trashmore Park. Official 
opening of Tidewato- Community Colkge, Virginia 
Beach Campus (New facUities) City Mana^^ reagns. 
GccH-ge L. Hanbury II beoMnes City Manager. Bond 
issue for New Jail |»ss«l. First Annual Neptune 
Festival takes pliux. More than 33,000 iwIhIs enroll in 
Virginia Beach schools, the largest enrolUmit in the 
state. Bond issue for new jail approved. HelicofAas 
initiate by police. 



Expansion of Windsor Wo«b and Bayside Ubraries 
completed. Circuit Court Building compIetMl. Ammal 
Control Biulding (»mpleted. Old Donation Oceana Fire 
Building opens. Qty begins recdving CETA funds. 
Water and se«^ lines fMs exem^on for the ekierly and 
finan^Ily ^Uadvantaged b^ns. Tidewater Com- 
miinitv CoUoK beach amiinis c^jens. 



Vm - 0«4's CNdi Mwycqid Tc^ Court opem 
VirgWa BoKdi pcikt b^in i>iMte Aii«raica Pn^ram. 
City aoiuires Bayvitte Park rite. P«Mc Sif^ biikling 
dediotted. Sandbridge awl Provid»ice Road Fire 
Station compkted. C^ imwc^ms ^e HaU and ad- 
jacoit propety. aty bcmd r^^^«ilt«l from A-1 to 
A-8. 



1974 - FCC grants Cox Cable «rtificationof (»m- 
pliance to begin construction ai^ initiate service to the 
city. Independent Developmoit Authority etablished. 
Farmer's Market opens. Gmt N«;k branch library 
opens. Tax Relief for tl% eiikrly i^t^ram b^'ns. Ctmn- 

SeeBcMliP«el« 



•83 A Yetr Of Cdebration 5 



■t^ 




J 



6 IJAYewOfCelebratioii 



Where To Have Fun, On City Hall Day 



DifMiiMi MrJNft H Mi 23 



»>»*at MXWK.T 




Tf'-"-- 111., 




/t 



MMCI 



^ " /AHv 




IM^ «r liMOSCMT StIhflCtS, 4/»3 



LtSCNO 




© 


© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
8 
© 

e 
<s> 

Q 
D 

• 

A 



HM^mMTlON MOTH 

CITt NALL 

OmiATKMS 

SCHOOL lOAIID 

COimtCTION rACH-ITY 

P'JVLK SAFfTY 

COURTS 

»M»fiailweA|.TH'S ATTSRftCY 

AfiNICULTlMC • VOTER RC8I8TRAR 

OCCUPATIONAL HCALTH 

HIGH CONSTAMLC 

6RECNH0USC 

Pump STATION 

MCAT PLANT 

PUiLIC INFOHMATC* OFP<CE 

POLICE DISPLAY 

PIRE OEPT DISPLAY 

EMER6CNCY MEOVAL SERVICES 

AGRICULTURE OEPT DISPLAY 

PUILIC HEALTH DISPLAY 

Showmoiile locatiw a no 

RADIO STAT IMS 

CRAFTS Displays 

CITY OEPT DISPLAY TENTS 
TROLLY STOPS 
PARADE ROUTE 
FIRST AID STATION 



9 a.m. • Five tnHcy •cnrkt from Kelfaun Hf h School 
•od Vo-Tech pwldai iou begins. 

9:30 t.iii. • Camdiaa fmmn Tmt. 

10 a.111. - ComdiOT FmHUt Tmt. Rivlew if JaveiMc 
iMate Mi Amrib Cam ^tMub; Juvenile and 
Ooa»tic Retatkns Court Builcttu, Sooei 201. 

10:30 •.m. - Jump by tbe U^rilMy ChMk« Stan; 
Wmxi% Asat RomI ud Jama Ntacitai Bo^vvd. 
fteMc tbrot^h the MinucqMl Omer Oomirfex. Sktacy 
Kclnii,QMiManlal. 

11 a.m. - 1^ GpM CqKriK Q^ar - hutt fcr 100 
missing anniversaiy cakes; games area. Hlra and sBde 
preseotMioa on tlw Sena I HfMentst ftetalica 
PNfnoi; Juvenile uA Domestic Rehttian Court 
Building, Room 201. FoUce DepartiiKnt K-9 ieaoN 
stratfoa; pcUce (fisi^y area. 

11:30 a.m. • biricatfoi of victfni all PaMk Safety 
MHlM by the KenpsvUe Velnrtccr IbMM Sqiai. 

12 (mxn) • Umpr Oerty. ganws for Bttte toU; games 
area. "IMve Mi Sarvlve", a spedal stewmg erf the 
fibn shown to idl new teenage dirvers; Juvenile and 
Domestic RelatiORS Court Building, Room 201. PoUce 
Department K-9 demonstratkn; police disfriay area. 
Ac deal Ce« MUMiig CMleit hctwcca Vice N^er 
■wkara Henley Mi UdtCociieB. Director of Vfrgmia 
Be«:h's Department d Agricutture; Agricuhural 
Display Area. l^-af-Ww between dty departments; 
games area. 

1 p.m. - Extrication erf victim ftora wrecked airto 1^ 
the Courthouse and Plaza Volunteer ibescue Sqnaib; 
EMES display area. Egg-Stra, games with eggs ffx aU 
i«es; games area, ftesertatioo by DtvcniM IMt m 
D«>""lte •■< fSaadly CTn— iBng Scrvkcs; Juvenile 
and Domestic Reiations Court BuUding, Room 201. 

1 p.m. - Midn«ht Aknn, lie icaAwn iamaMtra- 
dM by the ProfesstOMi Rre FlilKers AsMKiation; fire 
disiriay area. Police Departinent K-9 (femonstratioD; 
pdfce i&iriay area. "nig-of-War between dty depai. 
nwntt contmues; games area. 

2 p.m. - Jtohday oda orttfa^ ccrMuay, Mayor 
Lows Joocs, presiding, shownusbile CS, - Qty Hall 
BuiUing (Cake prepared by Casa Farello's Restaurant). 
Five 'N OBc sad( races for the whole family; games 
area. Presentation on the I^bdMHc IhiaBiiBy HmMm; 

' «*fl— Mi l JilMi i iiijflBit iiiaiiw 



201. Pt^ce Departmem K-9 ^moostration; pdice 
display area. 

2:30 p.m. - ExtrioAion oi victim c^ Public Safety 
Biulding by tlw ^Qrginia Beach Volunteer Rescue 
S(^ad. 

3 p.m. - Midmght Akrra, flre readiness (femonstra- 
tioB by the PnfessioBal Fire Rghten Associttioo: &e 
disi^y area. FoHce Deputnett k-9 demoostration; 
poUn disj^y wea. 

3:43 p.m. • CorrectioB Facility Tour. 

8 pjn. - 'OIk Prime of Mb Icm Breile", KaaipHfc 
RetTeatko Center l^eater. Admission $2. for reserva- 
tion caU 495-1892. 

8:30 p.m. - CelctairiiM *mcc spomored by the 
OccMfroot Jaycees, ^^inia Bck^ Dome, tickets 
required. 

atyHaRDay 



11 ajn. - Bivride Htib Sdnol • Ktaik^ Sii«as, 
Showmotrik II. itae Lefgc EipfCM. Siowmobile #2; 
"Hm CiMef *' • Martai Ml», Showmobile 13; Pippeti, 
aiowiwjMle 14. 

12 (noQo) • BaysMe Hik School Baiii, Showmobile 
#1; Imp Ro^ . WkiiMT Oris Deimtary School, 
ShowmoWe #3; Seatack Gaapel Sl^cn. Siowmobile 

1 pm. - flaflairi Oattcn. Showmobile #2; Sweet 
AiellMs, ShowmoUe #3; Sarier dlteas S«nif 
BMccn, ShowmoHk f4: UWe Ckcck Scboel of Mask 
b* Baai, ShowmoWte «S. 

2 p.m. - KempavSa High Sckeol Sb«Nr Cherai, 
Showmobile #1; Am«I|m nri niMial Dmcc Staiie, 
ShowmoWe mCktMtUtUmm • Faft WimtHf, 
Showmolak M; Qprah« eiMMiiRa, U.S. Athu^ 
fleet ShMT. iairi, ^wwmobik #5. 

3pjn. -SUWi.lJSA, ShownMUle #2; QokimI^ 
- Mk singer, ShowmoUk 14. 

•Vkit witk Virginia Beach City CshkI aMaibcn; 
mayw's irfBce, Qty HaU BuikUng (exceiK during 
parade). 



'83AYeirOfCeld>rktion 7 



^ 




m pRSMer^' 



WITH 
QUALITY 4t STYLE 



<■ 



AFFORDABLE PRICES 



Sea Dream Leather, Inc. was founded in 1972 by Pete Ashby, Jim Stone 
and Ray Tolson while students at Virginia Commonwealth University. The 
original business consisted of wholesaling belts manufactured by the three 
founders. Upon graduation the business expanded into retailing a wider line 
of products. Eventually three stores were opened in the Richmond area, 917 
West Grace Street (closed January 1980), Cloverleaf Mall and Regency 
Square. A store was opened in Coliseum Mall in Hampton in November of 
1979. Other stores have opened in Lynchburg (a franchise in Riverridge 
Mall), Charlottesville (Fashion Square), Norfolk (Military Circle), and 
Lynnhaven Mall in Virginia Beach. 

Sea Dream offers a complete line of leather goods and services. Our 
products range from all leather footwear to garments, luggage and ac- 
cessories. We continue to manufacture a wide range of our own products in 
our Richmond shop. This enables our company to service what we sell and 
to ensure a high level of quality. We pride ourselves on our product 
knowledge, experience and service. 

We believe we have established stores in which customers can feel con- 
fident that their best interests are served. Our employees provide a cordial 
atmosphere in each store and the customer can purchase the very fmest 
quality leather products from a well informed and professional staff mem- 
ber. 



IN VIRGINIA BEACH AT 

LYNNHA VENMALL 

IN NORFOLK AT 

MILITARY CIRCLE 

IN HAMPTON AT 
COLISEUM MALL 




DREAM 

LFATHER 




SEA 
DREAM 

LEATHER 




-m\SSiA 

DREAM 

-'LEATHER 




SEA 
DREAM 

LEATHER 




SEA 
DREAM 

LEATHER 




SEA 
DREAM 

LEATHER 




SEA 
DREAM 

LEATHER 



SEA 
DREAM 

LEATHER 





SEA 
DREAM 

LEATHER 




DREAM 

LEATHER 




Every SEA imEAM product and customs ^tt the SEA PMAM personal touch! 



«n 



tl nr('»a'»*«iU'"» ■»/■» ---vr t "O' 



8 '83 A Year Of Celebration 



THE ODDS ARE 

H.LS. DID 
BETTER THAN 

TOURS. 



Substantially better. In fact, Uw 
Hutt(m Investment Series Growth FiUKi 
showed a net total retam of J9 pen»»< kist 
year. 

Tliere is i») ^»y of tellii^ if your fund 
(or any other) am repeat its past succ^. 
It often depends on the market itself. But 
there are aspects of oicr mutual funds thiU 
are wortii eonaderiz^ when you ctxigiave 
re^ts. 

llie Hutton Invratment Sertes, to be- 
gin with, tak^ advantage of the industry's 
finest research defKutments. 

The Hutton Investment &ries (Growth 
Fund is actually part of the H.LS. family of 
fimr funds. Growtii. Emei^i^ Growth. 
Short Iferm (money maricet). And Bond 
and Income. There is no initial sales 
charge. And as market conditions or your 
own investment objectives change, you can 
shift your assets between tJie funds 
at no c(^t. 



In a strm^ stodc market, for examine, 
you can nMive into the Growth or Emergii^ 
(kt>wft funds. If int»<^t rates contini^ to 
fall you may fiml bonds aj^ropriate. And if 
istes rise to the tevels of tiiej^, the sd^rt 
term money market fund remains availal^. 

All mutual AhmIs make sense becsuise 
th^ ^r«ui yotff ridra acitxs a nu^ of 
different i8»i%.Hbe Hutton Inv^toient 
Series makes even betto* s^f^e becmise it 
lets you brcmden your in^^stafnent nux to 
span a range of markets. 

For Prosp&ivs' and comply iitformor 
lion regarding charges and expend, maU 
the wupm or caU EJFl HvJtimi, 

R^kd tihe Proq)eetis carefully before 
you invest or send money. 



s«i!iu««!KiiMri-n 



I like those odds. 

The Hutton Investment Series oertamfy 
sounds like a sn»rt idea to me. 
11 I want to read about the detalte,|^ase send 
im* your lioddet and Pfo^sectus an H.LS. 

I I I want to talk about H.I.S., {Jease have 

an Arfount Executive get in touch with nje. 

I need actkm r^t away, so I'm caliir^; 
(104(446-1400 (80iH481'}00O 



Niirih- 






Still,- 



ZH> 



Hiisiiu'>s I 'I 



lionwPSonr 



1^ 




III 



K.KII11II11H& Ciimiiaiiy Im-.. E.KIUillnii InfuniialHinCcnlor. 

1200 First Colonial Rd. First Virginia Bank Tower 

P.O. Box 4449 101 St. Paul's Blvd. 

VA Beach. VA 23454 NwWk. VA 25510 



•S« ^«^(^• si uf l *F^«4Kt-Ui.'> Ut an t'X|»inmili<4i of {H*K<>nniim-t' infiirnmlHMi 




WhenEEFMton taUcs, people listen. 



't3 A Yeir Of Crielmtion 9 




^' 



TEtHEARTE* 

Mortgage Rates Starting At Just 
Are Now Available For Membera 





NO AppwOsal r«e • NO Prtaf • IfO Vrtpayuunt PwmW— 



FORT EUSTIS 
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 




FORTBmB 



NBNMMEfT SOUTH 



FOm STORY 
42S4KN1 




10 'tSAYearOfCeielmtioa 



After 20 Years, Here We Are Now! 



Hw fioBowiiif infarnuHiaD was compikd and {MtUbh- 
ed by the ^gima Beack Chuober of Camraeice. Bob 
Fentiett. preskieM; BilCeMcr. exeottive dkcctor. 

Wd-kDOwn far hs ejieeOeot qa^y-iiMft, ^bfiiHa 
BcMh hM nadi U> atkt a proipectiye resided. 'Oc 
pteasant cUaiaie. tlie excttiiif and eolightennif aiftit^ 
life, tkc excelknt sdiool system, Ike ixnttiflil 
recrettiaaal divenksm, and the coi«enial neiffetar- 
hoodt, tfl blend to offer a iraique wqr of Hfe tlutt is 
^%gintt Beacb. 

Bacl«i«Hid: Vlrgiiua Beach, located at tbe junction 
of the Chesapeake Bay and tlw islamic Ocean, u 
VirgUft'f lariest dty, with a had vea ot 310 sfj^n 
miks and a pofxibttian at over ^5,000 pctyle. ham 
known m a resort city, Virgfaiia Beach tea a stro^, 
diventfied ecomjmic base th« includes agricutaure, 
consinictioo, retail/wholnale trade, tourism, mami- 
&cturi^ and the oulitaiy. Part oi the Norfolk- Vvgi^ 
Beaeh-Fortsmouth, ^fginia ^atdard Mettopoten 
Statistfeal Area, ^giuaBcai^ it one of the attion's 
fastett growii^ cities. 

Eiwrtw Pubtfc SdmoU— ^gima Beadi's inMc 
school s^tem has <0 schools ser^ii« fl«cr SS,000 
stude^ wkh spedal centers far Ckreer Dewfapaaent, 
TakaMd^and CSlbd Programs and Voettieari-Tech^ 
cal Edncation. Ctasses range from kiadergarten 
through 12th gr^k, and all high schools offer general 
education, college preparatory, and iH^inss and 
vocational courses. AH sdioab are fuUy acaedited by 
the Sti^ and by the Soitthera Assodittion of Cofoges 
lod Spools. 

Hie school term routinely begins the fint week in 
SeiMember and ends in caily June. Kindergarten 



attendance b not d^mpulsary.'lmt kIwoI tttenitance 
between «es 6 and 17 is miuked. 

Piiv^ Schoob— ^gnuB Bea^ has sixteen |»iv«e 
and parecUal tdrndb covera« grades Undergareten 
tteoi^ 12. These stAoofa faidade Omt widi spedfic 
tcl^iaus affiUtfions, and those with special academic 
pragn^. 

Halter Eduction— CoUe^s md uMveisMes m and 
ne«r V^uia Beach indude Co mmanw eaMi GoU^e. 
Tidewater Qanmumty Cdtege, Vnguua Weskyan 
Cottcge, Norfolk &ate Uniwrsity, OU Donmion 
Uuversity, C3N University , ami Eastern Virgima 
KkdkdS^ooL 

A nudier of other ofleges ud universities abo 
maiatuii eAension offoN m the \^Bita Beach area. 

neoMtfw: yitw^mi BeM:h has a tremendow 
tfvcrsky of fccKttenid ucM and activities not fceml a 
my other aty. Ite onst wen-kBom reoci^ond area tt 
te »a&»i flf NWc bn^et, bordering on the 
A^ntk OpMW and Qmjtpeake tey. 

i%jraiH^^MMA also hta a vaikty aipvMc KcreMion 
bottitt b^t^i^: ttece sMc mi nttidnal pvks, 87 
dty pwks, 23 f^^iounds. 148 temM courts, tw> ciQr 
gfitf eomm, nd a ^ nwtaa. IHwo rraei^a eenteis, 
Kcavndle-ud Bow Qcek. round out the vatkty of 
dty-owned reaeational fiuaUtks ava&drte. Aditttianal 
iafcrmatioa is avaiiabk from die Parks A Recreation 
Department. 467-4884. _ 

POl^to naal&aaA acttvjtks found m Wgnua 
BeacA iisdude: ft«sb«vter and sakw^^ &hlng; 
hunting, inchKiwg smrfl gan» ud wttcrftwl; swim- 
ming watersknng; golfi sailuag and powerboatu^; 



bkycbng: camping; racquet sportt; ud a profusion of 
other pastintes. 

Specti^or sports found in and-around Wginia Beadi 
indwk tbe Tidewater TMes IVtirie A ftueball. 
professiomd gdf. professknal tenins, and coUege 
football and bashetbaO.' 

Ubraiks: Ibe Virgink Bewdi IHil^ LSmry s^tem 
has seven kiottions througlraut Vti^inia BeK:h, and is 
open Monday through SaturdiQr. TIm system also has 
bookmoMe service, kdlitks for the Mind, dnkfa-en's 
imgrams, and fflms ud records ta loan. There is also 
a Reference Division ud a Law LUiivy for publk use. 
For additioMi infonii^aa. »B the idmiqr tt 3^5200. 



With its kxiUioB on Ae seaoMst, Wginia 
Bea^ bs a moderitte dmutfe. wkh Janiary average 
temperatures oi40l'¥, aiul Svfy wer^it tempeiatiuts 
of 7S'¥. RainfeU avenge 45 inches a year, with an 
average snowfiiO of 7 inches a year. 

With u average ot 12 feet. ele\«tions in Wginia 
Beac^ vary tomseaJevelto20 feet. Ihe tenaia ranges 
from flat to sUghtly rdUng, with mwfa fennland, 
forests, marshlands, and. of course, 28 miles oi pubUc 
beadles. Principal mtters in and around Virgima Beach 
iittlude the ^taittk Oceu, the Owsiveahe Bay, the 
L^uhaven River, and tte Broad and linkhora Bays, 
and the fresh-water Bade Bay and North Lmiding Mver. 

' Featfvab: Voginia Beach has three major festivals— 
the Virgima Beat* Band Festival, tite Boardwalk Art 
aiow, and the Neptune Festival. 

Ihe nationally known Boardwalk Art Show is heki 
eadi year in June along the Bomdwalk on the 

SeeVir(iiitanicl9 — 



Those Who Made, Make Virginia Beach Strong 



Ce^lMiidoma / ^ 

aiy Sheriff 

Mr. John Marr 1963-1973 

Mr. S. J. Smith 1974-Present 
Oiy Treasarer 

Mr. V.A. Etherid^ 1963-1977 

Mr. John T. Atkinson 1978- Pres^ 
CiRfc ^ C^mit Court* 

Mr. John V. Fentren 1963-1979 

Mr. J. Curtis Fruit 1^)-Present 
Cowkstnner ot Heve— e 

Mr. Ivu D. Mapp 1963-Presenl 
C omm oHweaWi's Allora^ 

Jr. Robert L. Sim{»oa 1963-1967 
r. Andre Evans 19^1^2 
Mr. Paul A. Sciortino 1^2-Praent 

Aiipoialed 
Offidak 
CttyAilonwy 

Mr. Grorge W. Vakos 1%3-1965 
Mr. Harry T. M»shall 1965-1970 
- Mr. J. EHde Bimson 1970- Present 

CHyCkrfc* 

Mr. John V. Fentress 1963-1968 
Mr. Rkhard J. Webbon 1968-1978 
Mrs. Ruth Hodga Smith I979-Pr«ent 

W^CMiaUe 

Mr. Ralph McChesney 1963-1972 
Mr. Horace Shirky 1972-1978 
Mr. Thomas V. Ward 1978-Present 

iMdEatoteAsacHW 

Mr. W. W. CmneU. Jr. 1967-1968** 
Mr. Clyde N. Mmitt 1969-1983- 
Mr. Ckrald Banuu 1M3-Praent 

Dcpyrlaiciit Heads 
D^NH^aMrt af ^^katan 

IXrector: Mr. RIctard CockreH 1963-Prcs^ 
Dcpmrteeirt of OMa Prai^eaiNv 

I^rect<Mr: Mr. C. William Smith. Jr. 

1971-Present 
Departaset ef Ec o a omk Dev clopawit 

Direcuin Kfr. A. kmes Ddc& 1970-PKsn^* 
Department of FlMiacc 

Director: Mr. Giles G. Dodd 1963-Present 
Dc^tftmcnt of Fire 

Director: Chief Edward B. "Bubba" Bayne 



1972-1974** 
- ^' Chkf Harry E. IXed 1974-l^aent 

ttipart Bwt <rf General Sarvtes 

Dkedor: Mr. C Oral Lantot. Jr. 1967-1976** 
Mr. Reeves E. Johnson 1976-Praent 

OcpwtaMM of Menial HcaMi 

Director: Dr. James Wlins. M.D. 1963-1971 
Ik. JranDowhiv. M J>. 1971-1974 
Dr. John B. Aycock. Ph.D. 1874-1977 
Mr. Howard M. CuUum 1977-Pr^Em 

D ep artmen t rf Paila A Mawt itiwi 
Urector: Mr. Harold S. Whitehurst 
I963-Pr«ent 

Department of Pccmlto A Inipcctfoaa 

Diccter: Mr. Robot R. Loher l9'?H>resent** 

D^Mtmut of Pe wonne l 

DiivctOT: Mr. E. Alkn Culvo'house 

1963-1971 

Mr. Aubrey V. Watts, Jr. 1971-1975 

Mrs. PhyHs Hitchto Milktte 1975-Present 

u^wQBCBi M Fwnmng 

Director: Mr. KtastmQmu^ 1963-1967 
Mr. Patrick L. Stud&« 1968-19^ 
Mr. Charles Carrington 1970-1973 
Mr. Robert J. Sc<Mt 1975-Present 

Department of PnHtt ^ 

ENrector: ChkfJamesf.Momc 19^1969 
Chief William W. Davis 1969-1981 
Chkf Charks R. Wall 1981-Present 

DcpartaenI of ftMc HnM 

EXrector: Dr. fckdge May 1963-1974 
Dr. WiUiam B. Crawf<ml 1974-1977 
Dr. G«>iie C. Sjolund 1978-Present 

De^tftacnt of Pafefc LAmta 

Director: Ms. MwpuWt C. Beck 196M970 
Mrs. Martha J. Sam 19H-Prea»t 

Dcpanmeat of PnUk UtfMks 

IXrector: Mr. Lewis Si^ 1963'1967 

Mr. A. Worth Petty 1967-19^ 

Mr. Aid»cy V. Watt, k. 1975.1^^nt 

Department of PiMc Weits 

Dir«:tor: Mr. Richard J. Webbtm 1963-1965 

Mr. Charles Kiley 1965-1968 

Mr. William Fknting 1970-1976 

Mr. C. Oral Lambm. Jr. 1976-Present 

De^rtawnt of Sodid Stfvkcs 

IKivctcv: Mrs. Frantxs S. Efrod 1%3-Present 

Jud]^ 

Juvcnik Court Jirffes 



The Honorabk L. Travis Branch 1963-1968 

lie Hohori^k Robert B. CromweU. Jr. 

Aug. 1%5-Dec. 1965 

The Honwabk Phillip L, Russo 1966-1970 

The Honorabk Mary Spdght 1»6-1970 

The Hcmorabk Thomas Betz 19^1971 

The H<»orable Kenneth Whitehurst 

1970-1971 

The Honorable Fr^erick P. Aucamp 

1972-Present 

The Honorabk Koineth Whitehurst 

1973-1979 

IhelfonoR^jfe J. DavsReed, ni 1979-Present 

The HoncnMe Jolm K. Moore 1980-Piesait 

General natrict Court Jn^^ 

The Hcmorabk Travb BraiKh 1963-1965 

Ttte Honorabk J. Itevis Reed 1963-1966 

The Honorabk Joseph Jantes Itevis 

Apr. 1966-Dec. 1966 

The Honorabk PhUUp L. Russo 1966-1970 

The Honorabk P.B. White 1967-1979 

The Honorabk Henry L. Lam 1969-1973 

The Honorabk Constantine A. ^}aiK}olis 

1975-Present 

The Honorabk R.L.Snnpson,Sr. 1976J>resent 

The HononMe Jotai B. Pie^n 1979^^esatt 

The HmicmUe H. Calvin Spain 1981-Present 

CbcnftCMrtJa^i 

The HMmrabk Robot S. Wahab, Jr. 

1958-1978 

The Honorabk Richard Kdkm 1960-1967 

The Honorabk Geor^ W. Vakos 1967-1974 

The Hoonndik l^wl Ackiss 1967-1976 

The Honorabk Phyj^ L. R^so 1910-Present 

The Hcmorabk Austin E. Onw 1974-Present 

The Honendik Hmy L. Lam 1973-npes^t 

The Honorabk GeoigeW. V4dHX»9M¥Bial 

Tte HoMrabk Kem^th N. WUtehurst. Jr. 

1979-Present 

The HtmonMe Bnnard G. Barrow 

July 1, 1980 

•The p(»itiou of the City Oark & Ckrk of Cir- 
cuit Court were held by the saa^mdividu^ until 
1968. 

**When department was formed 



'83 A Year Of Celebration 11 



EVERGREEN GARDEN 



CENTER 



YOUR ONE STOP GARDEN SHOP 

...AND NURSERY CENTER FOR ALL YOUR 
LAWN AND GARDEN NEEDS ! 



FOR THE DO-IT-YOURSELFER HOME LANDSCAPER- 

BRING US A SKETCH OF YOUR 

LAWN AND WE WILL ASSIST YOU 

FREE IN PLANNING YOUR 

LANDSCAPE! 



FREE Estimates for Complete 
Yearly Lawn Maintenance 



For the person who wants 

a beaotifBl teadscape withont 

the work, let vs 

do it for you! 

FREE ESTIMATES! 



COME IN TODAY 

Wt'rtatllMoonwrof 

KMipwHtoRoMift 

OMUMvHto TurnpilMl 



CwitarvHto 


f Tnpk. 




a 
f 



•* <J 



^ 

^♦^ 



467-7022 

Evergreen Garden Center 

1!H)0 KempsYille Road 

Virginia Beacli, Virginia 



IjA. 



, '■ • ■(' > •■,,•' I 



,.„,^t^nt*^'*^t^J'^'<'^^*^^^^^^^*v?^^^■'-^^'"•^"^' 



12 '83 A Year Of Celebration 



Police, Fire: To Protect And Serve 




The Virginia Beach lire Departnteni conducts many public education aciiviiks throughout th" 
year. One feature is Snufjy the Talking Fireiruck . 




Marine 






wm 



•83 A Year Of Celebration 1 3 



KIMNACH FORD, INC. 



BUY AMERICAN SALE 






Your Tidewater Dealer 
For Over 30 Years. 




List 

Disc. 

YOUR PRICE $5,626 



$6,287 
$661 



^yrd 



KIMNACH FORD 

640 E. VIRGINU BEACH BLVD. 

(just Off Newtown Rd. Exit) 

461-6401 



ife^ 





eaiacK 




Virginit Beach in 1889 b«d tv ana sutcen 

oouuet on the ocean. Vm ttrs: j the narrow 
MHtfe railroad which ran fiwn Broad Creek near 
I^ar^k wu at the rear of the old PrinGeis Aane Hotel 
■t Sixteenth Stieet. Ito etaborate hotel, buih by the 
same compwjy that financed tlie raifroKi to the resort, 
was a large buikHng, elaborately ftimished and 
boasting electricity, elevators and steam heat. 

fbt fcur story shingled building was bedecked with 
towers, bay wfaukws and verwdas. Tliere was a lawn 
wbkh was protected from the sea by a rough Mg wtt 
and a boardwalk. 

This hotel, which remained open all year, bunied in 
1907 but prior to that many fiunous people had been 
miests. Ne» the taiel Md toward Rttd<tee Wet was the 
first anmsement asiiKJ. Tfcere nw a canal that, 
connected UnUiom Bay and Ikm Ifte. 

During the past »eve«y yews Vt^s^ Beach has 
grown to be as^ar 'round coBBMnity and is now one of 
the ifflportam WMtion pi((a» on the Atlantic coast. 
Long befere ^rgi^ Beach received its present name it 
im ealted Seat^k. A small Mitaniaity to the west of 
the resort stiU bears this mmt, to the W4r cf 1812 
Bti^h ships off the coast s^ted tU area and the 
Qxmty mOtiA TO5t a lawUii* party, "Hiew was an 
engagenant between the ^MAans and ftriiish. 
Because of this "sea attKik" the j^ace was called 
Scftt&ck* 

tn 1978 a Life Saving station was built on the coast at 
present day 25th Street. The men and their fiunilies 
lived about the station which bow the name Seatack. 

Agfoup of Norfolk business men built a clubhouse in 
1880 at what is now I7th Street. They gave the resort 
the name Virginia Beach. 

to 1963 there was a merger rftlw town of Virginia 
Bead! awl the entire area «f Wm»ss Ani« County 
famm »*** » «dvert»«d as "Tlie World's largest 
Sesort aty." toto this new nwfiMp<& ^%W) «W tow 
traffic from the kw Cbes^jedce ^ Mil^e-TVmnel 
telling a treoMiKtoM potential tat growth to the new 

city. 

During the past decades there has been a change in 
this area from rich truck ferming countryside to an area 
<rf surburban homes, taking the place of the scattered 
old settkmenu that date back to the seventeenth 
cemury. to late 1890s there were 1,432 truck fanm 
(today there are less than 300). These farms produoid 
and shipped to northern markets thousands of barTels 
of fresh ftuh and vegetables throughout Ihe year. The 



Virginia B«acii Pitliiiig Pi«r 



I 

I 



pip*«p*^^"i^^*^^*'^** 




ja Attack 



m )i^i camatv »>>" mou'v »v«l alkwed the ^^^v cf 
three separate crops a year. Winter spinaA a^ otter 
greens were frown in the area. Mnceti Ai^ 'nuteyi 
were i^oiut and before the days of control of i^ Me 
game in the farm of veniion. oppossiun, nMrit, wild 
duds and geese, as well as quail, were tam^ht to 
market by huntera and trappers. 

The seafood industry was important to tlM emUf as 
it is today. The long coastline, ChesapeaiBe tu^, and 
Lynnhaven River yielded richly ot crabs, fish, ^kbu 
and oysters. The renowned Lynnhaven 0^^ mm 
gourmet's delight in New York and ebewheie fa tite 
north. A fisvorite outing for NorfaUdans in the ninettes 
was a ride by a train to Cape Henry to have a AiiMr of 
roost oysters at O'Keefe's Resuurant and tlwn M ctbiri) 
the great white sand dunes. 

In l^itere ^re huge forests in RvMess Aime 
aMtttf.f*oin virgin giowA were^rt bi«e trws <rfoalE, 
{m», (xdut, ami cnvess. Saw mills huBunedwd many 
feet (rf taraber was sUj^ ftom tte logtfi* ouips. 

The ro«ls of the tiirc famished little in the way erf 
transpcrtMun. SoM were built of <^tcr sheik, t^se 
we« usually toB rowls. Others became a sea of mud in 
the winter. Peq^ depeirfed on boats ai^ «Bb«A to 
get to!*irMkm»tots. Trains were im out rftown to 
Virglaia Be»A «Bd Qm Henry and down as fcr as 
MwOm IWw on Qimtwk Stourrf. Nwfalk Iw^rs 
with case* in the eiwrt in ftii^s Anne Oomty we« 
(kiwnoB titee«ly nwai^ train and if the case tad Ml 
been flitfsWIJv the ttae the afteraoM trato toNorWk 
arrived. fl»y wer* farwl to remain owrtght tt 
Priwsss AiB» Court Howe. Thu soth jAws kt 
hddi^ Qsortta tte county wm baite In 1K24. ft is now 
the civic anter for th« ww city of ^%gima Bew*. 
new c^ <rf VirginMi Beidb. 

After Ae Ovil War ttere ms a tinw ci defffesaiSD. 
Mmy <rf the great j^mn^em thtt mn two tamped 
years oM had to be sold. Weatthy persons ffom weatera 
New Ycrt Sttte bOB«l« Virg io» jrfartttiom as w«er 
reskteoces and estaWBsted <tairy tems. Pe^wok^ 
Bayville. SummerviUe (now Thalia), Ferry Farm rad 
LawsoD Hail were all soJd out "f the famflies that bad 
owned them for generations. ,^ u „«^ 

llif^gicat area now in the Sesisnwc &»tc Park wa* 
called the Desert at the turn of the century, to this 
forest p anemade stills flourished. It was also 

a great huwm* area with bear, deer "^ ^t^'" 
abundance. —Mrt. W. EmmtHM^-, 



VirfiMa 



Historical 
Maritino 





16 '83 A Year Of Celebration 



20 Years Of Leaders 



CITY COUNCIL 
CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA' 
JtLY 1, 19S2-JtNE30, 1984 
John A. Biuiti, Blackwater Borough, July I, 
1980 - June 30, 1984; Mrs. Nancy A. Creech, at 
large, July i, 1982 - June 30. 1986; Harold 
Heischobcr, at large, July 1, 1980 - June 30, 1984; 
Vice-Mayor Barbara Murden Henley, Pungo 
Borough, July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1986; Jack Jen- 
ninp, Lynnhaven Borough, July 1; 1982 - June 
30, 1986; Mayor Louis R. Jones, Bayside 
Borough. July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1986; Robert G. 
Jones, at large. July 1, 1982 - June 30. 1986; 
William H. Kilchin, III, Virginia Beach Borough. 
July 1, 1980 - June 30, 1984; Mrs. Reba S. Me- 
Clanan, Princess Anne Borough, July 1. 1980 - 
June 30. 1984; J. Henry McCoy. Jr., D.D.S., 
Kempsville Borough, July 1. 1982 - June 30, 1986; 
Mrs. Meyera E. Obcrndorf, at large July I, 1980 - 
June 30, 1984 



wrih I h I 



JULY 1, 1976 -JUNE 30, 19W_ 

Dr. Clarence A. Holland. Mayof 
Patrick L. Standing. Vice-Mayor 
John A. Baum Robert B. Cromwell, Jr. 

George R. Ferrcll John R. Griffin 

Dr. J. Henry McCoy, Jr. Meyera E. Oberndorf 
J. Curtis Payne R.L. "Buddy" Riggs 

Floyd E. Watcrfield. Jr. 

JULY 1, 1974 -JUNE 30, 1976 

J. Curtis Payne, Mayor 
George R. Ferrcll, Vice-Mayor 
John A. Baum Robert H. Callis. Jr. 

Robert B. Cromwell. Jr. Charles W. Gardner 
John R. Griffin Dr. Clarence A. Holland 

Dr. J. Henry McCoy, Jr. Patrick L. Standing 

Floyd E. Waterfield, Jr. 

JULY 1. 1972 - JUNE 30, 1974 

Robert B. Cromwell, Jr., Mayor 
Reid Ervin, Vice-Mayor 
John A. Baum Robert H. Callis, Jr. 

George R. Ferrell Charles W. Gardner 

Dr. Clarence A. Holland D. Murray Malbon 

J. Curtis Payne Donald H. Rhodes 

Floyd E. Waterfield, Jr. 

SEPTEMBER 1, 1970 — JUNE 30, 1972 

Donald H. Rhodes, Mayor 
Earl M. Tebault, Vice-Mayor 
Robert H. Callis, Jr. Robert B. Cromwell, Jr. 
Frank A. Dusch Reid Ervin 

George R. Ferrell ' Dr. Clarence A. Holland 

D. Murray Malbon J. Curtis Payne 

Floyd E. Watcrfield, Jr. 

SEPTEMBER 1%7** 

* Frank A. Dusch, Mayor 

Robert B. Cromwell, Jr., Vice-Mayor 
Albert L. Bonney George R. Ferrell 

D. Murray Malbon Lawrence E. Marshall 

John W. McCombs J. Curtis Payne 

G. Dewey Simmohs Earl M. Tebault 

Kenneth N. Whitehurst 



SEPTEMBER 1966 

Frank A. Dusch. Mayor 
S. Paul Brown. Vice-Mayor 
Albert L. Bonney Edeard T. Caton, III 

James G.Darden L. Stanley Hodges 

W. Hugh Kitchin Uwrence E. Marshall 

John W. McCombs Earl M. Tebault 

Kenneth N. Whitehurst 

SEPTEMBER 1965 

Frank A. Dusch. Mayor 
S. Paul Brown. Vice-Mayor 
Edward T. Caton. HI James G. Darden 

L. Stanley Hodges W. Hugh Kitchin 

Uwrence E. Marshall John W. McCombs 

Swindell Pollock Earl M. Tebault 

Kenneth N. Whitehurst 

JUNE 30, 1964 

Frank A. Dusch, Mayor 

S, Paul Brown, Vice-Mayor 

Edward T. Caton, III James G. Darden 

L. Stanley Hodges W. Hugh Kitchin 

ence E. Marshall John W. McCombs 

Swindell Pollock Earl M. Tebault 

Kenneth N. Whitehurst 

JUNE30,1963 

Frank A. Dusch, Mayor 

S. Paul Brown, Vice-Mayor 

Edward T. Caton, III James Darden 

LrStanley Hodges W. Hugh Kitchin 

Uwrence E. Marshall John W. McCombs 

Swindell Pollock James E. Snyder 

Kenneth N. Whitehurst 



COUNTY OF PRINCESS ANNE 

VIRGINIA BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 

DECEMBER 31, 1962 

S. Paul Brown. Chairman 
Carrol G. Clough James G. Darden 

Swindell Pollock James E. Snyder 

Kenneth N . Whitehurst John V . Fentress, Clerk 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

CITY COUNCIL 

DECEMBER 31, 1962 

Frank A. Dusch, Mayor 

John W. McCombs. Vice-Mayor 

Edward T. Caton, 111 L. Stanley Hodges 

W. Hugh Kitchin 

•City Council - July 1. 1980 - June 30, 1982 - 
John /^ Baum (Blackwater), Reid Ervin (At-large), 
Harold Heischober (At-large), Barbara Murden 
Henley (Pungo), Dr. Clarence A. Holland. M.D. 
(Bayside), William Hugh Kitchin, III (Virginia 
Brach), Reba S. McClanan (Princess Anne), Dr. J. 
Henry McCoy, Jr., D-D.S. (Kempsville), Donald 
W. Merrick (Lynnhaven), Meyera E. Oberndorf 
(At-large). Patrick L. Standing (At-large). 
♦♦September 1%8 and September 1969 are the 
same as September 1967. 



Oceana Joins Celebratic^ 



City Hall Fun continued from page « 

Kt'^^jr^r'sp^". B«k.cper. 

Waterfield Carving, and Farrier (horseshoe maker). 

s3 AM«ctl««: 4-H aowns. 4-H Talent Demon- 
strate eluTgrass Band. Hay rides, and Pony ndes 

^''{b'ffiLatlon C-ter. 19th and P«nfic Avenue - 
ooen house 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. „ , .. 

•Dunk Tank Beneflt; Dunk a V.I.P.. benefit of the 
Davis Comer Volunteer Rescue Squad; games area. 

•Voter Ibgistivtion: Specially approved voter regis- 
tration day offers a unique opportunity for residents to 
reSr: General Registrar's Office, Agriculture and 
Voter Registrar Building. 

•Hatorkal Slide Show: A multi-media production of 
Virginia Beach's first 20 years. Prepared by the 
Department of Economic Development and the 
School-Media Center; Qty Council Chambers, Gty HaU 

Building. . „ . m 

•Stop, Drop and RoH aiHl Fire Drening CoBte«tt for 
CUMrea. The Professional Fire Fighters Association 
show children what to do in case their dothes Mtch on 
fire and give them a chance to dress like a fire fighter; 
fire display area. , ^ i_ a 
•life, Be in It: the Department of Parks and 
Recreation will have games and contests ranging from 
frisbee and public volleyball to greased pole dimbing; 
games area. . _._^^ 



>' 



This month the Qty of 
Virginia Beach observes 
the 20th anniversary of 
the merger of Princess 
Anne County and the Gty 
of Virginia Beach with a 
week-long celebration 
April 24-30 

As a vital and integral 
part of Virginia Beach's 
fast growth and prospe- 
rous economy, Naval Air 
Station Oceana, a proud 
resident siiMX the city's 
inception, plans to sup- 
port the 20th anniversary 
celebration in several 
ways. 

The nuijor event beiiig 
planned by NAS Oceana is 
a rouiul of guided tours of 



the station from 1-4 p.m. 
on Wednesday April 27. 
Tours will begin at 1 p.m. 
at the picnic grounds near 
the main entrance to the 
station just off Oceana 
Boulevard. The Royal 
London Wax Museum on 
Atlantic Avenue has 
donated its red, London 
double-decker bus for the 
tours. Round trip tours 
will be made every half- 
hour with the last tour 
departing the [Ncnic area 
at 3:30 p.m. and returning 
with all visitors U 4 p.m. 
Tours will include the 
fighter aircraft parking 
ramp with a brief stop at 
the station's ^ Opera- 



tions tower building. 
There, guests may disem- 
bark the bus and inspect 
attack and fighter jet air- 
craft on static display and 
talk with assigned flight 
crews. 

NAS Oceana plans to 



display a photographic 
montage depicting the 
stations's growth and acti- 
vity over the years during 
the "Qty HaU Day" event 
on April 30 and will enter 
the sution's A-4 Skyhawk 
jet fighter float in the 
"Qty HaU Day" Parade. 



ANSWERS FROM PAGE 6: 


1- Robert CaUls 


6-Reid Ervin 


2 -F.E. Waterfield 


7-G.R.FerreU 


3 -D.W.Merrick 


8 - R. B. CromweU, Jr. 


4-R.L. Riggs 


9 -E. T.Buchanan, III 


S-PatStandii« 


10 -J. C.Payne 



Beach History c..«.....~...... 

cil approves Lynnhaven Mall. Fire Training Center 
opens. The only nationally-reported Bi-Centenial riot 
takes place on oceanfront. 

1977 - Beach ranked nation's fourth fastest growing 
city. Virginia Beach Recreational Center Kempsville 
opens. School Administration building dedicated. 
Restrooms at 17th Street completed. Virginia Beach 
receives awared in natinwide "America'.s Votingest 
City" contest. 

1978 - Council approves acquisition of Munden Point 
park. Corrections Center opens. Oceanfront Branch 
library opens, replacing old branch. Beach begins Clean 
Commercial System Program. Social Services. Building 
renovations completed. Night meetings for City Council 
started. 

1979 - Old Coast Guard building ownership tran- 
sferred to city. Council approves Dune Protection or- 
dinance. Beach ranks 69th in natin in productivity of 
hogs. Beach ranked third fastest growing city in nation. 
Haygood Fire Station dedicated. Operations Building 
opens. Fire Training Center dedicated. Operations 
Building opens. Fire Training Center dedicated. 
Virginia Beach Recreation Centr Bow Creek opens. 
Robert S. Wahab Public Uw Library dedicated. Coun- 
cil approves Virginia Beach Boulevard expansion to 
four lanes. Potter's Pence removed. 

1980 - Snow storm of the century. Virginia Beach 
transit service begins operations at the oceanfront. Arts 
and Conference Center, the Pavilion, opens. 
Renovation of City Hall Building completed. 
Restrooms at 30th Street completed. City's Volunteer 
Job Bank begins. 

1981 - Census puts Virginia Beach second largest city 
in Virginia. Beach ranked 1 1th in growth among cities in 
the United States. Severe water shortage plagues city. 
Lynnhaven Mall opens. Pavilion Towers construction 
begins. The Pavilion is dedicated. Charles Wall appoin- 
ted police chief. 

1982 - Four new members elected to City CouncU, in- 
cluding new mayor Louis R. Jones. City manager 
George Hanbury, an eight-year veteran, is fired; he is 
replaced by Austin, Texas City Manager Thomas 
Muehlenbeck. Charles Tinker takes command of NAS 
Oceana. Ground is broken for new Seatack Fire Station. 
Virginia Beach listed as one of nation's 10 best. 

Something For Everyone 

Continue From Pane 3 

Most city council members and city officials plan to 
be on hand to greet Qty Hall Day visitors. Tours are 
planned for a number of buUdings including the heating 
plant, greenhouse, water tower, sewage treatment 
plant. Correction Facility, and Public Safety Building. 
Gty equ'pment ranging from antique fire engines to a 
modern TV truck will be on display as will the 
NightingiJe Air Ambulance. 

Four local radio stations wiU broadcast from the site 
and more than a doaxn concessionaires wiU provide a 
variety of food. Some picnic talbes are available at the 
Municipal Center. Comptete schedules of events wUl be 
available from information booths located throughout 
the complex. Visitors may choose to explore on their 
own or join tour groups which wiU be formed at regular 
interval. 



wfi?' 



'83AYaurOfCelebraUon |7 



A Castle Ful 




LAYAWAY THAT GYM SET NOW! 

10% Down and Payment Twlc» A Month Thru Juiw 10, 1^63 

M 



Qalva-Kote 
l»g Gym Set 




Strawberry Shortcake 

2 Regular Swings. QHde Ride, 2-Pas- 
•Miger Lawn S^Mng. 



Reg. low Disc. Price 
139.96 



GymSet 

(Not Ohw'i 



108 



^^ •49643 Price 129.96 

*E.T. ami the E.T character are tradeniaflcs oi 
and Itdenaed Vy Universal City Stwtios. Inc. 
01982 Universal City Studios, Inc. 
All rights reserved. 



NULINE WOODEN 
BABY SWING 

g99 



Sa(»-Fun 
For Btbi 



Reg. low D 
Price 11 



Reg. low 

DUc. Price 

189.96 



2 Sling Seel Swings. QMe RMe. 
4 Peaesngsr Lawn Swing, Tutxi- 
lar Trapeze. 



99 





*1164> 



TowtrOymStt 

2 air ood swings, 2 seirter 
sky gide, 2 pwson lawn 
•«vlng, 1 chin tier, ptaHorm 
tower— -8'2" high, 9' nu n^,^ 
entry slide ««. Prtc 



199" 



Hemi-Sphere Dome 
cumber m^^^g^ 

4g99 



Reg. low DIec. Price 
5g.9e 

Horee Gym Set 
or 6 Leg Set 

99«9 

Reg. 109.ge 

mmt 



#32223&niirf* OymSet.reg. low 139.96.. .119.00 
#12123 Gym Set. reg. low 69.96 59.96 




Gym Dandy Sport* Center 

For dMsloplngslnMObodtae PUIS £[tQ^ 
Meoltunl W9 

Reg. low 

Disc. Pitos 

7«.ge 




a4aSM tMURF* POOL 

• Size: 45" X 9* ^ 

• QaNon capacity: 35 Rsg. low 

Disc. Price 

ucoaeo fv wMiAce WRNE a 00. 



TOV^A^TI F 



' 



18 '83 A Year Of Celebration 



m 



A Year of 
Celebrations 





ITHi Street Surf 
and Bikini Shop 



MEN'S SWIM WEAR 






QUICKSILVER 
RIP CURL & MOOR 


LADIES SWIM WEAR 
GIDEON OBERSC^ 
SASSAFRASS 






CONNIE BANKU 





SURF& ACCESSORIES 

SCROFF BOARDS 

CANYON CUSTOM SURFBOARDS 

LOCAL MOTION BOARDS 

TOWN & COUNTRY SURF DESIGNS 



! QlflMSIfLVIilR 



CANYON 

CUSTOM SVRFmtA RIK - SAN DIEGO 




wmmmm 



*t3AYearOfCeM>ration 19 




Tm& PATDJKm — Viqinia's Pronkr CmventiM Cemet, Located Off The Bx- 
IHtssway, Naur The Ocom 



Virginia Beach c<»ii,»«iftomi>..eio 

oceanfrant. Ihe four-day event draws artists and art 
a{q>redatcrs frcm all tn/ti the eastern half erf the natkn. 

Hm Nei^i^ Festival, sponsored by tlK Chy and tlw 
Chanber <rf Commerce, is a week-long festi^ of 
pageantry and t^iebration, coraptete with King 
NeiHune and a Cororation Ball. A wide variety <rf 
shows, music, food, and community events filb the 
week of cekbnttioD in Virginia Beach. i. 

^Mi to lliit: A brochure— ^rginia Beach, a 
Self-Ouided Motor Tour— is available at the Chamber 
oflice. The tour gives a map and a listing (rfjpdnts of 
interest that wiU help the new resident get acquainted 
with tlw city and surrounding area. 

FlMuidri IwliiMlaH: Virginia BeKh a served by 12 
commercial banks with over 60 branch oi^xs located 
throughout the community. 

Hiere are 12 savings & loans with 32 bruiches in 
Virginia Be»di. 

Several major credit unions also have offices within 
the city. 

A listing (rf tanks and savings ft ksens is available tt 
the Omiber ofltoe. 

Ckwcfect: Alt m^ deiKminations, and many 
smaller ones tat rei^esemed by the approximately 150 
churches and synagc^ues in ^^iginia Beach. 

CaouN^eatioM: Virginia Beach is served by six 
tetevsioo sti^om inch^ing afBlistes (rf CB' , ABC, 
NBC, F1^', 81^ CBN. C^le TV is now avaOabte m most 
areas of ^ginia Beadi. Ihe city is also served by over 
30 AM and FM radio sutions, with a wide variety in 
p, programming. 

Two dafly newsfuqijera serve Vnginia Beadi, the 
Virginin^nkit (mornings and Sundays) and the Ledger 
Star (evenings except Sumky). A supidemeitt for anfS 
about Virginia Beach, tl» "Beacon" is imblished three 
times weekly, and is iwluded with both newspapers. 
For subscription information, aJtt or write Circulation 
Deinrtment, Vffginian Klot/Ledger aar, 150 W. 
Branbleton Avenue. Norfolk, VA 23510, 804-6^-1303. 

The city is also served by a nupor weeUy newspaper, 
the Virginia Beach Sun, and many siMUer ne«hbor- 
hood weekly and special interest ne««pi«jerstion far 
the Stm can be ooMexHsd at VhiWa leach Su, 131 
mmtmmi itad. VhfWa Beadi, VA 234n, IM- 

^"tlSlal Qw: Virginia Beach has two hcsptals, 
Baysicte Hosptal witii 250 beds and Virgaua Bwdi 
GeW^ Hospitid wiih 263 beds. Both hosprtals are m 
eo^nd to haotBe medical and surgical cases, and 
boOtaw physkam-staflied 24-hour emergency room 

^' ^^cal and ^gical fadUties are also auMHe in 
hos^Sin N^^. and the Eastern Virgnrfa 

Be(ttcal Schod. . -,0., 

Several hundred pliysiciaM.smgeflmandsjraJrts 

in aU branches of me«Bctae offer their prrfesuo^ 
servkes. Newly arrived reside^ "T J^^SSi? 
referral services of the Virginia Beach Medical Society, 

'X^i^'^ Ahnost all «ti««Uy ^tJttrf^ 
Be«^. as weU as local church, school, social, avic. and 
^•^wSS^ciamberofa^mer^ maimains 



a list of these orgamzations at itt office. ChU tlw 
Chunber irt 490-1221 far fortlKr infannatkn. 

Sbopphit: Over 40 shopi»i^ oenten Md raaUs are 
k)cated throughout Vugi^ Beach, featuring a wkie 
spectrum of stores to fit the meds d the whofe femily, 
induding AsUonaUe boutiques, national and regkmal 
deputoMM storas, «nd nmnerous specialty steres. 

Virginia Beach grocery %hoppcn are well served by 
major supermarkets and comenience stares, strategi- 
cal^ kxtted near major residential areas throughout 
the city. 

Air— ten airiines serve Norfalk/Vir- 




Art Fun 



ShMT. SpoMMcd ^ Mm 
tracts tlw«i«i«^ 



far H's Boavdwali Art 
■each Arts Ccater, it 



ginia fieadi Intematkiial Airport, wkh owny (toect 
nights to major cities. Umoaine, taxi, and rental car 
services MB available at the urport. 

Bus-biterstate— Both Greyhound and TVariways 
have statkxu in Virgiua Bea<^. 

Mass Ttanstt— Bus servk* for the metropohtan area 
is provkted by TMewater Regkmal Transit, aervmg 
most major caridors. For fare and route infomutK». 
caU TOT at 623-3222. . 

Motor Vehkies— New reskknts must obtam a 



^ginia driver's Uceittc and Virginia Ucense plates 
within 60 days after moving instate. Written and eye 
tests are required for the (friver's Hcense; call for 
ckxunMnts required far issuance of Virgima plates. Ihe 
Vtfgmia Diviskm <rf Motor Vehkdes is kxated at 229 
Mustang Trail, 461-1919. 

An annual state inspertion is required « aU veluctes, 
and is performed at many servia stations. 

The aty of Virgmia Beach requires a vehicle hcense 
sticker, which can be purchased at any df the four Qty 
Treasurer's offices. Call 427-4445 for the location 
nearest you. , ^ ... 

Jmm»: Personal Property— mchides motor velucaes, 
boats and trailers— the current rate is $6 per $100 
valuation, wtth valuation at 50* of market value, 
yieUing an effeetiw rate of $3 per $100. 

Real Esutc— $.80 per $100 of fair market vahiej 
Saks Tax— 4<!% (restaurantt— 9%); Sttte Personal 
Income— 2— 5^4%; Other tax and local taxes may 

apply. _, 

IMiMcs: Water/Sewer— PubUc UtiUties Depart- 
mem. City of Virginia Be«tth-427-463l; Electric/GM 
—Virginia Ekctric ft Power Company-428-5222; 
Tekphone-C ft P Tekphone-466-3000. Continental 
Tekphone-427-9911; Garbage-Servke provided 
once a week by Oty of Virginia Beach-427-4201 . 

Emplflgrmeat: Virginia Beadi's employment is 
relatively stable, due to its diversified economic base. 
Ma^x empfoyers by category are: retail/whoksale 
trade; servke indwtries; kical, state and federal 
government, incli^Iing military; finan<x, insurance and 
real esute; construction; and manufacturing. 

Few private empfoyers in Virginia Beach em{doy over 
1,000 peqpk, with most busimss emptoying 250 peopk 
or less. 

h is strongly suggested tiutt persons interested in 
moving to Virgima Beadi have empkyn^nt arranged, 
or at kast have initial contacts made before they arrive. 

For detaUed infamuttkn on current empkiyment 
opportunitks, omsuh the ckusified columns of the 
kx»l newspapers, w omtact: Vuginia Empkiyment 
Commission. 5145 E. Vugima Beach Boukvard, 
Norfdk, VA 23502. 804-461-1446. 

Hbtiirfe and Oytaral Aclhrilks: ^%ginia Beach's 
cultural life is rkh and varkd. fai the performing aru, 
Virginia Beiu;h and the swrounding dtks are home for 
the Virginu l^i^e Company, Virginia Opera Associa- 
tion, Virginia Orchestra Group. Virginia Pops Orche- 
stra, and Tkkwater Dmxt Hxater. Many touring 
stage companks make perkxhc stops in the area. 

Vu-ginia Beach rad its neighbcn are 1^0 home for 

many historic and cultiffal centen. including the 

Virgima Beadi Arte Center, the Virginia Beach 

Markteie tfistorical Museum, the Chryskr Museum, 

die MacArthur Memoriid Museum, and Ute Hermitage 

Nfaueum. — jw. 

VollBt Wbrantka: General Registrwr's Office— 

427^667 

OdKR Qty taformation Line— 427-4111; Hampton 
Roaib infarmation Center— 625-4543. 

EMrgeacy Servlws: PoUce/Fire/REscue 911; Vir- 
ginia Beach General tteiMtal- Emergency Room 
481-8262; Bayside Itospital— Emergency 9sxm 460- 
8137; Poison Contrd Center 489-5288; Sute PoUce 
420-3410; Coast Guard 484-8192. 



20 •SJAYearOfCekbrition 



BARRS PHARMACY 



201 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

Virginia Beach, V A 23451 

428-1211 



Mi 



We've Gome A Long Way 

To Serve 
Virginia Beach 




Exterior Bwts, April 1983 



YOU KNOW WE ARE HERE TO STAY 

SER VING VIRGINIA BEACH FOR 60 YEARS 



m 



•83 A YMtf Of Celebration 21 



CHyflaUBiiiMIng 
(A) 

aty AtttMBcy - open. 

Cfty Conacil Ckaiaben - slide i^esentation on 
Virginia Beach's first 20 years. Every half hour from 10 
a.m. - 3:30 p.m. 

aty MttUfcr's OOkt - open. 

Oly Treaaarcr - open. 

DHMriitloMr of the Revcnae - open. 

Eiftmi'— ** Devcioi^Beat - display. 

nauMC • display. 

Mayttr's Office - visit with members of the Virginia 
Beach Qty Couyncil. 

Vtnenttl • &|riay. 

Bpid EiMte AncsMV - disiday. 



Uwrtt 

(F) 

Orarit Coart - tours and dononstrations. 

Geiwnd DbMct Cout - open. 

JavcaMc tad Doacslk Rdattou Coarl - displays, 
tours, and Tilms and presenutions (Also see Schedule 
of Events). 

Lav Ittrary - open. 

CoauBoawcaHli's Attoraey (XBec 

(O 



Tours. 



AgrkaltBK aad Gcacral Regbtrar 
(H) 



Data ProccMiBg walking/talking equipmoit, tours, 
displays and fikn. 

Geaend Services - display (Abo see Oty Services 
Equipment Ksplay). 

Graati Office • open. 

ftra^ aad hspcctiOM - ^pstoys. 

flaniaf DepartBKBt - display. 

Piptettv aai Dbtofkatka - toiu . 

raMe UlilitlM - an "original" outhouse, wwldog 
lund pump, displays, coa#uter quizzes and handeias. 
(Also see Oty Services Equipment DisMay). , 

PabHc WflfiB - Traffic ^ineering dbplay (Abo see 
Cby Services Equipment Display). 



Geacffri Ifegbtrv . displays and special voter 
regis tn^jn. 

AgricaMarc - petting zoo. eqid|Hnent display, plant 
clmic, master food preserver booth and pressure canner 
tester. Arabian Dress Horse, and displays (Also see 
Farmer's Market Schedule). 



OecapaOoaal HmMi 



Open. 



Open. 



(D 



(O 



Tours aiid displays. 



GartccdaaCkBler 

Display and guided tours at 9:30 a.m., 10 a.m. uid 
3:43 p.m. 



(K) 



Hmn - bondwalk train wiD provide tramportioica 
torn laftnNttMMi Booth OB Matijqxaii Drive - free innc 
tree sMdUngs. 



Tottta. 



d^ 



(E) 

Guided toon (roia 11:30 a.m, initl 3:30 p.m. oo Ae 
half hour. &iui|HaMnt and displays hi police disptty ^^^^ 
area. 



(M) 




This Page 
Is Sponsored 

By Peter 
KwkkPrinting 
Copying, See 

Map Of 
Virginia Beach 

Municipal 
Center 

Complex 

On Page 4 



PHbHe Inforauitiaa Office 

(N) 

Display, open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Fire Departncat DUfriay Area 

Contests, equipment displays (new and antique), 
Sniffy the talking fire truck, displays, audio-visual 
presentations, and drills. 

Emergcacy Medical Services 

Demonstrations, equipment displays — including 
Mghtingale Air Ambulance and other displays (^o 
see Schedule of EvenU). 



PabHcHeritli 



Displav. 



City Hall Day 
Display Tents 

Community Services Board. 
Landscape Services - Slide Presentation (Also see 
Qty Services Equipment Display). 
Rendletoo Child Services Center. 
Virginia Beach Mos<piito Control Commissions. 
Department of Social Services. 

Virginia Beach Artt CeMer. 

Virginia Beach Maritime Kstorical Museum. 

Navtf Air Station Oceana. 

Vwfinla Air Station Oceana. . „ ^„ 

Virginian Pilot; Udger Star; Virginia Beach Beacon. 

Housing aad Commuiuty Development. 

Department Vdtmteer CoundL 

Virainia Museum of Marine Sdencc. 



CUvHaUDay^ 
Munk^ Center Tours 

Condacted tours of BiUldings and Offices will begin 
at eaeb buikiing Ikted bekw every ooe-faalf hour from 
10 a.m. un^ 3:30 p.m. unless otherwise indicated. 

Chy Hall Building (Buikiing A). 

Coan Area (Building F). 

Operations Buikiing (Buikiing B). 

(keenhouse (Boardwalk train will provide transporu- 
tion from Information Booth on Mattapooi Drive). 

Water Tower. 

Cburthouse Drive Sewer Treatment Plant (Pump 

Stations). 
Heating Plant. 

CorrecUoo Facility (9:W a.m.; 10 a.nj.; and 3:45 
p.m.) (Building D). 

PubKc Safety Buikiing (1 1:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. on the 
half hour) (l^ildingE). 

Health Department. 

Agrkulture Department (Building H). 

School Administration (Buikiing Q. 



Off Site Toara 

Tour of Courthouse Water Tank. 



City Hall Day 
Special Attractions 

The U.S.^vy's Chuting Stars. 
Snuffy the Talking Fire Engine. 
»gh's Ikit Air BaUoo. 
The Mghtingafc Air Ambulance, 
litter Oiturs. 
Punkin POob the Clown. 
Ski, the 7-11 Ck>wn. 
Cmker McGruff. 
Wendy from Wendy's. 
lUcwater Joeys. 
AUantk Coca Cola Rc^t. 
Smokey the Bear. 
Yogi Ekar from Kings Dominion. 
•SpsM» Walk. 
'Train Rkles. 
•Fee required. 



< 



22 '83AYearOfCeicb^tion 




Virginia BeachStrip 

i 

r 



MALCOLM C. MACDONALD 

428-2000 



300 Twenty-fourth Street 
Virginia Beach, VA 



Virginia Beach Blvd. 

Near Rofsemont Road 




PETER R. FRANGENBERG 

3707 Virginia Beach Blvd. Suite 201-C 



Virginia Beach, VA 



463-1142 




B Q 





Call Once. And for all. 




NATIONWIDE 
INSURANCE 

Nationwide is On Your Side 



Nationwide MutttiU Insurance Company 
Nationwide Mutual Fire Insurance Company 
Nationwide Life Insurance Company 
H^ri^l^e: Cillnim^^ Ohio 







Chesapeake 



VINCENT E. HECHT 



4317 E. Indian River Road 
Chesapeake, VA 



420-2468 



I ' i j 



Norfolk 
Near Military Highway 




laWNETH L. POLH 



1373 E. Little Creek Road 
Norfolk, VA 



480-1677 



'13 A Yctf Of Celebration 23 




Mt. Trashmore Sailing 



Dwiif ttc wlaltr tkc city 
MivM M a locallM for local 
tiWMa,kattotlwlBkc. 



Mt. TnAmon 
Mdlon to take aot to 



The Virginia Beach Sun 
Congratulates The City 
Of Virginia Beach On Its 
20th Anniversary 





A Year Of 
Celebrations 

Virginia Beach 



tmmm 



24 'SSAYearOfCeidmtion 



Look what Wheats 

uptonow. 



+300 



Percentage 
Gain/Lo^ 




Oimidative Percentage Change 



Hie Monitored Portfolio, 
S&P 500, Six Years at a 

\^'ve got quite a track reooid. 

Ov«r tmpast six years, our Monitored Portfolio has 
risen 256%. That's 60 times better than die Dow. Eight times 
better dian the S&P 500. 

But then, diat's really not so surprising when you take 
a dose look at Wheat 

As one (tf die laig^ financial services fims in die 
SoiHheast, we have an impi^ve n^work d natioi^ oor- 
resxKxidents, along with a his^y regarded in-hoise research 
sml v/bose sde wxk is to determine which stocks are be^ 
foe our di&its. 

Among the hundreds of stodcs that our t^im ^lalyzes 
and screens, only a handful are chosoi for our Monitoied 
Portft^. These are the sdect few widi the {x^ioitid to (xit- 
shine the rest of die market 

Onoe each stock is uncovered and added to our Port- 
foUo, we tnck itsperformanoe dosdy to ke^ you tq) to date. 
Then, when it's tmie to sdl, we tell vou. 

m that ample. And that oonqriex. 

Wlw not 1^ us tell you more? 

^^"0 tet you in on some of our trade secrets. And well 
sbm you how to use the Monitored Portfotio to he^ you 
adueve your personal investmoit goals. Well also send you 
the lirtest copy of the Momtored Portfolio with up^to-the- 



109 E. Main St. 

Norfolk, Va 23510 

(804)625-4281 



Dow Jones Industrial Average, 
Glance (1/1/77-12/31/82) 

mmute advk^e on what you should be doing in the stock 

market today. 

There's no obl^^on. Mp minimum investment 

Just return die coupon bekny. FbrmsuQr haqjpy returns. 



I 



FdUitlo ktarmon ahaU Wheat-tmi whatyom'n i0 to. Sand myoHr 
fmtlmamdBartfiiubn(kmt.akM^wiAaulaksthhmU^ 

Name ■ ■ 

Adifm 

City 



StaU. 



Z^. 



tfym're a Wheat cUatt pka$e give the mmeefyoKrAaotrnt EumHve 



Brandt C^fice 

MaHto-IXnctorcfllesundi 

Wheat. Firti SeatrUks. He 
BO.BaI.'S7.ltidimm[.VA232i9 
AmtpMeamOfm^aMm^miButfidiotmmmmdatiBmkaml- 



.abki^mnqaea.P^perfi)nmiced0esmtgiianoaeeft^miocess. 



Wheat 



WE NEVER Ft^GET THAT Y(XJ 
COME TOUS TO MAKE MONEY 

MwnbwSIPC 

U20LaskinRd. 

Va. Beadi, VA 23451 

(804)428-0110 



L 



'83AYnfOfCelebraUon n 



ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

Celebrates Virginia Beach 
20th Anniversary 




First Assembly of God 

2222 Old Donation Parkway 

Virgmia Beach. VA 234S4 

481-S005 

PafltorWallyOdiin 



Every Celebration Has To Include Fellowship And 

Worship. Join Us This Sunday As We Proclaim The 

Good News Through The Good Word. 



26 '83 A Year Of Celebration 




;,','' f <' ''''-•' i '(MM I ill ..iMiirt'ii •f'*! .1.' ;-'■ 
''■'"' ' I' 'i •'/ ^ ,. m'/ M'/t' i- 

Introducing. . . 
Innovative 
Landscape 
Design 



v'V,^.'.';W^si^^il|l||);,iij 



Designers: 

Bill Maries - Ohio State 
Eric Gunderson - Va. Tech 
Vicki Matheny - Ohio State 



I 



,i,i 



Japanese Gardens, Williamsburg Styling, 
Formal, Natural or Contemporary Design for 
Your Home, 



1 1. 



We offer free landscape design service. Call 
547-1880 for an in-home landscape consultation 
with our design experts. No obligation. 



1 1 



'I 



[""'"*'''' ''•V"/ m '/ '• ' 











SmrPNKlNCH 





344 Battlefield Blvd. N. 

(1 mi. Sooth of Oienpeake General Ho^rital) 

Chesapeake, VA 

Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8-6 Sun. 10-5 







•83 A Year Of Celebration 27